Oceanography News

Photo courtesy of GlobalStar

Drifter Buoys Aid Seaweed Research

how the Sargassum moves in this region.”“Today’s climate emergency demands that we gain deeper understanding about how our oceans are changing,” said Gary King, SPOT Regional Sales Manager EMEA at Globalstar. “Many hundreds of SPOT Trace GPS trackers are now involved in oceanography studies around the globe, helping drive informed decision-making on plastic pollution, oil spills and more, and we believe this scientific use of our reliable satellite technology will only grow further.&rdquo

Photo by Paul Humann, copyright Grouper Moon Project

Conservation for Endangered Reef Fish Yields Results

Nassau Grouper populations increased threefold in response to dynamic fishing management actions in the Cayman IslandsA new study from researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego has documented a successful recovery effort among Nassau Grouper populations in the Cayman Islands thanks to an approach involving government agencies, academic researchers, and nonprofit organizations.The study, published January 6, 2020 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, used a two-pronged approach including tagging and video census data for monitoring

Photo:  Marine Technology Society

MTS Appoints Dr. Josh Kohut as VP

teams of graduate and undergraduate students in the field,” said MTS President Dr. Rick Spinrad. “He’ll be a great addition to the MTS Board of Directors.”Kohut graduated cum laude in 1997 with a B.S. in physics from the College of Charleston and earned his Ph.D. in physical oceanography from Rutgers University in 2002. Kohut was an early adopter of HF Radar and underwater glider technologies and has remained at the forefront of their development, operation and use.Perhaps the most scientifically significant of Josh’s technology applications was the glider he deployed ahead

(Photo: Maddie Hunt Photography
/ Armstrong Marine)

Research Vessel Delivered to Orca Maritime

. The vessel will enter service immediately, beginning with a week-long operation around San Clemente Island.The second IPS-drive catamaran delivered by Armstrong, the 4216-CTC model was selected by Orca Maritime after the builder delivered the same design to UC San Diego’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography (R/V Bob and Betty Beyster) in 2019.Orca Maritime will utilize the workboat in support of Department of Defense initiatives, environmental agencies, energy sectors, and commercial enterprise. Vessel operations will include the launch and recovery of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV), underwater

MTS Welcomes Two New Board Members

develops and maintains positive and productive relationships with academic institutions, laboratories—both public and private—and research institutes and helps develop opportunities for students.Miller earned his B.S. in Marine Science from the University of South Carolina, his M.S. in Oceanography from the University of Rhode Island, and his Ph.D. in Meteorology and Physical Oceanography from the University of Miami. He is the president of Science for Decisions, a consulting practice which he founded in 2013 to ensure that solid science is available to inform decisions that impact people

A REMUS vehicle shows the traditional four element DVL array (Photo Courtesy Hydroid)

ADCPs & DVLs: Recent Tech Developments

an automatic cloud-based service. In addition to these adaptations for the instrument itself Nortek took the development one step further and designed a compact buoy and timed-release system to simplify deployment in shallow waters.ADCPs and DVLs are arguably one of the foremost enablers of both oceanography and undersea robotics. While they are not a new technology, their evolution has been rapid in recent years. New array designs, ever increasing diversity in frequency range, and novel configurations have come on scene quickly. Innovations inspired by current consumer tech, including apps and cloud

Longfin squid (Doryteuthis pealeii) are an important species in the east coast squid fishery, which is valued at about $40 million per year. (Photo by Ian Jones, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

Ocean Noise: Pile Driving Triggers Alarm Responses in Squid

.“This study is the first to report behavioral effects of pile driving noise on any cephalopod, a group including squid, cuttlefish, and octopuses,” says lead author Ian Jones, a student in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology-Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program in Oceanography.Squid use natural alarm and defense behaviors like inking, jetting, and changing color and patterns on their skin for communication and also for survival when they’re trying to avoid capture. Squids’ changeable skin gives them the ability to create extraordinary camouflage, enabling

Sonardyne International Ltd. and National Oceanography Centre staff completed the P3AUV trials at Loch Ness, Scotland, this week. (Photo: Sonardyne)

AUV Project Boosts Endurance, Navigation Capabilities

has delivered a step-change in unmanned platform endurance and navigational precision.The £1.4 million ($1.8 million) Precise Positioning for Persistent Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (P3AUV) project, led by subsea technology specialist Sonardyne International Ltd., with partners the National Oceanography Center (NOC) and L3Harris, and part funded by Innovate UK, has set new standards for long-endurance underwater navigation and automated subsea positioning of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV).In addition, the project also set out to increase the use of autonomy in offshore survey positioning

Photo Courtesy of National Oceanography Centre

#Oi2020 History

 In 2015, researchers at the National Oceanography Center (NOC) used Royal Navy submarine data to investigate the nature of turbulence in the ocean beneath the Arctic sea-ice. This is mainly because recent decreases in Arctic sea ice may have a big impact on the circulation, chemistry and biology of the Arctic Ocean, because of ice-free waters becoming more turbulent. By revealing more about how these turbulent motions distribute energy within the ocean, the findings from this study provide information important for accurate predictions of the future of the Arctic Ocean. The melting of Arctic

(Image: Fugro)

New Tech Aids US Navy Mapping

Rapid Airborne Multibeam Mapping System (RAMMS), showcased last week during a Naval Oceanography event held at Southern Mississippi’s Marine Research Center, has resulted in improved maritime domain awareness for the US Navy, and demonstrates the value of federal investments in private-sector research, development and commercialization efforts.RAMMS is based on Areté’s Pushbroom Imaging Littoral Lidar System (PILLS), an airborne seabed mapping capability developed through a US Navy Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. One of the primary yet challenging goals of SBIR

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