Oceanography News

Members of Professor David Barclay’s lab deploy an underwater acoustic reader. Copyright: David Barclay

Dalhousie University: Quiet Oceans Speak Volumes During Lockdown

Research at Dalhousie University shows that a quieter ocean—courtesy of the current COVID-19 pandemic lockdown—can benefit marine life, particularly those listed on the endangered species list, like killer whales.David Barclay, an assistant professor in the Department of Oceanography, and researchers in his lab took advantage of the current lockdown to explore how the underwater soundscape has changed during the pandemic. Oceans Network Canada, a University of Victoria initiative that operates ocean observatories in the northeast Pacific Ocean and the Salish Sea, provided hydrophones that

A close up of the bionic skeleton of the 3D-printed coral structures, which were used to grow algae.© Daniel Wangpraseurt

Scripps Institution of Oceanography: 3D-printed Coral Are Natural Producers of Biofuels

Researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego, alongside the University of Cambridge, UK, have 3D printed coral-like structures capable of growing dense microscopic algae populations. The work is aimed at the development of compact, efficient bioreactors for producing algae-based biofuels and could lead to a better understanding of the coral-algae relationship, with the hopes of establishing techniques to repair and restore reefs.Author Daniel Wangpraseurt, whose work was published April 9, 2020 in Nature Communications, explained, “Cor

(Image: NOC)

Fast-moving Waterfalls in the Deep Sea

New research led by the National Oceanography Center (NOC) has discovered how fast-moving waterfalls under the sea control the shape and behavior of submarine channels. These underwater channels are the offshore equivalents of rivers, but can be much larger. Submarine channels can extend for tens to thousands of kilometers offshore, providing an important conduit for the transfer of sediment, nutrients and pollutants, such as microplastics, to the deep-sea. Avalanches of sediment that flow down these channels also pose a hazard to networks of seafloor cables that underpin global communications,

'Unusual' Underwater Rivers Found Along Australia's Coastline

from UWA’s Oceans Graduate School and Oceans Institute said usually satellites were used to track surface features such as river plumes, but because the water flow was below the surface it was undetected until ocean gliders were deployed.“This is the most significant discovery for coastal oceanography in recent decades, not only in Australia but globally,” Professor Pattiaratchi said.UWA co-author Dr Yasha Hetzel said simultaneous cooling of near-shore waters across the whole of Australia from heat loss had not been documented before.“The coastal ocean is the receiving basin for

A close up of the bionic skeleton of the 3D-printed coral structures, which were used to grow algae. © Daniel Wangpraseurt

Scripps Institution of Oceanography: 3D-printed Coral Are Natural Producers of Biofuels

Researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego, alongside the University of Cambridge, UK, have 3D printed coral-like structures capable of growing dense microscopic algae populations. The work is aimed at the development of compact, efficient bioreactors for producing algae-based biofuels and could lead to a better understanding of the coral-algae relationship, with the hopes of establishing techniques to repair and restore reefs.Author Daniel Wangpraseurt, whose work was published April 9, 2020 in Nature Communications, explained, “Cor

Graphic representation of the exercise; met-ocean data collection operations running concurrently with simulated threats, detection and mitigation assets. Image from ION.

Autonomous ANTX: Seismic Survey Tech and Port Security

could be relevant to other markets. The idea that it could support naval assets came up within the last couple of years and resulted in ION getting involved in ANTX. The event is run every year by the Naval Undersea Warfare Center (NUWC) out of Newport, Rhode Island, and CNMOC (Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command), based at Stennis, MS.For ANTX 2019, ION proposed a joint exercise with AutoNaut, a UK based wave propelled unmanned surface vessel (USV) developer, part of the Seiche group of companies, to address the ANTX Marine Security theme. An AutoNaut USV would provide environmental monitoring

Gullick to Lead NOC's Business Development Strategy

The National Oceanography Centre (NOC) appointed Huw Gullick as Managing Director of NOC Innovations and Associate Director of Strategic Business Development starting in August 2020.NOC Innovations Ltd is the wholly owned commercial trading subsidiary of NOC, the purpose of which is to generate revenue to support the furtherance of the NOC’s charitable purposes. Huw will be a member of the NOC Executive Board, owner of our Business Development Strategy, and responsible for supporting and enabling diversifying and increasing NOC’s external income.“This is a really exciting appointment

ThayerMahan, Geo SubSea Partner for Seabed Surveys

. Together, we will provide the next generation in maritime geophysics and ocean engineering support.”Geo SubSea has extensive offshore surveying experience covering multiple marine survey and marine science fields. The Geo SubSea team has subject matter experts in marine geology, geophysics, oceanography, environmental sampling, benthic and fisheries biology. Additionally, Geo SubSea has offshore wind experience from the inception of the U.S. offshore wind industry in early 2000s and significant experience with high resolution surficial and subsurface sonar data manipulation, interpretation and

Joey Angnatok preparing ADCP and IPS mooring cages for deployment through the ice. 
 (Photo credit: James Barlett)

ASL Environmental Sciences Aids Sea Ice Study

patterns and changes in the sea ice environment to provide information to Labrador Inuit that can inform travel on the sea ice. Paul McCarney, Research Manager with the Nunatsiavut Government, coordinated the work, with additional expertise provided by Eric Oliver, an Assistant Professor of Physical Oceanography at Dalhousie University.  This work is in collaboration with Adrienne Tivy at the Canadian Ice Service and Clark Richards at Bedford Institute of Oceanography. The work relied heavily on the local knowledge expertise and efforts of Joey Angnatok, Mentor-Harvester and Field Researcher with

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