Marine Technology Reporter Blogs - lars

Understanding ROV Launch and Recovery Systems – Part 2

January 19, 2015

th John Thomson cat storm
The main purpose of the heavy weather launch and recovery system is to stabilize and centralize the WCROV (Work Class ROV) and Tether Management System (TMS) with a device called a cursor which restricts horizontal movement while transitioning through the air/sea interface (called the splash zone). The splash zone presents the greatest risk of damage to the WCROV, TMS, and potentially the vessel. Large waves and high winds can cause the ROV and TMS to swing wildly, potentially impacting the vessel structure. As the vehicle is raised, this motion is amplified many times, which can make it difficult if not impossible to launch/recover the WCROV in foul weather. Another hazard is the close proximity of the WCROV to vessel hull mounted thrusters during entry and exit into the splash zone.

Understanding ROV Launch and Recovery Systems – Part 1

January 19, 2015

Compact WCROV lauching system
ROV system are vital to oil and gap E&P beyond saturation diving maximum depths. Full saturation diving has been conducted to depths of nearly 600 meters (2,000 feet). Beyond this depth ROVs are employed to undertake the diver’s tasks such as opening and closing valves, construction and equipment monitoring. In order to be deployed from the surface by support vessels, ROVs must be launched, recovered, and safely and efficiently operated using dedicated systems. Two systems are needed to successfully launch, recover and operate and ROV, these are the LARS (Launch and Recovery System) and TMS (Tether Management System). ROVs may be directly deployed from a simple crane…

Submarine Rescue Systems

July 30, 2014

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The U.S. Navy has the world's most comprehensive rescue system for submarines in distress. It is capable of rendering assistance to submarines down to 2000 feet (609.6 meters), anywhere in the world. This system is unique in that it allows the submariners in distress to board a remote controlled rescue diving recompression system in groups of sixteen crewmembers and be brought up to the surface. The U.S. Phoenix International Holdings, Inc. is contracted for the operation and maintenance of the US Navy’s Submarine Rescue Systems, in conjunction with Navy personnel. Phoenix has the responsibility for carrying out any rescue operation, and maintaining a state of readiness for immediate worldwide deployment on a 24/7 basis.