Cables News

L3 Harris UK’s C-Worker 7 working with an ROV off the UK’s south coast. Photos from L3 Harris UK.

Marine Autonomy Above & Below the Water

and dangerous” work off humans. Instead of having a 24m-long vessel with people on, “bouncing around”, a 7m-long unmanned boat can be used. It’s also not just applicable to oil and gas, he says, but also offshore wind, where thousands of structures need inspecting, as well as the cables between them. It also reduces cost and increases repeatability, Cowles says.Phase 1 of the ARISE project was a feasibility study, part funded by Innovate UK. This saw a Saab Seaeye inspection class Falcon ROV deployed from a C-Worker 7 ASV with a 2.5 x 1m moonpool. The ROV was kept in a hanger with

L3 Harris UK’s C-Worker 7 working with an ROV off the UK’s south coast. Photos from L3 Harris UK.

Hybrid Autonomous Systems Evolve

and dangerous” work off humans. Instead of having a 24m-long vessel with people on, “bouncing around”, a 7m-long unmanned boat can be used. It’s also not just applicable to oil and gas, he says, but also offshore wind, where thousands of structures need inspecting, as well as the cables between them. It also reduces cost and increases repeatability, Cowles says.Phase 1 of the ARISE project was a feasibility study, part funded by Innovate UK. This saw a Saab Seaeye inspection class Falcon ROV deployed from a C-Worker 7 ASV with a 2.5 x 1m moonpool. The ROV was kept in a hanger with

PSW Spoolbase, the image has been cropped. Source: PSW Group

PSW Takes Over EMAS Spoolbase In Norway

already in dialogue with global companies who are investigating the possibility of using PSW Spoolbase versus new establishments in other regions”.Apart from the offshore oil and gas industry, PSW Group also plans to further develop the facilities to handle spooling and logistics for offshore power cables that are necessary for offshore wind projects, as the company is currently working on several prospects together with companies outside of Norway

Equinor's Oseberg field center (Photo: Ole Jørgen Bratland, Equinor)

Norway Plans North Sea Power Grid

is owned by Partners Group, which bought it from Norway's HitecVision for 1.2 billion euros ($1.3 billion) in April.Equinor's Johan Sverdrup oilfield, as well as its Troll A gas platform, the largest on the Norwegian continental shelf, receive power from an onshore grid.There are plans to extend cables from the Sverdrup platform to nearby fields, including Lundin Petroleum's Edvard Grieg and Aker BP's Ivar Aasen platforms.BKK and CapeOmega's plans were previously reported by Upstream online news site.($1 = 9.1609 Norwegian crowns)($1 = 0.9073 euros) (Reporting by Nerijus Adomaitis

© glimpseofsweden / Adobe Stock

Protecting Subsea Cabling

prevalent. In fact, Britain is set to increase the amount of energy produced from offshore wind farms from 7% to 30% over the next decade.However, offshore wind energy is completely reliant on subsea cabling to deliver power back to land and allow transmission between turbines. If these essential cables become damaged or start to malfunction, it could completely cease production — requiring expensive repair work.Threats to subsea cables are a huge risk to offshore wind farms, one that the renewables market needs to take seriously if they’re to remain viable in the long-term.Damage and

Image: First Subsea

First Subsea CPS for WindFloat

UK's developer and supplier of connectors, First Subsea has delivered a beach landing Cable Protection System for the export cables on the 25MW WindFloat Atlantic project, located 20 kilometers off the coast of Viana do Castelo in Portugal. Hengtong Group was contracted through its Submarine Business Units to deliver the export cable for the beach export system which was installed on schedule by its contractor DeepOcean at the end of June 2019.The cable protection system is designed to suit the export cable and consists of clamps, bellmouth and cable protection. First Subsea project manager

Photo: First Subsea

Cable Protection System for WindFloat Atlantic Project

First Subsea has delivered a beach landing Cable Protection System for the export cables on the 25MW WindFloat Atlantic project.The project is located 20 kilometers off the coast of Viana do Castelo in Portugal.Hengtong Group was contracted through its Submarine Business Units to deliver the export cable for the beach export system which was installed on schedule by its contractor DeepOcean at the end of June 2019. The cable protection system is designed to suit the export cable and consists of clamps, bellmouth and cable protection. WindFloat Atlantic uses cutting-edge technology from Principle

First Subsea cable protection systems (CPS) for the Export Cables and Cross Over Protection for TenneT’s Net op zee Hollandse Kust (zuid) offshore wind farm. (Photo: First Subsea)

First Subsea Wins Dutch Wind Farm Work

First Subsea announced it has been selected by Van Oord / Cablel to supply cable protection systems (CPS) for the export cables and cross over protection for TenneT’s Net op zee Hollandse Kust (zuid) offshore wind farm located 20 kilometers off the coast of The Hague in the Netherlands.First Subsea said it will engineer, test and supply a CPS for the protection of the 220 kV Export Cables and the 66 kV Interlink Cable between the J-tube at the offshore sub-stations, Alpha and Beta. The platforms shall be of a jacket design and J-tubes used to guide and protect the export cables entering the

Image: NKT

NKT Confirms Dogger Bank OWF Gig

Danish cables supplier NKT has entered a Preferred Supplier Agreement (PSA) as main contractor for delivery and installation of high-voltage DC on- and offshore export cable systems to the Dogger Bank Wind Farms Creyke Beck A and Creyke Beck B site.Now, with an agreement of a EPCI (Engineering, Procurement, Construction and Installation) contract with project owners Equinor and SSE Renewables, NKT confirms the order, which is the largest XLPE power cables order ever for the company, and has added the project to its the high-voltage order backlog.As previously announced, the order represents a contract

Photo Credit: Marine Technology Society

#Oi2020 History

In 1976, testing began by the Naval Electronics Laboratory Center of two fiber optic undersea tow cables. This was done to measure “changes in optical attenuation caused by cabling, tension, temperature and pressure,” according to the book Advances in Marine Technology, as published by the Marine Technology Society. The testing led to the six-fiber cable (as manufactured by ITT Electro-Products Division, as the caveat to commence the accuracy of using fiber optics in undersea tow cables.   Marine Technology Reporter has been commissioned to publish the Official “Oceanolo

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