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Dutchman Wants to Deploy Barriers to Gather, Recycle Pacific Plastic

your phone can be ocean plastic in the future," Slat told Reuters. Environmental groups including Greenpeace have said removing large quantities of plastic could damage marine life. "To filter the plastic out of the water could affect very small marine life which is very important for the food chain," said Elvira Jimenez, a coordinator for Greenpeace's ocean campaign. Slat said his barriers would not act like a net and would spare marine life. Plastic pollution already threatened hundreds of species with extinction, a problem that is becoming more acute over time as larger chunks

Photo of what seaweed community looks like after introduction of invasive seaweed (Dasysiphonia japonica) (Photo: Kristen Mello/UNH)

Sea Habitats Altered by More Invasive Seaweed-Study

of New Hampshire looked at seaweed populations over the last 30 years in the Southwestern Gulf of Maine and found the once predominant and towering kelp seaweed beds are declining and more invasive, shrub-like species have taken their place, altering the look of the ocean floor and the base of the marine food chain.   In the study, recently published in the Journal of Ecology, researchers compared photos of sections of the sea floor collected over 30 years at several subtidal sites in the Southwestern Gulf of Maine. They also collected individual seaweed species to determine their complexity and

Algae. Pic: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Ice algae: The Engine of Life in the Central Arctic Ocean

 Algae that live in and under the sea ice play a much greater role for the Arctic food web than previously assumed.    In a new study, biologists of the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) showed that not only animals that live directly under the ice thrive on carbon produced by so-called ice algae.    Even species that mostly live at greater depth depend to a large extent on carbon from these algae. This also means that the decline of the Arctic sea ice may have far-reaching consequences for the entire food web of the Arctic Ocean.

Photo courtesy of the American Chemical Society

Sunscreen Ingredients Might Harm Marine Life

New study finds nanosunscreens toxic to base of ocean food chain A new study published in the American Chemical Society’s Journal of Environmental Science and Technology demonstrates the harmful effects of nanoparticles from sunscreens on ocean ecosystems. The researchers found that when nanoparticles of titanium dioxide and zinc oxide react with UV light in water, they create hydrogen peroxide, which can stunt the growth of phytoplankton. Phytoplankton are a critical species of tiny algae at the base of marine food chains, sustaining animals ranging from small fish, which feed dolphins and

Photo: W&O

W&O Employees Volunteer at Local Food Bank

Employees of W&O, an international supplier of products and services to the marine industry headquartered in Jacksonville, Fla., volunteered their time with the Second Harvest Food Bank of North Florida last week. The employees volunteered their time sorting and stocking food during the workday as part of W&O's corporate responsibility program, Time2Help. Time2Help is an initiative launched by W&O's parent company, Pon, that allows employees to dedicate 1% of their time—or two full days per year for full-time employees—to work on a community service project, which is part of

Intertek Addresses Global Mercury Pollution

the issue of mercury pollution across industries during the “International Conference on Mercury as a Global Pollutant” (ICMGP) in Edinburgh, Scotland, July 28 to August 2, 2013. Intertek will showcase expertise in detecting, monitoring and controlling mercury, supporting industries such as food, consumer products and oil and gas. Recent Harvard studies have shown that mercury is a long term problem, as past accumulations built over thousands of years could persist for centuries. The Harvard study advocates prompt reductions in mercury, suggesting that if nothing is done, levels of mercury

Nick Hardman-Mountford from CSIRO checks a BioArgo’s satellite communication link. Photo Credit: CSIRO

Australian Bio-Robots to Explore in the Indian Ocean

being dropped into masses of spinning water.   It will be the first time CSIRO has used the new BioArgo robotic floats to measure this massively under-sampled part of the world.   "These can tell us about the growth of plankton, how much carbon they take up, how much gets used up the food chain and how much gets buried," CSIRO project leader Dr Nick Hardman-Mountford said.   "Knowing about this growth is important for predicting how much food the Indian Ocean can produce and how much carbon dioxide it can capture, and will give us a better idea of what keeps the Indian

BV Opens doors to Their Testing Labs in Germany

as national and international standards. Attendees had the opportunity to tour the state-of-the-art premises, meet Bureau Veritas CPS technical experts and listen to a series of seminars on current topics such as the Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals (ZDHC) initiative or the latest developments in food contact and cosmetics regulations. Xavier Dennery, Senior Vice President EMEA at Bureau Veritas Consumer Products Services comments: “Chemical requirements for consumer products are becoming increasingly complex; many of them are driven by the European Union who is keen to protect consumers

Control site Ambient. Photo source :Alfred Wegener Institute PR

Tropical Coral reefs lose their Zooplankton through Ocean Acidification

acidification. Instead of densely branched branching corals, robust mounding species of hard coral grow, offering the zooplankton little shelter. In a study published on 19 September 2016 at the online portal of the journal Nature Climate Change, the researchers report that the impact on the food web of the coral reefs is far-reaching, since these micro-organisms are an important food source for fish and coral. The volcanic carbon dioxide sources off the coast of Papua New Guinea are a unique natural laboratory. "Here, we can already observe under natural conditions how the reefs may

This frame grab from video taken by MBARI’s MiniROV shows the inner house of a giant larvacean, with its inner chambers outlined by the red sheet of laser light from the DeepPIV system. Image © 2015 MBARI

Lasers Shed Light on the Inner Workings of the Giant Larvacean

will help scientists understand how much carbon dioxide the oceans are absorbing from the atmosphere. Larvaceans play a significant role in moving carbon from the upper part of the ocean down into the deep sea. They build balloon-like mucus structures called “houses,” which concentrate food by filtering tiny particles out of the surrounding seawater. These particles contain organic carbon, some of which originated as carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Over time their filters become overloaded with particles, and the larvacean abandons its house. The discarded houses collapse and sink

Climate Change Could Alter Key Ocean Bacteria

Climate change could put a type of oceanic bacteria into evolutionary overdrive in a way that could pose a threat to its long-term survivability and its important role in the food chain, according to a study published on Tuesday.   The research published in the journal Nature Communications focuses on trichodesmium, a cyanobacteria found in tropical and subtropical waters such as the Red Sea, the Great Barrier Reef off Australia's coast, areas around Hawaii and the Caribbean.   Trichodesmium is important to the ocean's food chain because it converts atmospheric nitrogen gas into biological

Dr. Jeremy L. Conkle (Photo courtesy of Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi)

Study: Microplastics Increasingly Consumed by Marine Life

fibers in the washing machine, where they enter our waste stream.”   The plastics from clothes and personal care products then go down drains, and because most float, are not removed during wastewater treatment. The microplastics are then discharged into surface waters where they can become food for aquatic organisms.   Research in the new Coastal Health and Water Quality (C-HaWQ) lab will explore microplastics as a source of toxins ingested by marine organisms. These microplastics, which are less than five millimeters in diameter, eventually float into coastal environments where they

Image: University of Hull

Emission Changing the Smell of the Sea

increasing acidification of the world’s oceans has the potential to significantly disrupt the way marine life communicates, with yet unknown consequences for the ecosystem. Increasing levels of CO2 pumped into the atmosphere are altering chemical communication which marine life relies upon to find food, avoid predators and to mate.   The research, published today in the Global Change Biology Journal, is expected to have a big impact as its potential implications range from aquaculture to ecosystem management and conservation.   Ocean acidification occurs when the CO2 in the atmosphere

Image courtesy of Shark Shield

Hawaii Shark Attacks: 'Shark Shield' Should Prevent Them

device turned off, there were 16 breaches and 27 surface interactions. Amanda Wilson, Managing Director of Shark Shield, says the deterrent works on the principle that all chondrichthyes — sharks, rays, skates and chimeras — possess ampullary receptors in their heads which are used to find food, communicate and find a mate. These receptors are tuned to low-frequency fields but they only operate when in close proximity with food — or a diver. “Strapped to the ankle of a swimmer or diver, the Shark Shield emits an electromagnetic field between two electrodes that disturbs these

Ezra Holdings Chairman Steps Down

, a role that allows him to continue to contribute his perspective from his extensive experience in the industry. New Chairman Mr Koh Poh Tiong joined Ezra’s Board on 1 October 2011 as non-executive Vice-Chairman. With over 42 years of corporate experience in diverse sectors, ranging from food and beverage to shipping, he is passionate about building global brands and companies. He served as CEO of the Food & Beverage Division of Fraser and Neave Limited from 2008 to 2011. He was CEO of Asia Pacific Breweries Limited (APB) from 1993 to 2008. “I am delighted that Mr Koh has

John Kerry (State Department photo)

DOS to Hold “Our Ocean” Conference

will build on what we’ve done already and it will be an important start to a much larger effort, because if we are going to pass on a livable ocean to the next generation, we need to act much more forcefully now,” Kerry said. “Whether we’re talking about trade, or climate or food sustainability, there can be no doubt that the ocean requires our protection and our collective action.” Invitees to the conference include government ministers, scientists, advocates, people whose livelihoods and well-being depend upon the oceans, and members of the international oceans

Courtesy of NOC

OSIL Giant Snow Catchers for NERC Research

use in the NERC funded Shelf Sea Biogeochemistry research program next year. The shelf seas are highly productive, and have been estimated to be the most valuable biome on Earth, but they are under considerable stress as a result of anthropogenic influences. Their importance to society extends beyond food production to include issues of biodiversity, carbon cycling and storage, waste disposal, nutrient cycling, recreation and renewable energy resources. However, even within the relatively well-studied European shelf seas, fundamental biogeochemical processes are poorly understood. For example: the

Ocean Farming AS, supported by Kongsberg Maritime AS, building the world’s first automated ‘exposed’ aquaculture facility (Image: Kongsberg Maritime)

First Offshore Aquaculture Development Green Lighted

automated ‘exposed’ aquaculture facility. Situated outside of Trondheim, this new facility introduces a paradigm shift in salmon farming now, and other fish types in the future and is a significant step in Norway’s efforts to deliver technical solutions to address the impending global food gap challenge.   The Ocean Farming facility is a new design developed to overcome the challenges of more traditional inshore fish farming facilities by being located in deeper waters, further from the coast. The submerged, anchored fixed structure will float steady in the exposed ocean and

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