Posted by April 7, 2017

Buoy Harnesses Wave Energy to Power Instruments at Sea

  • Photo: Resen Waves
  • Photo: Resen Waves
  • Photo: Resen Waves Photo: Resen Waves
  • Photo: Resen Waves Photo: Resen Waves

A new buoy from Danish company Resen Waves harnesses wave energy to provide continuous power and real time data connectivity to autonomous instruments and machinery in the oceans as a plug and play solution.

 
While instruments and machinery in the sea have traditionally been powered by batteries, PV or diesel generators, this typically requires regular ship operation to replace batteries or supply of fuel and maintain diesel generators. This is not always possible due to weather and can become costly, meaning power is often economized by cutting back on data transmission, which limits the applications of the instruments.
 
Resen Waves has set out to solve these issues by installing a power buoy in the sea where the power and data connectivity is required. The buoy powers a battery pack on the seabed through the mooring line, and the battery pack feeds power to the various instruments and machinery in the sea. Instrument data is logged from the buoy through a fiber optic Ethernet connection in the mooring line, and the data is transmitted from the buoy to shore per satellite, 3G or 4G connections.
 
Therefore, with the Resen Waves buoy it is now possible to access instruments in real time through smart phones or a web application, no matter where the instruments are located in the big oceans without some of the usual power limitations.
 
The buoys require an average wave height between and 0.5m and 2m and can be installed in water depths from 10m and up to 200m as standard. Special versions are available can be installed in up to 3,000m of water depth. The buoys are designed for full ocean exposure in big waves during storms.
 
The smallest buoy is a 300W unit, with the outer dimensions of 1,6m(L) x 1,6m(W) x 1m(H). Weight 350kg. It can be transported on a trailer and installed from small vessels.
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