Oceanography News

 Photo by Michael Fox, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Study: How Much of Corals’ Nutrition Comes From Hunting

algae living inside of them, but if those algae aren’t creating enough sustenance, corals can use their tentacles to grab and eat tiny prey swimming nearby.A new study from researchers at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), the University of New Mexico, and Scripps Institution of Oceanography is revealing that more of corals’ nutrients come from this sort of hunting than previously expected, information that may help predict the fate of coral reefs as global ocean temperatures rise. The study published Sept. 17, 2019, in the journal Functional Ecology.“When you have a heat

Crab Comms: "It's not hunger pains, I just want to talk ..."

Scientists Discover New Method of Communication in Crabs: Ghost crabs use structure in their stomach to communicate when agitated.  Researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and the University of California Berkeley have discovered a new method of communication in the Atlantic ghost crab, Ocypode quadrata. The findings were published September 11 in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences.Using a combination of research methods, the scientists found that Atlantic ghost crabs – native to the western Atlantic

The bespoke drill rig being lowered over the side of the RRS James Cook. The rig is designed to push the curved steel pipe into the seabed sediment. Image: Copyright STEMM-CCS Project

Increased Confidence in CO2 Storage

, to observe how the gas behaves in sediments and the water column above, and predict how far leaks may spread and what impacts they might have - but this time in as near to ‘real’ conditions as possible. During May this year, a research expedition set sail from the UK’s National Oceanography Centre in Southampton, aboard the RRS James Cook. Once on station, close to Shell’s Goldeneye platform approximately 100km off the coast of Scotland and in 120m water depth, the experiment began. A pipe was robotically inserted into the seabed - the first time such an experiment has been

A crowd gathers to hear speeches and presentations during the Advanced Naval Technology Exercise (ANTX) 2019 held on Aug. 29 at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Newport's Narragansett Bay Test Facility. ANTX 2019 demonstrates the future of Navy technologies in a low-risk environment before they become integrated in the fleet. This year's theme was Prepare For Battle: Undersea Superiority. (by Rich Allen, McLaughlin Research Corp.)

NUWC TECH Capabilities on Display at ANTX 2019

a ceremony Thursday afternoon during ANTX 2019, the fifth iteration of the event designed to promote innovation and collaboration across government, industry and academia in an effort to evolve the state of the art for emerging fleet technologies. U.S. Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse; Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command (CNMOC) Technical Director Dr. William Burnett; Don Hoffer, Executive Director, Submarine Forces; Division Newport Technical Director Ronald Vien; and Division Newport Commanding Officer Capt. Michael Coughlin also joined Pryor on the dais.“I am super proud of ANTX. I love this show

Image Courtesy: National Oceanography Centre (UK)

MTR100: National Oceanography Centre (UK)

National Oceanography Centre (UK)Southampton, UKPresident/CEO: Ed Hill OBENo. of Employees: 620www.noc.ac.ukThe National Oceanography Center (NOC) is the UK’s leading institution for integrated coastal and deep ocean research. NOC undertakes and facilitates world-class, agenda-setting scientific research to understand the global ocean by solving challenging multidisciplinary, large scale, long-term marine science problems to underpin international and UK public policy, business and wider societal outcomes. At the Marine Robotics Innovation Center in Southampton, the NOC hosts a community of 28

Seawater temperature measurements taken at Scripps Pier. (Photo Credit: Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego)

#Oi2020 History

During the summer of 2018, a research team at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego logged in the warmest sea surface temperature at the Ellen Browning Scripps Memorial Pier. According to Scripps, the logged temperature was 78.6 degrees Fahrenheit—the highest since recording began in August 1916—and the same year Scripps researchers began sea-surface temperature and salinity readings at the pier.In 1925, Scripps began taking seafloor water temperature measurements, and the daily collection is still completed by hand and maintained by the institution&rs

Image Courtesy Teledyne Marine

MTR100: Teledyne Marine

broad area search with side-scan sonar, hydrographic survey with multibeam and sub bottom profiler, and high resolution inspection survey with camera and acoustic sonar. These surveys support applications such as search and recovery, salvage, exploration, construction support, marine archaeology, and oceanography.The SeaRaptor. Image: Teledyne MarineThe vehicle offers several payload ports that provide serial communication, Ethernet and power.These ports can be used for field-swappable sensors. In addition, removable batteries and data storage enable rapid turn-around to maximize operating time.The newly

R/V Roger Revelle Gets a Thruster Upgrade

of telescoping thruster technology from ZF Marine.The R/V Roger Revelle is a globally capable oceanographic research vessel, designed as a platform to support many different facets of ocean-based scientific research. The vessel is owned by the US Navy and operated by the Scripps Institute of Oceanography under a charter agreement with the Office of Naval Research.  In the pursuit of its mission, the crew of the R/V Roger Revelle depends on world-class navigation and station-keeping systems on a daily basis.  To meet this need the vessel was built with a powerful propulsion system designed

Photo Credit: National Oceanography Centre

#Oi2020 History

In June 2010, it was announced by the National Oceanography Centre that its robot submarine-- Autosub3--was instrumental in the Centre’s study on the reasons behind the steady thinning of a vast glacier in Western Antarctica over recent decades. The now-retired robot submarine was deployed deep beneath a floating ice shelf by scientists investigating the thinning and acceleration of Pine Island Glacier. The study was led by Dr. Adrian Jenkins of the British Antarctic Survey (BAS), and also involved scientists from NOC in Southampton and the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO) in the US.

Dr. Matthew Asplin (Photo: ASL Enviromental Sciences)

ASL Hires Dr. Asplin

ASL Environmental Sciences appointed Dr. Matthew Asplin to the position of Metocean and Arctic Project Manager. Dr. Asplin brings a diverse set of multidisciplinary research skills in meteorology, sea ice, and oceanography, and has over 15 years of experience in these fields.  He will be responsible for project management and client liaison tasks for projects across these disciplines, and will also be active in responding to business development opportunities and academic collaborations, as well as expanding new consulting services to ASL's present clients. Dr. Asplin will also be active

Marine Technology Magazine Cover Sep 2019 - Autonomous Vehicle Operations

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