Arctic News

© Alexander/Adobe Stock

July: Earth's Hottest Month Ever Recorded

Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), July 2019 was hottest month on record for the planet and Polar sea ice melted to record lows.Much of the planet sweltered in unprecedented heat in July, as temperatures soared to new heights in the hottest month ever recorded. The record warmth also shrank Arctic and Antarctic sea ice to historic lows.The average global temperature in July was 1.71 degrees F above the 20th-century average of 60.4 degrees, making it the hottest July in the 140-year record, according to scientists at NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information. The previous

Photo: David Vargas/Lindblad Expeditions

MTR100: #3 Sven Lindblad, Lindblad Expeditions

#3 in the 14th Annual "MTR100". The full  electronic edition of Marine Technology Reporter is available at https://magazines.marinelink.com/nwm/MarineTechnology/201907/.Intrepid explorer and wildlife photographer Sven Lindblad blazed the trail for environmentally sensitive travelers to Antarctica on Lindblad Expedition’s fleet of cruise ships with National Geographic.You can tell a lot about a man by whom his heroes are, whether famous athletes, virtuoso musicians, brave warriors or movie stars. As we age, we choose our heroes by their moral compass, seeking wisdom, inspiration and

Swedish icebreaker Oden (Photo: University of Rhode Island)

Scientists Find Micro Plastic in Arctic Ice

Tiny pieces of plastic have been found in ice cores drilled in the Arctic by a U.S.-led team of scientists, underscoring the threat the growing form of pollution poses to marine life in even the remotest waters on the planet.The researchers used a helicopter to land on ice floes and retrieve the samples during an 18-day icebreaker expedition through the Northwest Passage, the hazardous route linking the Pacific and Atlantic oceans."We had spent weeks looking out at what looks so much like pristine white sea ice floating out on the ocean," said Jacob Strock, a graduate student researcher at

PhD student James Coogan will be deploying the ecoSUB on its mission into a hostile Arctic environment (Photo: SAMS)

Robotic AUV Takes on ‘Dangerous’ Arctic Mission

An underwater robotic vehicle will go on an Arctic research mission deemed too dangerous for humans in a bid to help scientists understand the true extent of melting from Arctic glaciers.A team from the Scottish Association for Marine Science (SAMS) in Oban, led by oceanographer Prof Mark Inall, will deploy a small autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) known as an ecoSUB to the foot of a melting glacier in Arctic Norway. The aim is to learn more about the effect of meltwater on a process called ‘calving’, which causes huge chunks of ice to break off the glacier edge.Less than a meter in

Dr. Matthew Asplin (Photo: ASL Enviromental Sciences)

ASL Hires Dr. Asplin

ASL Environmental Sciences appointed Dr. Matthew Asplin to the position of Metocean and Arctic Project Manager. Dr. Asplin brings a diverse set of multidisciplinary research skills in meteorology, sea ice, and oceanography, and has over 15 years of experience in these fields.  He will be responsible for project management and client liaison tasks for projects across these disciplines, and will also be active in responding to business development opportunities and academic collaborations, as well as expanding new consulting services to ASL's present clients. Dr. Asplin will also be active

(Photo: TechnipFMC)

TechnipFMC: Record Orders, Backlog in Q2

and the total backlog for projects for the company increased more than 75 percent since year-end to $25.8 billion.Pferdehirt said TechnipFMC was benefiting from the new wave of liquefied natural gas (LNG) projects. The company on Tuesday won a $7.6 billion contract from Russia's Novatek for the Arctic LNG-2 project in western Siberia."The LNG market growth continues to be underpinned by the structural shift towards natural gas as an energy transition fuel, helping to meet the increasing demand for energy while lowering greenhouse gases," Pferdehirt said.TechnipFMC said its subsea division

U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Lauren Steenson

#Oi2020: Subsea History

outing with the vessel that year he and his team discovered a 10,000-foot high seamount approximately 400 miles north of Barrow, Alaska, which they named the Healy Seamount.Thirteen years later, On September 23, 2016, (see photo) the Healy’s crewmembers prepared to deploy a dredging project in the Arctic Ocean. The mission was for the purpose of collecting rock samples from outcrops of a seafloor canyon. The project was unique in that today’s modern expeditions (such as this one) can now include sovereign rights to resources in icy areas that more than 10 years ago were inaccessible.Marine

Photo: Damen

Damen Completes Complex DSV Job

Damen Shiprepair Amsterdam has finished repair work on the 156m Diving Support Vessel (DSV) Deep Arctic. The shipyard reports that it was a complex project with a total of 2198 work permits issued, an indication of the large number of individual jobs that were completed and the number of stakeholders involved. The TechnipFMC-owned Deep Arctic came to Damen Shiprepair Amsterdam (DSAm) primarily for a main class renewal (intermediate) docking and for maintenance including the renewal of the steel plates to its box coolers. To achieve this the yard removed 31 separate box coolers from the

Weddell Sea polynya, initally 3,700 square miles, 2017. False color NASA satellite image shows ice in blue, clouds in white. (Photo: Scripps Institution of Oceanography)

Robotic Data Help Explain Mysterious Holes

The winter ice on the surface of Antarctica's Weddell Sea occasionally develops an enormous hole. In 2016 and 2017, one such hole drew intense curiosity from scientists and the media.Though bigger gaps had formed decades before, this was the first time oceanographers had a chance to truly monitor the unexpected gap in Antarctic winter sea ice. It was an opportunity that came about as a result of uncanny timing and a seasoned oceanographer’s knowledge of the sea.A new study co-authored by researchers from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego combines

Image: ABB

Remote-Controlled Submersible Fish Farm in Arctic Ocean

Digital technology leader ABB has won a contract from Arctic Offshore Farming to power its first-ever remote controlled submersible offshore salmon farm in the Arctic Ocean.ABB will provide a comprehensive package of its leading electrical, automation, instrumentation and telecom technologies that ensure maximum efficiency and minimal environmental impact.With the global market volume of salmon expected to hit 4.5 million tons by 2023, according to a 2018 report by Research and Markets, the Arctic Offshore Farming project is looking for ways to farm fish in a more sustainable manner.The submerged fish

Marine Technology Magazine Cover Jul 2019 - MTR White Papers: Hydrographic

Marine Technology Reporter is the world's largest audited subsea industry publication serving the offshore energy, subsea defense and scientific communities.

Subscribe
Marine Technology ENews subscription

Marine Technology ENews is the subsea industry's largest circulation and most authoritative ENews Service, delivered to your Email three times per week

Subscribe for MTR E-news