Chemical Sensors News

The bespoke drill rig being lowered over the side of the RRS James Cook. The rig is designed to push the curved steel pipe into the seabed sediment. Image: Copyright STEMM-CCS Project

Increased Confidence in CO2 Storage

as CO2 bubbles began to emerge from beneath the sediment. The idea was then to test how well an array of sensors, developed and built for the experiment, might perform.Acoustic and optical instruments were deployed to detect the sound made by streams of bubbles or  spot them with cameras, while chemical sensors ‘sniffed out’  the CO2 and the minute amounts of inert chemical tracers it contained, so allowing the scientists to  differentiate this signal from any naturally occurring CO2. ROVs and autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) bearing other sensors completed the arsenal of

Resourceful: Norwegian AUV and oceanographic researchers work in sync. Photo Credit: Professor Martin Ludvigsen, NTNU AMOS

The “Disruption” in AUV Trends

hooks and navigational aids to spectral cameras and satellite- or drone launch equipment. For OEMs in general, however, changing payloads — or combinations of multibeam echosounders, side-scan sonars, sub-bottom profilers, synthetic aperture sonars, high-definition cameras, laser systems, and chemical sensors — imply uncertainty in production. Some companies, like France’s ECE, appear to have an AUV for every mission: an imaging A18-E; the maneuverable, twin-hull A18-TD for “homeland” surveillance; a man-portable A9-s and about a dozen others. Like its competitors, perhaps

An artist’s depiction of LRAUV under sea ice. Using photo-chemical sensors, the robot scans the density of a billowing cloud of oil coming from an ocean floor well. The red and yellow objects are parts of a communication system consisting of antennas suspended under ice from a buoy installed on top of the ice.  Graphic by ADAC.

LRAUV: Arctic Oil-Spill-Mapping Robot Put to the Test

of its LRAUV prototype in Monterey Bay, California, with the goal to characterize an oil spill and transmit data back to shore.“The researchers showed us how LRAUV works; this was the first test with the oil sensors and data transmission in action,” said Trego.LRAUV was equipped with chemical sensors and simulated an oil spill from a vessel by “leaking” a non-toxic, neon green sea dye into the water. The dye, just like oil, can float in the top 13 feet of the water column, but biodegrades in sunlight in a matter of hours.“This specific water test was intended to check all

(Image: ISE)

ISE Sells 6000m-rated AUV to China

m depth.The modular design of the ISE Explorer enables it to carry multiple payloads in its spacious, swappable, and customizable payload section including Multibeam Echosounders, Sidescan Sonars, Sub-bottom Profilers, Synthetic Aperture Sonars, High Definition Cameras and Laser Systems, CTDs and chemical sensors, or any combination of AUV payloads. Additional battery sections can be added to extend the endurance from 24 hours up to 72 hours.The ISE Explorer AUV has a proven track record of offshore operational success with customers from Asia, Europe, Australia, the U.S. and Canada.The vehicle&rsquo

Ed Hill (Photo: NOC)

Voices: NOC Executive Director Ed Hill

, and we’ve done some great science with it. Many of those science and advances now have practical applications in much more mundane but very useful applications.   For example, we discovered the world’s deepest, hottest, hydrothermal vents by sniffing out their plumes with chemical sensors on an autonomous vehicle. The same technology has got applications for sniffing out precursor chemicals from carbon-capturing storage sites subsea. Some of the technologies that we used for exploring underneath Antarctic ice shelves – where you are completely remote from the ship and you

(Photo: Schmidt Ocean Institute)

Uncharted Depths: Exploring the Marianas with SuBastian

of Washington, led a 27-day mission to the Back-arc with researchers from the University of Washington, Oregon State University and NOAA-PMEL. A vital member of the team was the autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), Sentry.   The Sentry AUV carried instrument packages consisting of optical and chemical sensors and surveyed systematically for hydrothermally active areas. Three new hydrothermal vent sites were discovered, one being the third deepest in the world.    “At the end of the first expedition, we knew there were vent sites on the seafloor, but we had little or no information

Paul Bunje (Photo courtesy of XPRIZE)

Teams Vie for $2m Ocean Health XPRIZE

, Calif.), a team of teenagers and young adults with expertise in designing and manufacturing pH instruments used off the coast of Australia at the Great Barrier Reef. •Sunburst Sensors (Missoula, Mont.), a team led by the founders of Sunburst Sensor, a company focused on the development of chemical sensors for marine and freshwater applications. •Team Durafet (Plymouth, Minn.), a team comprised of representatives from Sea-Bird Scientific, the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and Honeywell Aerospace&rsquo

MUNIN AUV

Kongsberg Makes Multiple Debuts in London at Oceanology 2014

and gas leakages from subsea installations, pipelines and risers. The MSM is built on a foundation of field proven technology including Kongsberg cNODE for underwater acoustic positioning and data link, a range of Kongsberg hydroacoustic sensors and third party sensors, in addition to sophisticated chemical sensors and hydrocarbon sniffers from Kongsberg Maritime partner Contros Systems & Solutions GmbH. Advanced data processing and power management strategies ensure MSM’s ability to deliver critical sensor data continuously, for long duration missions. The modularity and scalability of the MSM

The Modular Subsea Monitoring-Network (MSM) is a flexible solution deployable on projects of all types and scale.

Kongsberg’s New Approach to Subsea Monitoring

;ren Themann, Managing Director Kongsberg Maritime Embient GmbH. The MSM is built on a foundation of field proven technology including KONGSBERG cNODE for underwater acoustic positioning and data link, a range of KONGSBERG hydroacoustic sensors and 3rd party sensors, in addition to sophisticated chemical sensors and hydrocarbon sniffers from Kongsberg Maritime partner CONTROS Systems & Solutions GmbH. Advanced data processing and power management strategies ensure MSM’s ability to deliver critical sensor data continuously, for long duration missions. The modularity and scalability of the MSM

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