Food News

Photo: W&O

W&O Employees Volunteer at Local Food Bank

Employees of W&O, an international supplier of products and services to the marine industry headquartered in Jacksonville, Fla., volunteered their time with the Second Harvest Food Bank of North Florida last week. The employees volunteered their time sorting and stocking food during the workday as part of W&O's corporate responsibility program, Time2Help. Time2Help is an initiative launched by W&O's parent company, Pon, that allows employees to dedicate 1% of their time—or two full days per year for full-time employees—to work on a community service project, which is part of

Jim Hanlon (Photo: Institute for Ocean Research Enterprise)

Atlantic Canada: Where the World’s Subsea Technology Grows

connected means that there is good opportunity for collaboration. The biggest city in the region is Halifax, and the total population is 500,000. Going back to the greater ocean economy I like to say there are five components:  security and defense,  energy from the ocean,  food from the ocean,  marine transportation and  marine tourism.  Atlantic Canada has good representation in all five of those sectors of the global ocean economy, so we are not a ‘one trick pony.’ It’s really an opportunity and a good moment in time to scale

(Image: Damen)

Fisheries Research Vessel Ordered for Germany

The German Federal Office for Agriculture and Food (Bundesanstalt für Landwirtschaft und Ernährung, BLE) has signed a contract with Damen Shipyards Group for the construction of a new fisheries research vessel following a European tendering process, realized by the Federal Waterways Engineering and Research Institute (Bundesanstalt für Wasserbau, BAW).   With the vessel, to be called the Walther Herwig, the German Federal Ministry for Food and Agriculture (BMEL) will support Germany’s fisheries and oceanographic research programs.   Measuring 85 x 17,40 meters

Photo of what seaweed community looks like after introduction of invasive seaweed (Dasysiphonia japonica) (Photo: Kristen Mello/UNH)

Sea Habitats Altered by More Invasive Seaweed-Study

of New Hampshire looked at seaweed populations over the last 30 years in the Southwestern Gulf of Maine and found the once predominant and towering kelp seaweed beds are declining and more invasive, shrub-like species have taken their place, altering the look of the ocean floor and the base of the marine food chain.   In the study, recently published in the Journal of Ecology, researchers compared photos of sections of the sea floor collected over 30 years at several subtidal sites in the Southwestern Gulf of Maine. They also collected individual seaweed species to determine their complexity and

© whitcomberd / Adobe Stock

Dutchman Wants to Deploy Barriers to Gather, Recycle Pacific Plastic

your phone can be ocean plastic in the future," Slat told Reuters. Environmental groups including Greenpeace have said removing large quantities of plastic could damage marine life. "To filter the plastic out of the water could affect very small marine life which is very important for the food chain," said Elvira Jimenez, a coordinator for Greenpeace's ocean campaign. Slat said his barriers would not act like a net and would spare marine life. Plastic pollution already threatened hundreds of species with extinction, a problem that is becoming more acute over time as larger chunks

© sdecoret / Adobe Stock

All Eyes on Ireland

in other sectors as a knock-on effect, and for every 100 marine jobs, a further 75 jobs are created indirectly in other parts of the economy.   From tourism, to bioresources, to transportation The top three marine sectors in terms of employment and turnover are marine tourism and leisure; seafood and bioresources (fisheries, aquaculture, seafood processing, biotech/seaweed); and shipping and maritime transportation (including international shipping services). However, R&D-intensive industries such as high-tech marine products and services and ocean energy saw substantial increases over

Photo courtesy of the American Chemical Society

Sunscreen Ingredients Might Harm Marine Life

New study finds nanosunscreens toxic to base of ocean food chain A new study published in the American Chemical Society’s Journal of Environmental Science and Technology demonstrates the harmful effects of nanoparticles from sunscreens on ocean ecosystems. The researchers found that when nanoparticles of titanium dioxide and zinc oxide react with UV light in water, they create hydrogen peroxide, which can stunt the growth of phytoplankton. Phytoplankton are a critical species of tiny algae at the base of marine food chains, sustaining animals ranging from small fish, which feed dolphins and

Reliable and constant measurements of environmental currents and other oceanographic environmental conditions can markedly improve the performance of fish farms in Chile. (Photo: Nortek)

Maximizing the Potential of Chile's Fish Farms

of oceanographic service provider Mariscope Ingenieria SPA in Chile, and a representative for Doppler technology provider Nortek in the Chilean market.    Why is measuring waves and currents with Doppler technology a key part of making aquaculture more efficient?   Reducing aquaculture food loss with up to 20 percent Measuring waves and currents helps with issues such as calculating the most effective location of the cages’ moorings, the shape of those cages, and the position of floating barges. It also helps fish farmers economize on fish fodder.   “Typically, fishmeal

© willyam / Adobe Stock

New York Noise: A Risk for Endangered Whales

Noise in New York has always grated on people and now, with the cacophony engulfing surrounding waters, it is threatening the city's newly discovered neighbors: endangered whales. Rare North Atlantic right whales and other species that use tonal and pulsating songs to find food and mates have been detected in New York waters by an underwater monitor that the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the Wildlife Conservation Society installed last year. Aerial surveys since March have revealed 61 whales, including eight right whales, four sperm whales and 21 fin whales, all endangered species

Algae. Pic: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Ice algae: The Engine of Life in the Central Arctic Ocean

 Algae that live in and under the sea ice play a much greater role for the Arctic food web than previously assumed.    In a new study, biologists of the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) showed that not only animals that live directly under the ice thrive on carbon produced by so-called ice algae.    Even species that mostly live at greater depth depend to a large extent on carbon from these algae. This also means that the decline of the Arctic sea ice may have far-reaching consequences for the entire food web of the Arctic Ocean.

© Lesya Castillo / Adobe Stock

Seaweed: Fuel of the Future?

and harvesting macroalgae (seaweed) efficiently and cost-effectively, MARINER project teams are building the tools we need to fully put this resource to work contributing to our energy future," said ARPA-E Acting Director Eric Rohlfing.   In the U.S., seaweed is currently primarily used in food and food processing for humans and animals, and mostly comes from imported farmed product or wild harvests. Expanding seaweed farming domestically would relieve pressure on wild stocks, create jobs and revitalize working waterfronts, WHOI said. Expanded and more efficient production will ultimately

© somchairakin / Adobe Stock

Britain Bans Microbeads; Lawmakers Urge More Action on Plastic

, face washes and shower gels that end up in the oceans, will come into force in Britain on Tuesday, but lawmakers said more needed to be done to tackle plastic pollution.   The tiny plastic beads pollute waterways and oceans, where they can be eaten by marine life and end up in the human food chain. A report by lawmakers in 2016 said the industry’s commitment to phasing them out was inconsistent and recommended a ban.   “Microbeads in cosmetics are an avoidable part of the problem, which is why we called for a ban,” member of parliament Mary Creagh, chair of the

Karina Gould, Minister for Democratic Institutions, on behalf of Dominic LeBlanc, Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, announces new funding for the fight against Asian carps. (Photo: Fisheries and Oceans Canada)

Canada Ramps up Its Fight against Great Lakes’ Asian Carp

; Asian carps are among the top aquatic invasive species being monitored for their potential establishment in the Great Lakes. Already established in the Mississippi River basin in the U.S., the four species of Asian carps (Bighead, Silver, Grass and Black) aggressively compete with native fishes for food and habitat, and have quickly become the dominant species.   Risk assessments conducted by Canada and the U.S. show that the Great Lakes contains enough food and adequate habitat for Bighead, Silver and Grass carps to support an invasion and establishment.   On behalf of Dominic LeBlanc

Control site Ambient. Photo source :Alfred Wegener Institute PR

Tropical Coral reefs lose their Zooplankton through Ocean Acidification

acidification. Instead of densely branched branching corals, robust mounding species of hard coral grow, offering the zooplankton little shelter. In a study published on 19 September 2016 at the online portal of the journal Nature Climate Change, the researchers report that the impact on the food web of the coral reefs is far-reaching, since these micro-organisms are an important food source for fish and coral. The volcanic carbon dioxide sources off the coast of Papua New Guinea are a unique natural laboratory. "Here, we can already observe under natural conditions how the reefs may

Photo: Corie Charpentier, post-doc research associate at Rutgers University

Glider-Based Ecosystem Study

between multiple trophic levels (phytoplankton, zooplankton and fish) and their relationships to the physical hydrographic driving forces such as sea ice and currents.   A key component to this investigation is the AZFP's ability to differentiate key species within this important Antarctic food web. Species of specific interest include various copepods, crystal krill (Euphausia crystallorophias), and Antarctic silverfish (Pleuragramma antarcticum). The glider was also instrumented with a CTD, a WET Labs BB2FL ECO puck to measure phytoplankton biomass and an Aandera Optode dissolved oxygen

(Photo: EU NAVFOR)

Italian Navy Divers Practice with Explosives

Margottini put a floating ‘dummy’ mine into the sea and then carried out a controlled explosion.ITS Margottini is currently deployed on counter-piracy operations as part of EU NAVFOR’s Op Atalanta. EU NAVFOR warships have been committed, since December 2008, to ensure the safety of World Food Program humanitarian aid vessels delivering aid to the Somali people and the free movement of trade within the Indian Ocean and Gulf of Aden

Spotting the Zooplankton Observatory near Heligoland from the ship Neuwerk. (Photo Alfred Wegener Institute)

Researchers Develop Underwater Observatory

the smallest marine life underwater - around the clock and even under conditions where no research ship can leave the port. Microscopically small creatures, fish larvae, jellyfish as well as youth stages of many snails and echinoderms - all this is counted as zooplankton. It is the basis of the food chain in the sea, its distribution and diversity is thus also of great importance for many fish stocks and sea mammals.   The zooplankton observatory is able to automatically detect the distribution patterns of the micro-organisms and particles with a high spatial and temporal resolution,

Marine Technology Magazine Cover Jun 2018 - Underwater Defense

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