Arctic News

Dr. Catherine Warner, Director, NATO CMRE. Photo: CMRE

Interview: Dr. Catherine Warner, Director, NATO CMRE

have that capability. When we go out on Alliance with whatever mission packages or trials we’re going to do, we will have several different nations participating. Alliance is a global class research vessel and is ice hardened for operating in extreme latitudes.  We’ve been going to the Arctic pretty much every year. This summer when we were up there we had collaborators from seven different countries and different research institutions. One just had one glider that they wanted to test a new sensor on. Someone else had a whole series of experiments where they wanted to collect solution

Philip Adams, Director UMass Dartmouth’s Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship. Photo: UMass Dartmouth.

Pioneering Ocean Energy Innovation in New England: Wind and Water

, Phil Adams, a forward-thinking energy entrepreneur welcomed participants and remarked, “to me, it’s pretty clear that our voracious appetite for energy has created the greenhouse gas effect.  We reached 415 ppm of carbon a week or two ago, and on that day, it was 86 degrees in the Arctic”. He pointed out several solutions to recent environment crises that are moving markets and society to action, including: credit trading to stem the acid rain problem; banning fluorocarbons to close the ozone hole and the public awareness campaign in Cape Town S. Africa around their plight

The RRS Sir David Attenborough, Britain’s new polar research vessel: the naming ceremony for the ship will be held at shipbuilder Cammell Laird’s yard in Birkenhead, England on September 26.

(Photo: British Antarctic Survey)

Polar RV Sir David Attenborough Naming Ceremony

Thursday, 26 September, the ceremonial naming of the new British polar research ship RRS Sir David Attenborough will take place at the Cammell Laird Birkenhead shipyard.The ship was commissioned by the UK’s Natural Environment Research Council, built by Cammell Laird, and operated by the British Antarctic Survey. This vessel is designed to transform how ship-borne science is conducted in the Polar Regions and its commissioning is part of a major UK Government polar infrastructure investment program aiming to keep Britain at the forefront of world-leading research in Antarctica and the Arctic. The

Norwegian Coast Guard vessel KV Svalbard and its crew at the North Pole: the ship is the first ABB Azipod powered craft to reach the Pole. (Photo: ABB)

ABB Propulsion Takes Ship to North Pole

is the first vessel powered by an ABB Azipod propulsion system to reach the North Pole.The ship is equipped with twin 5MW Azipod icebreaking units which enabled it to sail through polar ice at speeds of up to 6 to 7 knots when it took part in an international scientific expedition, the Coordinated Arctic Acoustic Thermometry Experiment led by Norwegian research foundation The Nansen Center.The Azipod electric propulsion system is designed to make s ships highly maneuverable, being based on an electric drive motor located under the ship’s hull in a submerged pod that can be fully rotated to

The ‘Stodig’ (Norwegian for ‘steady’) was designed by British architects Guylee Simmonds and David Schnabel as a comfortable excursion vessel for Arctic journeys. The solar-powered vessel is able to right itself when capsized and has been dubbed ‘the unsinkable solar lifeboat’.

(Photo courtesy of Asylum PR)

Lifeboat Converted Into Unsinkable Solar-Powered Arctic Excursion Boat

, your concerns include a bit more of the finer things in life,” they stated.The ideas that the architect applied throughout the project were informed by their experience in designing buildings, their objective being to capture the views and bring the outside in while at the same time keeping the Arctic conditions out. One of the main conversions to the boat, which is named Stodig, was to cut into its back to create a deck. They also made a wood burner the focal point of the interior space to give plenty of heat and they built a seating area that faced a friendly-sized kitchen. They then added a

(File photo: TechnipFMC)

TechnipFMC to Split into Two Companies

to include biofuels and alternative energy projects.That company will have about 15,000 employees.TechnipFMC received a record volume of orders in the second quarter, supported by new liquefied natural gas (LNG) projects. The company recently won a $7.6 billion contract from Russia's Novatek for the Arctic LNG-2 project in western Siberia.MacGregor told investors that additional LNG projects were likely meet global demand for the fuel through 2035 and 2040.(Reporting by Arathy S Nair and Liz Hampton; Additional reporting by Gwenaelle Barzic; Editing by Maju Samuel and Richard Chang

© Alexander/Adobe Stock

July: Earth's Hottest Month Ever Recorded

Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), July 2019 was hottest month on record for the planet and Polar sea ice melted to record lows.Much of the planet sweltered in unprecedented heat in July, as temperatures soared to new heights in the hottest month ever recorded. The record warmth also shrank Arctic and Antarctic sea ice to historic lows.The average global temperature in July was 1.71 degrees F above the 20th-century average of 60.4 degrees, making it the hottest July in the 140-year record, according to scientists at NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information. The previous

Photo: David Vargas/Lindblad Expeditions

MTR100: #3 Sven Lindblad, Lindblad Expeditions

#3 in the 14th Annual "MTR100". The full  electronic edition of Marine Technology Reporter is available at https://magazines.marinelink.com/nwm/MarineTechnology/201907/.Intrepid explorer and wildlife photographer Sven Lindblad blazed the trail for environmentally sensitive travelers to Antarctica on Lindblad Expedition’s fleet of cruise ships with National Geographic.You can tell a lot about a man by whom his heroes are, whether famous athletes, virtuoso musicians, brave warriors or movie stars. As we age, we choose our heroes by their moral compass, seeking wisdom, inspiration and

Swedish icebreaker Oden (Photo: University of Rhode Island)

Scientists Find Micro Plastic in Arctic Ice

Tiny pieces of plastic have been found in ice cores drilled in the Arctic by a U.S.-led team of scientists, underscoring the threat the growing form of pollution poses to marine life in even the remotest waters on the planet.The researchers used a helicopter to land on ice floes and retrieve the samples during an 18-day icebreaker expedition through the Northwest Passage, the hazardous route linking the Pacific and Atlantic oceans."We had spent weeks looking out at what looks so much like pristine white sea ice floating out on the ocean," said Jacob Strock, a graduate student researcher at

PhD student James Coogan will be deploying the ecoSUB on its mission into a hostile Arctic environment (Photo: SAMS)

Robotic AUV Takes on ‘Dangerous’ Arctic Mission

An underwater robotic vehicle will go on an Arctic research mission deemed too dangerous for humans in a bid to help scientists understand the true extent of melting from Arctic glaciers.A team from the Scottish Association for Marine Science (SAMS) in Oban, led by oceanographer Prof Mark Inall, will deploy a small autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) known as an ecoSUB to the foot of a melting glacier in Arctic Norway. The aim is to learn more about the effect of meltwater on a process called ‘calving’, which causes huge chunks of ice to break off the glacier edge.Less than a meter in

Marine Technology Magazine Cover Sep 2019 - Autonomous Vehicle Operations

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