Arctic Ocean News

Dr. Matthew Asplin (Photo: ASL Enviromental Sciences)

ASL Hires Dr. Asplin

the University of Manitoba under Dr. David Barber investigating how Arctic storms influence dynamic and thermodynamic processes in Arctic sea ice and across the ocean-sea ice atmosphere interface, and how these processes might change with climate change.  This project details an emerging ice-free Arctic ocean over the past decade that reveals a surface that absorbs and retains more solar radiation and thus is apt to be characterized by a delayed winter freeze-up, increased autumn storminess, and higher frequencies of large waves and swells.  Waves can propagate into the pack ice, causing flexural

U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Lauren Steenson

#Oi2020: Subsea History

with the vessel that year he and his team discovered a 10,000-foot high seamount approximately 400 miles north of Barrow, Alaska, which they named the Healy Seamount.Thirteen years later, On September 23, 2016, (see photo) the Healy’s crewmembers prepared to deploy a dredging project in the Arctic Ocean. The mission was for the purpose of collecting rock samples from outcrops of a seafloor canyon. The project was unique in that today’s modern expeditions (such as this one) can now include sovereign rights to resources in icy areas that more than 10 years ago were inaccessible.Marine Technology

Image: ABB

Remote-Controlled Submersible Fish Farm in Arctic Ocean

Digital technology leader ABB has won a contract from Arctic Offshore Farming to power its first-ever remote controlled submersible offshore salmon farm in the Arctic Ocean.ABB will provide a comprehensive package of its leading electrical, automation, instrumentation and telecom technologies that ensure maximum efficiency and minimal environmental impact.With the global market volume of salmon expected to hit 4.5 million tons by 2023, according to a 2018 report by Research and Markets, the Arctic Offshore Farming project is looking for ways to farm fish in a more sustainable manner.The submerged fish

Near the Bear Island, in the Svalbard archipelago, the INBIS channel kept its unique submarine relief during the Last Glacial Maximum (image: José Luis Casamor (GRC Marine Geosciences /University of Barcelona)

Researchers Study Unique Arctic Channel

A scientific study describes for the first time the submarine cartography of a high-latitude system in a channel covers tens of kilometers in the northern western area of the Barents Sea, in the Arctic Ocean. The Interfan Bear Island and Storfjorden (IBIS) channel is one of the few submarine valleys in polar latitudes that kept its geological architecture during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), according to the new study published in the journal Arktos – The Journal of Arctic Geosciences.Terra incognita: discovering the planet’s sea floorsMany unknown landscapes in our planet are under

The Kongsberg Maritime EM 124 1x2" mapped the Puerto Rico Trench to depths greater than 8,000 meters. (Photo: Kongsberg Maritime)

Sonar Assists Deepest Solo Sub Dive

at least 72,000 meters of water.After the 8,648 meter dive to the bottom of the Puerto Rico Trench, the mission will head to the South Sandwich Trench (Southern Ocean 8,428 meters), Java Trench (Indian Ocean 7,725 meters), Mariana Trench/Challenger Deep (Pacific Ocean 10,898 meters) and Malloy Deep (Arctic Ocean 5,669 meters).Hancock said Kongsberg will remain involved with the mission throughout. "Over the next 12 months, we will continue to work together and support the expedition remotely through our Mapping Cloud service," he said

© Graphithèque/AdobeStock

NATO Uses IoT to Study the Oceans

the seas of the Arctic will see buoys deployed in the Barents Sea, and further into Arctic waters, in Summer 2019.“The maritime areas in the High North are the new frontier for oceanographic study and more research is crucial. In particular, with polar ice decreasing, we need to understand how Arctic ocean life will be impacted,” said Dr Pierre-Marie Poulain, Principal Scientist and Project Leader at CMRE. Furthermore, Arctic research becomes fundamental to guarantee safe and secure maritime traffic in the new routes around the North Pole. Thousands of SPOT Trace units are used for oceanograph

Small remnants of thicker, multiyear ice float with thinner, seasonal ice in the Beaufort Sea on Sept. 30, 2016. Credit: NASA/GSFC/Alek Petty

Arctic Sea Ice is Youngest and Thinnest Now

The Arctic Ocean's blanket of sea ice has changed since 1958 from predominantly older, thicker ice to mostly younger, thinner ice, according to new research published by NASA scientist Ron Kwok of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California.With so little thick, old ice left, the rate of decrease in ice thickness has slowed. New ice grows faster but is more vulnerable to weather and wind, so ice thickness is now more variable, rather than dominated by the effect of global warming, according to NASA's Earth Science News Team.Working from a combination of satellite records and declassified

3D visualisation of the Canary Islands (Image: EMODnet)

New EMODnet Bathymetry Data Product

= circa 12.3 billion data points;A powerful 3D visualization functionality of the bathymetry that can be used in the browser without the requirement of plugins;A faster representation of the complexity of the map;An expanded coverage including all European seas as well as the European part of the Arctic Ocean and Barents Sea;The number of bathymetric survey data sets and composite DTMs, used as data sources, has increased from about 7,200 to about 9,400. These come from 48 data providers. All related metadata can be retrieved through a source reference layer;The inclusion of Satellite Derived Bathymetry

In an area that extends above 80 degrees latitude, Fugro is collecting high res seabed data for Norwegian authorities mapping programme, MAREANO. (Photo: Fugro)

Fugro Resumes Norwegian Seabed Mapping Project

completed numerous surveys for the program since 2006, collecting more than 100,000 square kilometers of data.In water depths that typically range from 80 meters to 1,700 meters, the survey area of approximately 14,500 square kilometers is located between the Norwegian Sea, the Barents Sea and the Arctic Ocean. Fugro’s equipment on the survey vessels, including MV Victor Hensen and MV Fugro Gauss, will collect high resolution, high density multibeam echo sounder data, together with sub-bottom and gravity meter data, to gather marine knowledge for the Norwegian mapping program. The fieldwork is

(Source: NOAA Climate.gov, Data: Mark Tschudi)

Old Sea Ice is Disappearing from the Arctic Ocean

Sea ice grows throughout the fall and winter, and melts throughout the spring and summer. But not all Arctic sea ice melts; some portion of the ice survives at least one melt season, persisting throughout the summer months. This ice is usually thicker and more resistant to melt than ice that's less than a year old, and therefore more likely than first-year ice to survive the coming melt season. As Arctic sea ice often reaches its maximum extent around late February or early March (around the ninth week of the calendar year) that's a good time to measure multiyear versus first-year ice.In the

Marine Technology Magazine Cover Oct 2019 - Ocean Observation: Gliders, Buoys & Sub-Surface Networks

Marine Technology Reporter is the world's largest audited subsea industry publication serving the offshore energy, subsea defense and scientific communities.

Subscribe
Marine Technology ENews subscription

Marine Technology ENews is the subsea industry's largest circulation and most authoritative ENews Service, delivered to your Email three times per week

Subscribe for MTR E-news