3D Printing News

The AutoNaut Caravela wave propelled unmanned surface vessel with its SeaGlider payload. Photo: AutoNaut

Unmanned Marine Systems, Squared

conditions, so needed changing, says Nichol. Instead of more traditional biofouling paints, which leach copper, the project is looking at a type of vinyl, creating a Teflon-like surface.Increasingly AutoNaut’s USVs, including a sensor payload in a fin unit, have been made easier by the use of 3D printing, says Nichol, which not only makes producing parts (mostly with a nylon resin) easier (e.g. moulds don’t have to be made to create some parts and the amount of complex machining is reduced), but also allows for more flexible design, i.e. it’s not constrained by manufacturing methods

Image 2: This triple-image of a cutting tool shows stages of design optimization from original CAD model, to topology optimized result, to the final additively-manufacturable part. Designed in nTop Platform by nTopology partner Yamaichi Special Steel.

The Case for 3D Printing Downhole Tools

Advanced design software supports growth of additive manufacturing applications in the oil and gas industryAdditive manufacturing (AM, aka 3D printing) is beginning to impact product-development strategies in the oil and gas industry just as it already has in many other industries—by shifting the production paradigm in unexpected ways.Particularly in the case of downhole tools, overall tool size is compatible with the range of part dimensions that today’s AM systems are capable of manufacturing. Consider a common piece of equipment on any oil and gas rig: the tricone drill bit. Required to

TMS to Use 3D Printers for Submarines

thyssenkrupp TechCenter Additive Manufacturing (in Mülheim an der Ruhr, North Rhein-Westphalia), the required technology and expertise will now come to the Kiel Fjord. It is planned to complete the transition by June 2020.Dr. Luis Alejandro Orellano, COO of thyssenkrupp Marine Systems said: "3D printing opens up completely new potentials for us. In the design engineering, we no longer have to consider the limits of conventional manufacturing processes everywhere. In this way, we give our customers more freedom in the design of the boats."Orellano added: "At the same time, we can produce

World First: Patrol Vessels Deploy 3D Printers

3D printing technology developed in Darwin will be deployed by the Royal Australian Navy in a world-first trial that will streamline the maintenance of patrol vessels.The Morrison Government will invest $1.5 million in the two-year Supersonic Deposition 3D printer pilot, which will lead to a significant increase of parts availability compared to what the regular supply chain can provide.Minister for Defense Industry, the Hon Melissa Price MP, congratulated the Charles Darwin University’s Advanced Manufacturing Alliance, along with industry partner SPEE3D, for producing the cutting edge and

Thyssenkrupp Wins 3D Printing Approval

The international accredited registrar and classification society DNV GL has awarded thyssenkrupp, German multinational conglomerate, first additive manufacturing  approval of manufacturer certificateThe shipping industry is looking to take advantage of additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D printing, to print spare parts, thereby reducing lead times, costs, stock requirements, and environmental impacts. Certification ensures that AM part users can have the same confidence in an additive manufactured product as a conventionally produced one.The newly issued certificate makes the thyssenkrupp

Researchers converted their three-finger soft manipulator to a two-finger version, seen here performing a pinch grasp on an extremely delicate sea cucumber. (Credit: Schmidt Ocean Institute)

A Soft Solution to a Hard Underwater Problem

the status quo and never challenged,” said Wyss Institute Founding Director Donald Ingber, M.D., Ph.D., who is also the Judah Folkman Professor of Vascular Biology at HMS and the Vascular Biology Program at Boston Children’s Hospital, as well as Professor of Bioengineering at SEAS. “3D printing and soft robotics technologies are now allowing the processes of design and iteration to happen on-site rather than in the lab, making it faster, easier, and cheaper to create solutions to existing problems.”Additional authors of the paper include Kaitlyn Becker and Mortiz Graule from the

Figure 1: The Riptide Family of Compact UUVs (Photo: Riptide)

Taking UUVs Faster, Further & Deeper

(shown in Figure 3, on page 44), the initial design was determined to well exceed the threshold depth rating, which was then increased to 300 meters for the standard vehicle while maintaining an adequate factor of safety.Riptide utilized the latest methods of rapid manufacturing heavily relying on 3D printing or additive manufacturing in its early production deliveries. Riptide has recently procured injection resin molds for all 3D printed parts for the micro-UUV under a manufacturing grant from Massachusetts, but maintain the ability to 3D print any component for design flexibility. Under a DARPA

The William B Morgan Large Cavitation Channel (LCC) is a large variable-pressure closed-loop water tunnel that has been operated by the U.S. Navy in Memphis since 1991. This facility is well designed for a wide variety of hydrodynamic and hydroacoustic tests. Its overall size and capabilities allow test-model Reynolds numbers to approach, or even achieve, those of full-scale air- or water-borne transportation systems. (Photo: U.S. Navy)

Navy Tests Scale Models in Big Facilities

test parameters,” said Foster.The test objects are suspended in a 10 x 10 by 43 ft. long chamber. The chamber can be drained and opened to gain access to the test object, which can be changed to test difference shapes and configurations. “We can create different control surfaces through 3D printing,” said Brown.Right now the LCC is being used to characterize the performance of the propulsor for the Columbia-class ballistic missile submarine, the replacement for the Ohio-class submarines. “We built a scale model of the entire submarine and propulsor to measure everything from

CFIS

Shell Ocean Discovery XPrize Field Pared to 9

test.   Big Prize, Big Picture “We are looking to pull in exponential technology shifts into the marine realm,” said Dr. Virmani. “There are huge shifts in technology that we’re seeing in other areas that we want to bring into the marine realm,” such as the use of 3D printing to effectively cut costs, and the use of drone technology to make operations more cost effective.   “I am very excited at what is coming out of this so far, and I think you will see some technologies emerge that truly revolutionize the way in which we access the deep sea and map the

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