Fuel Cell News

Solus-LR AUV (Photo: Cellula Robotics)

Solus-LR AUV Ready for Testing

Canada-based Cellula Robotics said its Solus-LR autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) has been constructed and is ready to begin factory integration testing.Featuring a fuel cell power pack and suction anchor, Solus-LR has a target range of 2,000 kilometers and is designed to stay submerged for multi-month missions.The long-range vehicle is being developed under a contract by Public Services and Procurement Canada, on behalf of the Department of National Defence’s (DND) science and technology organization, Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC), under the All Domain Situational Awareness

Thyssenkrupp’s MUM concept. Image from Thyssenkrupp.

Robotics: The Next Gen in Subsea Vehicles

to be used for multiple tasks. So, Thyssenkrupp set about designing a modular system, says Willem Hendrik Wehner, who supervises the project at Thyssenkrupp MS.  Thyssenkrupp’s MUM concept (Image: Thyssenkrupp)Basic modules would be trim and diving systems, battery, propulsion and a hydrogen fuel cell. Then, mission focused modules could range from ocean bottom seismic node (OBN) deployment (>1000 OBNs) to core drilling systems, or from subsea control module change out to hosting remotely operated vehicles, which would use the large UUV as a mother ship.A MUM modular kit would consist of

(Image: Cellula Robotics)

Long Range UUV to Feature Fuel Cell Power

Cellula Robotics Ltd. announced it will develop and build a long-range unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) incorporating a fuel cell power pack and suction anchor. The UUV, known as Solus-LR, will have a target range of 2,000 km and is designed to stay submerged for multi-month missions.Cellula said it is moving forward with the project after having received approval to proceed with phase 3 of a contract by Public Services and Procurement Canada, on behalf of the Department of National Defense's (DND) science and technology organization, Defense Research and Development Canada (DRDC), under the

MTR does not present an “MTR100 Creative Photo” award, but if we did this year’s winner is Houston Mechatronics. Pictured is Houston Mechatronic’s Aquanaut in wet testing earlier this year holding it’s MTR100 ‘trophy’. (Photo: Houston Mechatronics)

MTR100: The Ones to Watch

(AUVs) operate.The firm, founded in 2001, near Vancouver, Canada, initially focused on hard rock mining robotics, but then moved into the ocean space, developing seafloor mining robotics systems and then seafloor drilling systems. One of its latest projects, however, is a hovering AUV technology and fuel cells for long-range, long-endurance AUVs.It’s a natural progression for Cellula, whose founder Eric Jackson’s background is in AUV technologies. For more than 20 years, Jackson worked at International Subsea Engineering, also near Vancouver, working on submarine control systems and AUVs

(Image: thyssenkrupp)

MUM's the Word: New UUV Takes Shape in Germany

from payload transportation and operations to research missions and stationary deep-sea tasks, able to tackle jobs on the industrial and scientific fronts.   A chief limitation in subsea autonomy is addressing the issue of power, and in this regard MUM will look to incorporate an emission-free fuel cell propulsion system to allow for deep dives and long range duration.   “The world’s oceans present a wide range of tasks and questions that cannot yet be addressed because we don’t have the appropriate vehicles and systems,” said Marc Schiemann, project manager at thyssenkru

Meet MUM: Large Modifiable Underwater Mothership. Image: thyssenkrupp

MUM's the Word: New UUV Takes Shape in Germany

from payload transportation and operations to research missions and stationary deep-sea tasks, able to tackle jobs on the industrial and scientifi fronts.   A chief limitation in subsea autonomy is addressing the issue of power, and in this regard MUM will look to incorporate an emission-free fuel cell propulsion system to allow for deep dives and long range duration.   “The world’s oceans present a wide range of tasks and questions that cannot yet be addressed because we don’t have the appropriate vehicles and systems," said Marc Schiemann, project manager at thyssenkrup

Photo: Fincantieri

Italian Submarine Romeo Romei Delivered

two for Italy – the Todaro and the Scirè. These latter units, delivered by Fincantieri in 2006 and 2007 respectively, are operating as part of the Italian Navy’s fleet.    Like the other vessels in the series, the Romei is equipped with a silent propulsion system based on fuel cell technology, producing energy through an oxygen-hydrogen reaction independently from external oxygen, ensuring a considerably higher autonomy in submersion than the conventional battery-based systems. It features an electro-acoustic system which is fully integrated into the command and control system

(Photo: Fincantieri)

Submarine Pietro Venuti Delivered to Italian Navy

were delivered by Fincantieri respectively in 2006 and 2007 and are already successfully operating within the Italian Navy’s fleet.   Venuti features modern silencing techniques to reduce its acoustic signature. Furthermore, it is equipped with a silent propulsion system based on fuel cell technology, producing energy through an oxygen-hydrogen reaction, independent therefore from external oxygen, ensuring a submerged range three to four times higher than the conventional battery-based systems. It also features a fully integrated electro-acoustic and weapon-control system, as well

Mineman 3rd Class John Stephen-Torres, Commander, Task Group (CTG) 56.1, observes data from a MK 18 MOD 2 UUV for a training evolution during a mine countermeasures squadron exercise (SQUADEX) aboard the Bay-class landing dock ship Cardigan Bay (L3009) of the Royal Fleet Auxiliary. CTG 56.1 conducts mine countermeasures, explosive ordnance disposal, salvage-diving, and force protection operations throughout the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations. (U.S. Navy photo by Jonah Stepanik)

Unmanned Underwater Vehicles: Is Bigger Better?

doubling air-independent UUV energy density, using open architecture to lower cost, and enabling pier to pier autonomy in over-the-horizon operations. Achieving these goals will reduce platform vulnerability and extend the Navy’s reach into denied areas. ONR is developing a long endurance, fuel cell-based power plant to be incorporated into LDUUV prototypes. A long endurance mission demonstration is scheduled in FY 2016.”   Critical to the success of LDUUV is the energy source. “The Navy is reviewing multiple energy sources to include Silver-Zinc batteries, Lithium-Ion batteries

3.5m AutoNaut on deployment off the South Devon Coast.

Meet the AutoNaut

to provide 1 – 2 knots speed; this is also useful when maneuvering away from a slip. Photovoltaic panels trickle charge the vessel’s lead gel batteries during daylight hours, powering the command and control system and sensors. In low sunlight areas and for high power sensors, a methanol fuel cell can be added to the fully autonomous power supply to charge the batteries. AutoNaut can be controlled using local UHF or WiFi comms, or an Iridium Satellite link. Waypoints, tracks and missions can be sent to the vessel by the pilot at any time and easily amended dependent on weather conditions

Marine Technology Magazine Cover Sep 2019 - Autonomous Vehicle Operations

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