National Science Foundation News

Shea Quinn (Photo: Teledyne Marine)

Teledyne Webb Research Hires Quinn, Goodrich

ocean instrumentation: neutrally buoyant, autonomous drifters and profilers (10,000 to date), autonomous underwater gliding vehicles (900 to date) and moored underwater sound sources. These systems are core to several major ocean monitoring programs including the international Argo array, the National Science Foundation Ocean Observatories Initiative and the U.S. Navy Littoral Battlespace Sensing – Glider (LBS-G) program of record. A Teledyne Webb Research Slocum glider, the Scarlet Knight, was the first unmanned vehicle to cross an ocean

Nina Mahmoudian (center) and her students have developed an underwater glider that can operate silently and in confined spaces, ideal for conducting biology or climate studies without disturbing wildlife. (Purdue University photo/Jared Pike)

Team at Purdue Advances Work on New Glider, ROUGHIE

algorithms in parallel,” Mahmoudian said. “For the price of a current commercial vehicle, we can put 10 of these in the water, monitoring conditions for months at a time. We believe this vehicle has great value to any local community.”This work is supported by the National Science Foundation (grant 1921060), Office of Naval Research (grant N00014-20-1-2085) and the Naval Sea Systems Command Small Business Technology Transfer program N68335-19-C-0086. Video Credit: Jared Pik

The R/V Roger Revelle pictured at sea for a 10-day commissioning and calibration cruise following its midlife refit. Photo Copyright: Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Ship Repair: Inside the $60m Refit of RV Roger Revelle

ship operations at Scripps Oceanography. “The midlife refit was an opportunity to apply everything we’ve learned about the ship since 1996, in order to make a great research vessel even more effective.”The $60 million refit was supported by the Office of Naval Research (ONR), National Science Foundation (NSF), and UC San Diego, and highlights included:Repower: The repowering involved replacing the six existing air-cooled generators and split electrical bus configuration (auxiliary and propulsion separate) with four new water-cooled generators and an integrated bus (auxiliary and propulsion

Photo: OSIL

OSIL, URI Collaborate on Research Project

University of Rhode Island (URI) had a recent requirement for two oceanographic buoy systems and land-based deck unit for ongoing oceanographic research under the Rhode Island Consortium for Coastal Ecology Assessment Innovation & Modeling (RI-CAIM), a five-year grant program funded by the National Science Foundation (Award #OIA-1655221). Researchers have requested systems that can use a new array of sensors and equipment, called the integrated Bay Observatory, that has already been acquired by URI through RI C-AIM.  The data from this platform will be sent back to a computer system hosted

The white microbial mats seen here are telltale signs of areas where methane may be released from underground methane deposits. Photo courtesy Andrew Thurber Oregon State University.

Scientists Discover First Methane Seep in Antarctic Sea Floor

;t respond in a matter of days or an hour or a month, but on the time scale of years," Thurber said. "As years start to add up, that becomes something that may potentially impact our ability to predict our future planet."Karla Heidelberg, a microbial ecologist with the U.S.-based National Science Foundation, said more methane seeps could be revealed as climate change causes oceans to warm and Antarctic ice sheets melt."As the ice coverage changes, it could expose more of these seeps to become potential inputs to atmospheric carbon," Heidelberg said.Antarctica's frozen stores

Antarctic krill are shrimplike, pinkie-length crustaceans. They form the base of the Antarctic food chain, and are an essential part of the ecosystem. (Photo: NOAA AERD)

New Acoustic Technology Helps Conserve the Antarctic Ecosystem

technology.Adult Gentoo penguins in the Antarctic typically spend the entire day hunting, and their diet includes fish, squid and krill. (Photo: NOAA AERD)Using novel ADCP technology for improved data collectionWith the help of two other CCAMLR nations (Norway and the UK) and the U.S. National Science Foundation, a suite of moorings equipped with Signature100 ADCPs and gliders was deployed in the Antarctic Peninsula’s waters last year.“Multiple simple moorings like the ones we have designed for this program generate near-complete time series of biological conditions in the vicinity

A new MIT-developed search-and-rescue algorithm identifies hidden “traps” in ocean waters. The method may help quickly identify regions where objects — and missing people — may have converged. Image courtesy of the researchers/http://news.mit.edu/

Tech Talk: Algorithm Aims to Assist Ocean Search and Rescue

. So if there’s an accident in the last hour, they can immediately look and see where the sea traps are. That’s important for when there’s a limited time window in which they have to respond, in hopes of a successful outcome.”This research was primarily funded by the National Science Foundation’s Hazards SEES program, with additional support from the Office of Naval Research and the German National Science Foundation

A Purdue team is transforming shrimp shell material into a functional device for generating electricity. (Image: Purdue University)

Device Turns Shells of Sea Creatures Into Power

Office of Technology Commercialization to patent the technology. The office recently moved into the Convergence Center for Innovation and Collaboration in Discovery Park District, adjacent to the Purdue campus.The creators are looking for partners to commercialize their technology.  The National Science Foundation provided support for part of the research. The Purdue team’s work was presented in Advanced Materials

NUI is lowered into the Aegean Sea before plunging to a depth of 500 meters to explore Kolumbo volcano. (Photo by Evan Lubofsky, © Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

WHOI Robot Takes First Known Automated Sample from Ocean

robots where there’s a shared intelligence spanning an entire fleet, with each vehicle working cooperatively like bees in a hive,” Camilli says. “It will go well beyond losing the joystick.”Funding for this project was provided by a NASA PSTAR Grant #NNX16AL08 and a National Science Foundation National Robotics Initiative grant #IIS-1830500.(Source: WHOI

Marine Technology Magazine Cover Jan 2021 - Underwater Vehicle Annual

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