Marine Science News

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Video: Dolphins Return to Lisbon's Tagus River

shared online of a group of dolphins jumping out of the water. “It is great to see them up close, and in our very own Tagus river!”Though dolphins have been sighted in the Tagus since Roman times, the mammals are no longer seen often, according to a 2015 report by the Sea School and the Marine Science Association in Lisbon.But over the last two months, social media channels have been alive with videos and images of dolphins shared by those lucky enough to catch sight of them leaping out of the waves.“With the improvement in water quality, the river has been gaining new life and a friendly

Larger-than-average GoM ‘Dead Zone’ Expected

.This is the third year NOAA is producing its own forecast, using a suite of NOAA-supported hypoxia forecast models jointly developed by the agency and its partners – teams of researchers at the University of Michigan, Louisiana State University, William & Mary’s Virginia Institute of Marine Science, North Carolina State University, and Dalhousie University and the USGS, who provided the loading data for the models. The NOAA forecast integrates the results of these multiple models into a separate average forecast and is released in coordination with these external groups, some of which are

ThayerMahan, Geo SubSea Partner for Seabed Surveys

seabed monitoring technology into the products needed to ensure safe and efficient seabed development. Together, we will provide the next generation in maritime geophysics and ocean engineering support.”Geo SubSea has extensive offshore surveying experience covering multiple marine survey and marine science fields. The Geo SubSea team has subject matter experts in marine geology, geophysics, oceanography, environmental sampling, benthic and fisheries biology. Additionally, Geo SubSea has offshore wind experience from the inception of the U.S. offshore wind industry in early 2000s and significant

Photo: Saab Seaeye

Saab Seaeye's Falcon Flies High

flying high as the top-selling electric underwater robotic vehicle in its 34-year history.Launched nearly 20 years ago, its design has kept the pioneering concept in step with two decades of global technological advances.The Falcon has opened up many new sectors to the potential of robotics, from marine science to aquaculture and from wind energy to hydroelectric dams.The design created a small, powerful, multi-tasking, easy to use, reliable and robust vehicle - with intelligence.Just a meter-long and rated 300 to 1000 meters depth, the Falcon’s five powerful thrusters and intelligent distributed

A microfluidic sensor from Dalhousie (credit: Dartmouth Ocean Technologies Inc. and Sieben Laboratory Dalhousie University)

Environmental DNA Emerging in the Ocean Science Community

community is eager to employ this relatively new tool. In late November 2018 approximately 100 ocean scientists and stakeholders interested in marine eDNA assembled at The Rockefeller University in New York City for a conference sponsored by the Monmouth University-Rockefeller University (MURU) Marine Science and Policy Initiative. The executive summary of this gathering made it clear: “eDNA works. Get going.”But what does that mean for technologists? How does this scientific method translate into operational ocean observing? Two research labs, The Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

DSSV Pressure Drop at sea Credit NEKTON

Fleet Xpress Chosen for Nekton Project

voyage starting in mid-March exploring biodiversity around the Maldives, Seychelles and the High Seas. Video, audio and - for the first time - data will be transmitted from the deepest parts of the High Seas in the Indian Ocean to the research vessel Pressure Drop, then relayed via Fleet Xpress to marine science projects focusing on sustainable oceans. “The ocean is a key part of each Maldivian,” said President Ibrahim Mohamed Solih of Maldives. “71% rely on the ocean for their primary source of income. We have committed to a 5-year initiative to advance ocean protection and sustainably

Oi London 2020 will be a meeting point for over 500 exhibitors. Photo from Oi London 2018
 (Photo: Oceanology International )

Oi London 2020 Marks 50th Anniversary

in an increased prominence for show mainstays including the Future Tech Hub, spotlighting advanced solutions from new-to-market technologists, and the Ocean ICT Zone, which will promote connectivity and data-related innovations with a particular relevance for the Offshore Oil & Gas, Aquaculture, Marine Science and Marine Renewables sectors.The show will also provide an ideal showcase for companies looking to stage product launches and/or reveal their latest updates. Attendees can expect to encounter inspiring new developments in specialisms including ROVs, AUVs, robotics, satcoms, imaging and survey

Dr Phil Anderson and his kayak. Photo from SAMS.

@ SAMS, Science + Autonomy = Answers

Few sea and ocean-related research projects today do not involve some form of underwater robotic or marine autonomous system. Elaine Maslin reports on how they’re being used by the Scottish Association of Marine Science.Whether it’s large autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), remotely operated vehicles (ROVs), gliders, landers, small man-portable AUV systems and even air-borne vehicles, unmanned systems have become a day-to-day tool. And, while ready built systems are now readily available, easy access to components is enabling researchers to assemble bespoke platforms to meet specific

Amanda Hyam (Photo: Seiche Environmental)

Seiche Environmental Strengthens Team

and Michelle Roffe.Amanda Hyam, formerly Marine Wildlife Advisory and Ancillary Services Manager at GeoGuide Consultants Ltd, joins the business as Associate Director to enhance the team’s world-renowned operating in the oil and gas, marine construction and engineering, offshore renewables, and marine science sectors.Hyam has worked for clients including Spectrum, seismic contractors such as Polarcus, SeaBird, CGG, and large oil companies including Shell, Kosmos, Statoil and ENI.Nicky Harris is being promoted to Associate Director within the business where she has played a key role in expanding Seiche

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