Seafloor Mapping

Seabed Geosolutions Wins Brazil Survey Work

Fugro said its joint venture with CGG has secured a contract from Petrobras for a 3D ocean bottom node (OBN) survey in the Brazilian Santos Basin.   The seven month contract awarded to the survey firms’ joint venture Seabed Geosolutions is valued at around $90 million and is scheduled to commence at the end of the fourth quarter of 2017 or early 2018, Fugro said.   According to Seabed Geosolutions CEO, Stephan Midenet, the OBN survey is the “industry’s largest ever” and will span more than 1,600 square kilometers.    Midenet added that Seabed Geosolution

Iain Wallace (Photo: Rovco)

Wallace Joins Rovco as CTO

U.K.-based subsea company Rovco has appointed Dr. Iain Wallace o its senior management team as chief technology officer (CTO).   A former technical lead for the European Space Agency, Wallace will drive the development of a real-time 3D vision system for ROVs and AUVs. He will also explore how artificial intelligence can be used to solve asset integrity issues by extracting actionable information from traditional video survey data.   As CTO, he will enhance Rovco’s underwater photogrammetric 3D modeling capabilities utilizing the latest simultaneous location and mapping (SLAM)

Photo: Kongsberg Maritime

University of Gothenburg Selects HUGIN AUV

The University Of Gothenburg has chosen Kongsberg Maritime’s HUGIN autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) to expand Sweden’s capabilities in the field of marine research using unmanned platforms. The HUGIN, which will be funded by grants from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation and managed by a project team with representatives from the University of Gothenburg, Chalmers University of Technology and Stockholm University, will be recognized as a national asset for marine research projects around Sweden and further afield.   The University of Gothenburg has chosen a HUGIN configuratio

(Image: Channel Coastal Observatory)

The Autonomous Future of Seabed Mapping

fact, thanks to advances in satellite monitoring by pioneers such as David Sandwell and colleagues, we now have coverage of the entire ocean.    While these maps are only at a resolution of around 5 kilometers – less than current global maps of Mars and Venus – it has given us submarine topography data in locations we weren’t able to access previously. For us to really understand what lies under the surface, scientists must travel to the site and use acoustic techniques such as sonar and multibeam bathymetry to produce detailed maps. But, the financial and logistical obstacles

SeeByte Wins Belgian Navy Contract

Belgian Navy buys 10 licenses of SeeByte’s SeeTrack software for its AUV fleet   SeeByte, creator of smart software for unmanned maritime systems, said it has sold 10 SeeTrack licenses, including personnel training, to the Belgian Navy. SeeTrack will be integrated onto its AUV fleet which will be deployed for Mine Counter Measures (MCM).   The software package includes additional specialist modules designed for mine countermeasure (MCM) operations, SeeByte said. These include Automatic Target Recognition (ART), Change Detection Tool, Performance Analysis Training Tool (PATT) and

Photo: NOC

How Does Ocean Circulation Impact Marine Protected Areas?

Researchers at the National Oceanography Center (NOC) studying the U.K.’s four largest Marine Protected Areas have found that, because of the ocean’s vigorous circulation, even remote, seemingly pristine habitats, are not isolated from human activities, and may be vulnerable to pollution and overfishing impacts.   In recent years, a number of large Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) have been set up around the world to create ‘safe havens’ for marine life. These have been established to help with biodiversity and habitat preservation, to restore damaged ecosystems, and also

© sdecoret / Adobe Stock

All Eyes on Ireland

the Irish Government’s ‘Our Ocean Wealth’ strategy has ambitious targets to increase the turnover from the country’s ocean economy to exceed €6.4 billion by 2020 and to double the value of its ocean wealth to 2.4 percent of GDP by 2030.   Ireland’s GDP from the marine sector at 0.8 percent represents significant opportunities for growth given that the international average is about 2 percent and Ireland is a maritime nation with significant marine resources. The Our Ocean Wealth strategy has a target to grow this to 2.4 percent of GDP by 2030 based on economic

Photo: Teledyne Optech

Teledyne Optech Environmental Monitoring In Focus

. Viktor Feygels will present “CZMIL as a Rapid Environmental Disaster Response Tool”. Using case studies from CZMIL and its predecessor systems, Dr. Feygels will describe four distinct applications of Teledyne Optech lidar bathymeters.   In addition, Research Scientist Hieu Duong and Marine Business Manager Bob Marthouse will present “Small-Object Detection using Coastal Zone Mapping and Imaging Lidar (CZMIL)” at the Teledyne CARIS International User Group Conference in Ottawa, Canada.   “CZMIL has proved to be ideally suited for rapid environmental assessment

Kraken Wins Repeat AquaPix Contract

Kraken Sonar Inc. said its wholly-owned subsidiary Kraken Sonar Systems Inc. has been awarded a repeat contract valued at over C$400,000 (US$296,000) by a leading European defense contractor. Kraken will supply and integrate its AquaPix Miniature Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Sonar and Real-Time SAS Signal Processor on the customer’s autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV). Delivery is expected in Q3, 2017.   AquaPix is designed for operation on AUVs, manned and unmanned surface vessels and towed platforms. The modular system uses the latest electronics, transducer arrays and signal

Marine Technology Reporter - June 2017 Edition

The June 2017 edition of Marine Technology Reporter is now available here.   This edition includes features on: Autonomous Seabed Mapping – Advances in satellite monitoring increase mapping coverage of the entire ocean. Ed Hill – The NOC Executive Director discusses the science and technologies advancing ocean studies. Data Processing – The hydrographic workflow has evolved thanks to a paradigm shift in data processing. Read more at http://digitalmagazines.marinelink.com/nwm/MarineTechnology/201706/.

The new center will investigate key underwater and coastal archaeological sites around the world. (Photo: Scripps Institution of Oceanography)

Marine Archaeology Center Launched

UC San Diego launches Scripps Center for Marine Archaeology; center co-led by Scripps and Department of Anthropology will investigate relationship between human societies and marine environments   Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the Department of Anthropology have recently joined efforts within the University of California San Diego to launch the Scripps Center for Marine Archaeology (SCMA).   Researchers with the Scripps Center for Marine Archaeology will conduct fieldwork at key underwater and coastal archaeological sites around the world, studying the influence of marine

ROV SuBastian on Sea Trials. (Photo: Schmidt Ocean Institute)

Creating Superior Buoyancy with Air

that must not be overlooked when specifying buoyancy packages for these vehicles. As such, vehicle manufacturers should look to work with suppliers that can manufacture and test these small, but essential, microspheres for use in their buoyancy.     (As published in the May 2017 edition of Marine Technology Reporter

Photo: Damen

First Steel Cut for Australia's New Polar Research Ship

Marking the commencement of construction of the Damen Antarctic Supply Research Vessel (ASRV), a steel cutting ceremony has been held at Damen Shipyards Galati, Romania. Damen is constructing the ASRV for Serco Defence, a wholly owned subsidiary of Serco Australia who, in turn, signed a contract with the Australian Government last year for the delivery, operation and maintenance of the vessel.   “Cutting the first steel for any vessel is always significant. However, the fact that the ASRV is such a ground-breaker makes this a very exciting moment,” said Damen Project Director Joop

Photo: MacArtney

New Rescue Vessel Decked out with High-tech Equipment

 Complete multibeam echo-sounder system and high-speed winch supplied, installed and set to work by MacArtney’s French subsidiary.   A newly built state-of-the-art rescue vessel Sirius operated by VLOOT dab is 45 m long, almost 11 m wide and can reach a speed of 13 knots. Sirius, which has been designed for combating disasters at sea, required a range of high-tech equipment.    The scope of supply for Sirius includes a multibeam echo sounder system comprising a high-resolution multibeam echo sounder, Kongsberg EM 2040 Dual RX, which is a wide band HD shallow water multi-bea

Image: Kongsberg

Tech File: Kongsberg’s Compact Survey Vessel

GeoSwath 4R system is pre-calibrated so that the survey operation can commence immediately on arrival, and no time is wasted running additional survey lines.    Its shallow draft, high top speed and maneuverability combined with the stability of a catamaran hull make it ideal for use in both marine surveys and on canals, river and lakes. The ability to steer tight survey grids makes it a fast and accurate addition to the surveyor’s portfolio.   The new GeoSwath 4R system offers unsurpassed productivity in shallow waters with at least 12x water depth coverage right up to the waterline

Newly discovered B-25 Bomber (Photo: Project Recover)

Missing WW II Bombers Found on the Seafloor

follows successful identification and documentation of five missing World War II aircraft in 2016   Two B-25 bombers associated with American servicemen missing in action from World War II were recently documented in the waters off Papua New Guinea by Project Recover—a collaborative team of marine scientists, archaeologists and volunteers who have combined efforts to locate aircraft and associated MIAs from World War II.   The B-25 bomber is one of the most iconic airplanes of World War II, with nearly 10,000 of the famous warbirds conducting a variety of missions—from bombing

Photo courtesy of Bay Ship and Yacht

RV Sally Ride Enters Dry Dock for Maintenance

The Sally Ride, a Neil Armstrong Class Auxiliary General Oceanographic Research (AGOR) vessel, dry docked at Bay Ship and Yacht on April 15, 2017, to carry out modifications to superstructure and to perform general vessel maintenance. Named for the late astronaut Sally Ride, the ship is 238 feet long and incorporates the latest technologies, including high-efficiency diesel engines, emissions controls for stack gases, and new information technology tools both for monitoring shipboard systems and for communicating with the world. It will serve to provide scientists with the tools and capabilities

Using a new method to distinguish fresh water from oil or salt water, scientists are exploring beneath the continental shelf off New England to look for large pockets of trapped fresh water. This water may be continually filling from groundwater flowing from land or, alternatively, may have been left behind by ice-age glaciers. (Image: Eric S. Taylor, WHOI Graphic Services)

Fresh Water below the Seafloor?

if its gets into the ground, it absorbs iron and other nutrients. So it has a higher nutrient content when it comes out and would be providing nutrients to the ocean.”   This has huge implications for the ocean food web and Earth’s climate. Nutrients fertilize the productivity of tiny marine phytoplankton, which convert carbon dioxide into organic carbon to grow and draw the greenhouse gas out of the atmosphere.   Signs of weakness In some places, the ocean floor has created a watertight seal above freshwater reservoirs for millennia. But like the heft of a river pushing on a

Photo: Klein Marine Systems

Klein Marine Systems: Side Scan Sonar Training

Side scan sonar systems manufacturer Klein Marine Systems will host a three-day side scan sonar training course at the Seacoast Science Center in Rye Beach, N.H., with practical sessions on UNH Gulf Challenger, based in Newcastle, N.H.   Participants will develop a thorough understanding of sonar image analysis as well as get hands-on experience with single beam sonars such as the dual-frequency Klein 4900 and the high-speed, Multi-Beam Klein 5000 V2.   The course, to be held June 20-22, 2017 from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., is geared toward hydrographers, first responders, police and firefighters

MV Fugro Helmert (Photo: Fugro)

Fugro Begins Survey for Norwegian Hydrographic Service

Fugro said it has commenced a hydrographic survey encompassing an area of Norwegian waters of approximately 15,000 square kilometers.   Awarded by the Norwegian Hydrographic Service, the contract value is 34.5 million NOK (approximately $4 million). The survey is part of the MAREANO program, for which Fugro has completed a number of surveys since 2006. The Norwegian program maps depth and topography, sediment composition, contaminants, biotopes and habitats. It takes place in the Barents Sea with various areas located above the 78th parallel and typical water depths ranging from 80 to 3

An ROV equipped with underwater dynamic laser mapping equipment from 2G Robotics and Sonardyne prepares for its next survey mission (Photo: Sonardyne)

Partners Developing Dynamic Subsea Laser Mapping

for dynamic scanning.   Edward Moller, Global Business Manager for Construction Survey at Sonardyne, said, “The level of detail visible in the post-processed images we’ve gathered on projects in recent months, has to be seen to be believed; small bolt-holes, individual chain links, marine growth and even painted markings can all be clearly seen. In terms of wide-area seabed visualization, it’s a real game-changer.”   Chris Gilson, Product Development Manager at 2G Robotics, said, “This new partnership eliminates the complexities most subsea customers face

This frame grab from video taken by MBARI’s MiniROV shows the inner house of a giant larvacean, with its inner chambers outlined by the red sheet of laser light from the DeepPIV system. Image © 2015 MBARI

Lasers Shed Light on the Inner Workings of the Giant Larvacean

New laser technology is allowing MBARI scientists to look into the structure of giant larvaceans–tadpole-like marine animals that are important players in ocean ecosystems. In a recent paper in Science Advances, MBARI researchers described a new method for measuring the flow of seawater through larvaceans and other gelatinous animals. The results will help scientists understand how much carbon dioxide the oceans are absorbing from the atmosphere. Larvaceans play a significant role in moving carbon from the upper part of the ocean down into the deep sea. They build balloon-like mucus structures

Photo of what seaweed community looks like after introduction of invasive seaweed (Dasysiphonia japonica) (Photo: Kristen Mello/UNH)

Sea Habitats Altered by More Invasive Seaweed-Study

Walking along the beaches of New England, it is easy to spot large amounts of a fine red seaweed clogging the coastline, the result of sweeping changes in the marine environment occurring beneath the water.   To further investigate, researchers at the University of New Hampshire looked at seaweed populations over the last 30 years in the Southwestern Gulf of Maine and found the once predominant and towering kelp seaweed beds are declining and more invasive, shrub-like species have taken their place, altering the look of the ocean floor and the base of the marine food chain.   In the study

Fugro Awarded Survey Work Papua New Guinea

 Fugro has been awarded a total of six hydrographic survey contracts by the National Maritime Safety Authority (NMSA) of Papua New Guinea to help contribute capacity development in the country, which has over 5,000 kilometers of coastline.   The surveys will be conducted utilizing a combination of Fugro’s Airborne LiDAR Bathymetry (ALB) and multibeam echo sounder (MBES) sensors and a seamless dataset will be delivered to the NMSA.   “As a pioneer of ALB development, Fugro has a solid track record in applying this advanced technology for mapping shallow water environments

Photo: Teledyne Webb Research

New Slocum Glider Delivered to UC Davis

 Teledyne Webb Research said it has recently sold and delivered a Slocum Glider to The University of California, Davis.   After its maiden flight in Antarctica, where the vehicle was initially used to examine physical processes of ice shelves in the Western Ross Sea, the glider has now been delivered to Davis where plans are underway for its new deployment in Lake Tahoe.   The glider shipped to UC Davis is equipped with a Seabird SBE pumped CTD, Wetlabs FLBBCD sensor and two customer supplied sensors including an Aanderraa oxygen optode and a sonotronics fish pinger.   The

Photo: JW Fishers

Fishers Equipment Helps Locate Weapons and Explosives

 Before 1970 the widely accepted solution for disposal of old munitions, typically called unexploded ordnance (UXO), was to dump them into rivers, lakes and oceans. Today we know this creates a multitude of problems, the worst of which are pollution and the risk of an explosion. Many people have already lost their lives to these underwater booby traps. The uncertainties surrounding their precise location and degree of decomposition, makes attempting to recover these dangerous devices an even more difficult task.   Several international organizations have been formed to address the problem

Sean Halpin (Photo: Liquid Robotics, a Boeing Company)

Voices: Sean Halpin

Bay, Maine with an old EG&G 272 sidescan sonar. The weather was awful, the boat stunk, and I ran the towfish into the seabed, but I absolutely loved it! I knew then that I wanted to work on, in, or near the ocean for the rest of my life. I went to sea for about eight years as a hydrographer and a marine geoscientist for a defense contractor and oil and gas companies. During this time, I was exposed to autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) as a tool for deep-water mapping. Just prior to joining the Liquid Robotics, I was the Global AUV Manager for DOF Subsea and was responsible for spear heading

Richard Dentzman (Photo: Klein Marine Systems)

Klein Hires Dentzman as Sales Manager

Klein Marine Systems, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Mitcham Industries, Inc., announced that Richard Dentzman has joined Klein as Regional Sales Manager.     Dentzman joins Klein Marine Systems as a Regional Sales Manager, contributing to Klein’s market share expansion and new product introduction, as well as strengthening cooperation with customers in the U.S. Navy, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers (USACE) and other defense customers around the world.   Dentzman is a U.S. submarine

Ship's Sponsor Diane Donald christens the Virginia-class submarine Indiana (SSN 789), witnessed by (from left) Vice President Mike Pence, Indiana's  Commanding Officer, Cdr. Jesse Zimbauer and Newport News Shipbuilding President Matt Mulherin. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy Huntington Ingalls Industries by Ashley Major)

US Navy Christens Submarine Indiana

 The U.S. Navy christened its newest Virginia-class fast attack submarine, the future USS Indiana (SSN 789), during a ceremony Saturday, April 29, at Huntington Ingalls Shipyard in Newport News, Va.    Vice President Mike Pence, who previously served as the 50th governor of Indiana, delivered the ceremony's principal address.   “[President Trump]sent me here today on this historic occasion as a sign of his deep commitment to the Armed Forces of the United States of America, and to his commitment to make the strongest fighting force in the world even stronger still,”

Image: United States Navy

US Navy to Christen Submarine Indiana

 The Navy will christen its newest Virginia-class fast attack submarine, the future USS Indiana (SSN 789), during an 11 a.m. EDT ceremony Saturday, April 29, at Huntington Ingalls Shipyard in Newport News, Virginia.    Vice President Mike Pence, who previously served as the 50th governor of Indiana, will deliver the ceremony's principal address. Diane Donald, wife of retired Adm. Kirkland H. Donald, director of Naval Nuclear Propulsion from 2004 to 2012, is serving as the ship's sponsor.    "The christening of the future USS Indiana brings this technological marvel

Philippines Completes Scientific Survey in Disputed Sea

Shoal and on three islands, including Thitu, in the Spratly group, National Security Adviser Hermogenes Esperon said.   "This purely scientific and environmental undertaking was pursued in line with Philippine responsibilities under the U.N. Convention of the Law of the Sea to protect the marine biodiversity and ensure the safety of navigation within the Philippines' EEZ," Esperon said in a statement.   He gave no details of the findings from the reef assessments and nautical mapping of the area done from April 7-25.   China claims almost the entire South China Sea, but

Photo: International Maritime Organization (IMO)

How Deep is the Ocean?

, Mars and Venus than for most of the world’s maritime areas.   In this context, hydrographers make a valuable contribution to the delivery of Sustainable Development Goal 14 on conserving and sustainably using the oceans – whether in support of navigational safety, protection of the marine environment, coastal zone management, defence and security, resource exploration.   Lim highlighted that, since 2002, governments signed up to IMO’s International Convention on the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) are required to provide and maintain hydrographic services and products. 

Photo: Teledyne CARIS

Swedish Hydrographic Office Implements CARIS Production System

Teledyne CARIS said its Hydrographic Production Database (HPD) has been implemented as the Swedish Maritime Administration (SMA) production system, replacing the legacy software previously employed by SMA for the management of spatial data.   The SMA is responsible for accessibility and safety in the Swedish waters. Services include but are not limited to, pilotage, icebreaking, maritime traffic information, maritime and aeronautical search and rescue and hydrography.   HPD supports the creation of paper and electronic charts, special publications and data services and has been customized

Nautilus Minerals to Test Seafloor Mining Tools

 Nautilus Minerals to Trial Seafloor Mining Tools   Canada based Nautilus Minerals Inc. said its Seafloor Production Tools have arrived in Papua New Guinea (PNG), and will shortly commence submerged trials.   Nautilus’ CEO Mike Johnston said, “We are delighted to be undertaking submerged trials in PNG. The trials will result in money and investment going into the PNG economy, and the employment of Papua New Guineans in state-of-the-art technology which are some of the key benefits of seafloor production. The trials also allow us to work closely with our partner Petromin

Image: Kongsberg

Kongsberg Launches Complete Survey Vessel

pole with pre-installed motion sensor, GPS heading & position system and sound velocity sensor. The operator uses a console mounted ruggedised laptop to plan and control the survey. The vessel is even equipped with a VHF radio and is coastguard approved for use at sea with an International Marine Certificate.   By design, the GeoSwath CSV is effective in a wide range of shallow survey applications. Its shallow draft, high top speed and manoeuvrability combined with the stability of a catamaran hull make it ideal for use in both marine surveys and on canals, river and lakes. The ability

CNO Tours Newest Oceanographic Survey Ship

Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson toured the Navy's newest oceanographic survey ship, USNS Maury (T-AGS 66), April 8 to gain a better understanding of the oceanographic information the ship provides to the Department of Defense.    The CNO is the senior military officer of the Department of the Navy and is responsible for the command, utilization of resources and operating efficiency of the Navy.   "Naval forces require information about the physical environment to operate safely and effectively," said Rear Adm. Tim Gallaudet, oceanographer of the Navy

A diver surveys the wreck of Lucinda Van Valkenburg, a wooden three-masted schooner that sank just north of Middle Island in 1887. (Photo: Tane Casserley/NOAA)

History Meets Technology in Shipwreck Alley

The vast stretches of cold, fresh water in the Great Lakes hide the stories of thousands of ships that wrecked in our nation’s inland seas. Historical records indicate more than a hundred shipwrecks have yet to be discovered in Lake Huron’s Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary, and research teams hope to discover more this summer.   From April through August, Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary will lead four different teams using advanced technologies to push the boundaries of underwater archaeological survey and seek yet-to-be-discovered shipwrecks within the sanctuary.  

Joint hydrographic and seabed characterization survey in coastal waters off Davis station, Antarctica. (Photo: Royal Australian Navy)

Australian Scientists Study the Antarctic

Australian scientists recently concluded several Antarctic geoscience and geophysical data acquisition surveys in hopes of helping to increase understanding of these precious environments to better manage and protect them. Geoscience Australia's Antarctic Geoscience program, which carries out marine and onshore research for the Australian government, has completed three Antarctic surveys during the 2016-2017 field season. Three Geoscience Australia marine specialists, Dr. Jodie Smith, Kim Picard and Ian Atkinson, were part of a two month survey of the near-shore region near Australia's Davis

NovAtel Unveils Oceanix Nearshore Service

Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) positioning technology, has unveiled its Oceanix Nearshore correction service at Ocean Business in Southampton, UK.   Oceanix Nearshore, a subscription-based GNSS correction service for Precise Point Positioning (PPP), provides sub-decimetre positioning for marine applications such as dredging, hydrographic survey, mapping and coastal patrolling. The robustness of Oceanix infrastructure sets it apart from the competition. Oceanix precise corrections data is generated utilizing a network of over 80 strategically located GNSS reference stations globally

Underwater GPS Developer Kit (Photo courtesy of Blue Robotics)

Water Linked Launches Underwater GPS System

Norwegian technology supplier Water Linked has launched a new Underwater GPS system that leverages traditional GPS along with Water Linked’s unique underwater acoustic positioning technology.   Designed to enable underwater positioning in a wide new range of marine technology applications, this system is priced at $4,800, half the cost of existing underwater positioning systems. The Underwater GPS Developer Kit is available for order with the first deliveries expected in June 2017. California-based Blue Robotics is the first partner to integrate the Water Linked Underwater GPS

Sir George Zambellas (Photo: Mark Rawlings / MOD)

Zambellas to Join Liquid Robotics Advisory Board

multinational exercise of a real-life, large-scale interoperability of unmanned and autonomous systems. Lauded as ground breaking, it was during this exercise where Boeing and Liquid Robotics demonstrated the first time that a network of persistent USVs were able to detect, track and report a live submarine in a naval demonstration.    "I'm delighted to be able to support Liquid Robotics,” said Sir George Zambellas. “This responsibility will hit the sweet spot for me, combining deceptively advanced technology with extraordinary development potential, in the challenging underwater

Photo: Phoenix

US Navy ROV Gets a New Assignment

made of titanium and a user friendly control system that employs programmable logic controller (PLC) technology with graphic user interface software capabilities.   Soon after the ROV’s completion, representatives of the U.S. Navy’s Undersea Rescue Command (URC) and NAVSEA Submarine Escape & Rescue Program Office (PMS 391) were briefed on Hydros as a potential replacement for the Navy’s one-atmosphere diving system (ADS2000) for assessment of a disabled submarine, rescue hatch clearance and attachment of the submarine rescue chamber’s downhaul cable. Subsequently

Photo: CMRE

NATO Science Mission Employs ‘Double Muscle’

Commencing on her first NATO sea trial of the year, the NATO research vessel (NRV) Alliance has sailed out with new assets on board that aim to enhance collaborative robotics for MCM applications, including a new vehicle, which only apparently duplicates the CMRE MUSCLE prototype. On the aft deck of the NRV Alliance, sailing for the first CMRE (Centre for Maritime Research and Experimentation) scientific campaign of 2017, there are two very similar robots. One is the MUSCLE vehicle, a reliable prototype developed by CMRE for seabed mapping with automatic behavior capabilities. The other is not just

The worksite (Image: DOF Subsea UK)

Next-Generation Subsea Metrology: Better Measurements, Fast

the 3D laser data with precise underwater acoustic and inertial navigation information, it is now possible to generate centimeter resolution engineering models from which accurate measurements can be instantaneously and repeatably captured.   Shared Knowledge & Communication In conventional marine construction support terminology, metrology is the work done by surveyors and ROV to acquire various subsea measurements, typically between flanges on separate pieces of subsea infrastructure. These measurements allow precise fabrication of subsea jumpers and spool-pieces.   Traditionally

(Photo: Schmidt Ocean Institute)

Uncharted Depths: Exploring the Marianas with SuBastian

ocean.    With some areas reaching depths more than 36,000 feet, scientists rely on a range of pioneering deep-sea technologies to survey the unexplored regions of the Mariana Trench. In 1987, the submersible Alvin was the first to visit the nearby Mariana Back-arc, a zone of highly active submarine volcanism and hydrothermal vents hidden 13,000 feet below the ocean’s surface. After returning to the Back-arc 30 years later equipped with the Schmidt Ocean Institute’s new underwater vehicle SuBastian, scientists can now fill gaps in our understanding about the biogeography of these

U.S. Navy mine test targets being readied for Knifefish at-sea mine-hunting evaluation (Photo: General Dynamics Mission Systems)

US Navy Tests UUV for Mine-hunting Operations

The General Dynamics Mission Systems Knifefish team completed a comprehensive evaluation of Knifefish, an autonomous surface mine countermeasure (SMCM) unmanned undersea vehicle (UUV). In coordination with the U.S. Navy, the test events took place off the coast of Boston using submerged Navy mine test targets. The evaluation represents a significant milestone in the Knifefish program and demonstrates the UUV’s capability to detect and classify potential mines, at a variety of depths, each posing a unique threat to naval vessels operating in a mission area.   “The information and

Image: Fugro

Hunting for Hydrocarbon Seeps in the Gulf of Mexico

In collaboration with multi-client geoscience data company, TGS, Fugro continues to map the seafloor in the Gulf of Mexico to pull together a complete picture of geological features, including hydrocarbon seeps.   This latest survey, Otos, follows the completion of another TGS industry-funded Gigante survey in 2016, on the Mexican side of the 1,500-kilometer wide Gulf. Fugro has deployed two state-of-the-art geophysical survey vessels to acquire multibeam echo sounder (MBES) and sub-bottom profile data over the western, central and eastern regions of the United States’ continental slope.

Irving Shipbuilding Invests in Ocean Technology Programs

Irving Shipbuilding Inc. said it has made a multimillion dollar investment to support marine innovation and commercialization in Nova Scotia and across Canada.    The shipbuilder is investing $4.52 million in the newly established Centre for Ocean Ventures and Entrepreneurship (COVE), an ocean innovation centre to be located on the waterfront in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. The investment over the next five years represents the largest private sector contribution COVE has received to date.    At COVE, ocean science research, start-ups, R&D-intensive companies, industry and Nova

Photo: 2G Robotics

New Underwater Laser Scanner from 2G Robotics

2G Robotics said it will publicly launch its new underwater laser scanning solution, the ULS-500 PRO, at the April 2017 Ocean Business Exhibition in Southampton, U.K.   Now ready for market after several months of development and testing, the ULS-500 PRO will replace the ULS-500 for high resolution subsea survey. With better accuracy and real-time data acquisition, the new ULS-500 PRO improves upon 2G Robotics’ dynamic underwater laser scanning solution by increasing the ease with which surveys can be performed.   The ULS-500 PRO’s sample rates facilitate faster vehicle

Trimble to Distribute Teledyne's PDS Software

Trimble partners with Teledyne Marine to distribute its software for construction, hydrographic survey and dredging operations   A new agreement will see Trimble distribute a branded version of Teledyne's PDS software package for hydrographic survey, construction and dredging operations—Trimble Marine Construction Software. The software provides measurement and positioning to improve marine construction efficiency and safety.   According to Trimble, its Trimble Marine Construction Software expands its portfolio and extends its connected approach for marine construction companies to

Govt. Funds Help OceanWorks Improve Its Junction Boxes

It’s a go ahead for new design development and configuration for the established OceanWorks International observatory communication nodes, thanks to approved funding from The National Research Council of Canada Industrial Research Assistance Program (NRC-IRAP).   The OceanWorks Subsea Instrument Interface Modules (SIIM), or junction boxes originally were developed for the Ocean Networks Canada (ONC) Neptune and Venus observatories, where they have been in place since 2006. There is a total of 14 junction boxes that have been delivered to ONC for deployment on both Neptune and Venus.

UK NOC Joins World Ocean Council

, oil and gas, seabed mining, renewable energy, ocean technology, maritime law, investment and other sectors. NOC Executive Director, Professor Ed Hill, commented, “The NOC is delighted to become a member of the World Ocean Council. We share the same aim of ensuring the sustainable use of the marine environment by the businesses active in the maritime space. With the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development predicting that the blue economy will more than double its contribution to global value added, reaching over $3 trillion by 2030, strong growth is expected. “A key

Domenti Apakidze on the Black Sea with his JW Fishers side scan sonar (Photo: JW Fishers)

Sonar Systems Help Search Teams, Scientists and Salvors

 A variety of sonar systems are now being used by law enforcement and public safety dive teams, universities and salvage companies for recovery operations, subsea surveys and marine research. Sonars produce almost photographic images of the underwater environment regardless of water clarity. Side scan sonar can sweep several hundred feet of ocean, lake, or river bottom in one pass of the boat allowing large areas to be searched or surveyed quickly. Scanning sonar, which operates in water similar to the way radar operates in air, can image a 200 foot circle on the bottom in less than a minute.

KATFISH undergoing sea trials in Conception Bay South, Newfoundland in February 2017 (Photo: Kraken Sonar)

KATFISH Completes Phase One Sea Trials

Kraken Sonar Inc. said it has successfully completed phase one sea trials of its KATFISH towed Synthetic Aperture Sonar system.   Karl Kenny, Kraken’s President and CEO, said, “These are exciting times in the underwater robotics industry. Customers are starting to fully understand the cost and risk mitigation benefits of unmanned systems. Both military and commercial markets are showing encouraging growth as they are now incorporating unmanned vehicles and intelligent sensors in their procurement plans and budgets. In fact, industry analysts Market Info Group estimates that the

WHOI scientists used deep-sea vehicles, including Sentry to locate the voyage data recorder (above) from the El Faro on the seafloor 15,000 feet deep. The VDR offers clues to understand why the ship tragically sank in 2015, killing 33 crew members aboard. (Photo: NTSB)

Why Did the El Faro Sink?

Deep-sea vehicles locate data recorder on the seafloor   On October 1, 2015, the 790-foot cargo ship El Faro sank near the Bahamas during Hurricane Joaquin. All 33 crew members died in the tragedy. The ship was equipped with a voyage data recorder, or VDR, that could reveal clues to understand what happened, but it was lost in the depths.   The VDR was mounted on the mast on the ship’s navigation bridge. A search expedition mounted in October located the wreck and discovered that the bridge had separated from the hull. Days later, when the search team located the bridge, the mast

Jason program manager Matt Heintz helps test Jason on the WHOI dock. (Photo by Tom Kleindinst, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

After Overhaul, Jason Is Stronger Than Ever

Since it was first launched in 1988, the remotely operated vehicle Jason has been a workhorse for oceanographic scientists, hauling instruments, conducting experiments, collecting samples, and taking images in the depths. In April 2015, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution engineers gave Jason its first major overhaul since 2002, increasing its payload and capabilities and streamlining its operations. The team stripped Jason down to its base, replacing its frame and redesigning its systems. During missions, pilots operate Jason in real time from a control van on a ship via a .842-inch-thick

Modus unveils Saab Sabretooth for cost effective survey, inspection

Modus Seabed Intervention has successfully completed trialling one of the subsea industry’s first commercially available hybrid unmanned underwater vehicles. It will be one of the first autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) to feature the capabilities and characteristics of a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). In partnership with Saab Dynamics, Modus has developed the Saab Sabretooth to offer greater endurance and speed, and is also developing advanced sensor payload packages and operating methodologies. The vehicle is expected to contribute to more cost-effective survey and inspection projects

Fugro will use its deepwater survey expertise to support the Shell Ocean Discovery XPRIZE with high resolution bathymetry data of the competition area. (Image: Fugro)

Ocean Mapping: Fugro Partner with Shell on X-Prize

, the competition offers a special $1M incentive sponsored by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for systems that can also detect and track biological and chemical signals. Such advancements would improve emergency response and foster the discovery and monitoring of new marine life and underwater communities.   First round testing for semi-finalist teams is scheduled to commence in September 2017. Fugro will acquire, process and deliver the high resolution baseline datasets in advance

The multi-beam Sonar takes the highly-desired capability to scan port to starboard under the vessel and adds Furuno’s commercial fisheries spin on it. Image courtesy Furuno

Furuno's Multi-Beam Sonar reaches new depths

Furuno is proud to announce that it is bringing side-scanning capabilities to its flagship NavNet TZtouch and TZtouch2 MFDs with its latest network sensor called the DFF3D. This multi-beam Sonar takes the highly-desired capability to scan port to starboard under the vessel and adds Furuno’s commercial fisheries spin on it. This deep-water Sonar delivers a sidebar detection range of an unprecedented 650+ feet, while being able to see down to over 1,000 feet. The DFF3D utilizes a new, compact multi-beam transducer, along with Furuno’s own advanced signal processing, to produce eye-popping

Image: XPRIZE

Shell Ocean Discovery XPRIZE Semifinalists Announced

Lehigh Tide (Bethlehem, PA, United States) – Led by Matthew Ciolino - The Lehigh University team is creating a cost-effective autonomous underwater vehicle that can accurately scan the ocean. Ocean Quest (San Jose, CA, United States) – Led by Danny Kim, the team endeavors to design a marine STEM platform for students worldwide to enable project-based learning with new technology and techniques. Oceanzus (Durham, NH, United States) – Led by James Case, the team is creating a continuous operating platform that supports multiple survey assets to realize the mapping goal.

Marine Technology Magazine Cover Jun 2017 - Hydrographic Survey

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