Noaas Office Of Ocean Exploration And Research News

Image courtesy of the NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program

#Oi2020 History: ROV D2

Originally created for industrial use--such as internal and external underwater pipeline inspections--ROVs have become a mainstay within underwater exploration, as well as many other scientific applications. To continue the research and technology within this area of subsea development, NOAA’s Office of Ocean Exploration and Research (OER) in 2013 introduced a new ROV, the Deep Discoverer, or “D2.” The ROV, (also known as D2) which operates from NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer, is unique in that it is one of the few ROVs capable of diving to 3.7 miles (6,000 meters). Measuring 10 x 6.

Choctaw. Photo: Ocean Explorer, NOAA

Two Shipwrecks Found in Lake Huron

 NOAA maritime archaeologists and partners have located and identified two previously undiscovered historic shipwrecks in Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary. The shipwrecks are the wooden steamer Ohio (1873-1894) and the steel-hulled steamer Choctaw (1892-1915).   In May 2017, a sanctuary-led expedition used high-resolution sonars to map the bottom of Lake Huron, during which they located the two ships.  At the time, researchers were confident they had discovered the 202-foot Ohio and the 266-foot Choctaw.  The team recently confirmed the vessels’ identities using

Phase IV started with a series of ‘work-up’ dives used to practice technical diving techniques and refine the photogrammetric imagery acquisition protocols before visiting deeper sites. Here, NOAA Diver Joe Hoyt swims above the debris field off the stern of wooden bulk carrier New Orleans. He maintains a consistent altitude off the bottom, necessary to ensure broader coverage of the debris field features as the relate to the main vessel remains. (Credit: NOAA, Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctua

Cutting Edge Tech Helps Find Lake Huron Shipwrecks

Researchers at NOAA’s Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary have recently completed a four-phase research project to test the application of technology to locate, document and explore shipwrecks lost in Lake Huron. Under a grant from NOAA’s Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary assembled an interdisciplinary team of researchers from around the country to support an expedition based from the sanctuary’s Great Lakes Maritime Heritage Center in Alpena, Mich.    Thunder Bay’s superintendent, Jeff Gray, summarized the importance

This stunningly beautiful jellyfish was seen in the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument while exploring the informally named “Enigma Seamount” at a depth of about 3,700 meters. Scientists identified this hydromedusa as belonging to the genus Crossota. (Credit: NOAA)

NOAA's Okeanos Explorer Journeys Into Pacific Deepwater

The NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer will send a remotely operated vehicle into deepwater protected areas of the central Pacific Ocean this week – and you can follow along live online. Using the Deep Discoverer ROV, scientists will investigate deepwater habitats, geology, and the biology of sea animals as it dives as far as 3.7 miles (6,000 meters) deep. The 2017 explorations will run through September and are part of the third and final year of NOAA’s Campaign to Address Pacific monument Science, Technology, and Ocean NEeds, known as CAPSTONE, a major multi-year science initiative focusing

NOAA's Okeanos Explorer Journeys Into Pacific Deepwater

The NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer will send a remotely operated vehicle into deepwater protected areas of the central Pacific Ocean this week – and you can follow along live online. Using the Deep Discoverer ROV, scientists will investigate deepwater habitats, geology, and the biology of sea animals as it dives as far as 3.7 miles (6,000 meters) deep. The 2017 explorations will run through September and are part of the third and final year of NOAA’s Campaign to Address Pacific monument Science, Technology, and Ocean NEeds, known as CAPSTONE, a major multi-year science initiative focusing

Okeanos Explorer (Photo: NOAA)

Exploring Protected Areas and Shipwrecks in the Pacific

Watch real time exploration of deep sea corals, sponges and World War II aircraft carrier   NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer began a series of expeditions on February 25 to explore America's vast marine protected areas in the central and western Pacific Ocean. Scientists will use unmanned remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) that can dive down 3.7 miles to explore never-before-seen deepwater habitats and minerals, marine animals and potentially, a World War II aircraft carrier. The dives will be broadcast live from the seafloor, allowing the public to watch in real-time.   "Watching our ROV

Features on a photo of USS Independence CVL 22 are captured in a 3D low-resolution sonar image of the shipwreck in Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. The Coda Octopus Echoscope 3D sonar, integrated on the Boeing AUV Echo Ranger, imaged the shipwreck during the first maritime archaeological survey. The sonar image with oranges color tones (lower) shows an outline of a possible airplane in the forward aircraft elevator hatch opening. (Credit: NOAA, Boeing, and Coda Octopus)

'Amazingly Intact' WWII-era Aircraft Carrier Surveyed

NOAA, working with private industry partners and the U.S. Navy, has confirmed the location and condition of the USS Independence, the lead ship of its class of light aircraft carriers that were critical during the American naval offensive in the Pacific during World War II.   Resting in 2,600 feet of water off California's Farallon Islands, the carrier is "amazingly intact," said NOAA scientists, with its hull and flight deck clearly visible, and what appears to be a plane in the carrier's hangar bay.   Independence (CVL 22) operated in the central and western Pacific from

Okeanos Explorer's dual-body ROV system is loaded from the aftdeck of the ship into the water before conducting an exploration dive. (Credit: NOAA)

NOAA to Explore Depths of Caribbean Sea

Public can watch seafloor discoveries live online April 9-30. Beginning April 9, scientists aboard NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer will begin a series of 20 dives to investigate previously unseen depths of the Caribbean Sea and Atlantic Ocean – and the public can follow along online. During dives that are expected to go as deep as 3.7 miles, a sophisticated unmanned submarine, called a remotely operated vehicle, or ROV, will broadcast live video from the seafloor, allowing anyone with Internet access to watch the expedition as it unfolds. “We’ll be exploring an area of the United

NOAA Ocean Exploration Federal Funding Opportunity

NOAA’s Office of Ocean Exploration and Research (OER) is seeking pre-proposals (required) and, ultimately, full proposals to support its mission, consistent with NOAA's Next Generation Strategic Plan, to search, investigate and document poorly-known and unknown ocean areas through interdisciplinary exploration, and to advance and disseminate knowledge of the ocean environment and its physical, chemical, archaeological and biological resources. Competitive ocean exploration proposals will be bold, innovative and interdisciplinary in their approach. NOAA OER anticipates a total of approximately

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