Communications News

Saab Seaeye’s Sabertooth AUV (Photo from Saab Seaeye)

Seaspace Race Underway at Saab Subsea Docking Demo

use of drones, we need to change the way we work and the way we think. If you have made that investment, the work it does is then free.”Ioseba Tena, global business manager for robotics at Sonardyne, also presented at the event. He said that a combination of acoustics, for multi-kilometer communications and ranging to base stations, and optical communications, for high bandwidth live video and control, would give operators full control and flexibility over their vehicles. “BlueComm gives you docking with wireless control.A key focus for Equinor is making the SDS and open standard. Eide

Saab Seaeye’s Sabretooth it in its test tank (Photo: Saab Seaeye)

Saab Seaeye eRobotics Campaign Wins UTC Award

and vertical plane. And it is the only vehicle currently on the market capable of undertaking long-term residency in difficult to access locations.”Separately, Saab Seaeye is working with Ocean Power Technologies (OPT) to jointly develop and market solutions for AUV and ROV charging and communications systems, using a buoy-based wave energy generator for power and communications. Its Sabertooth is also being used by Eni, which is trialing a wave power buoy to demonstrate the ability to charge subsea vehicles. Later this year, a Sabertooth, adapted by Modus Seabed Intervention, based in England

Thyssenkrupp’s MUM concept. Image from Thyssenkrupp.

Robotics: The Next Gen in Subsea Vehicles

moment, as the fuel cell system has its strengths for enduring underwater tasks.For long range communication, on long missions, Thyssenkrupp MS is looking to use self-propelled modems, or autonomous communication nodes, with bi-directional data transmission capability, to create long-range acoustic communications through a chain of these nodes, as well as local navigation or 3D positioning via USBL modems. These are being developed under a sub-project called NaviMUM by EvoLogics and would be deployed from a revolver magazine on the MUM.EvoLogics calls the concept a self-organising mobile underwater network

(File photo: Kraken Robotics)

Kraken Sets Up Unmanned Vehicles Facility

the surface and without an operator on board. UMVs are split into three submarkets: AUVs, remotely operated underwater vehicles (ROV) and unmanned surface vehicles (USV).UMVs can range from very small vessels to that of a mid-sized ship or small submarine and are equipped with a variety of mapping, communications and navigation sensors. These systems are used in multiple applications such as naval mine detection, seafloor mapping, underwater asset infrastructure inspection, environmental characterization and others.Kraken President & CEO, Karl Kenny (Photo: Eric Haun)“The global UMV market is

(Photo: Riptide)

BAE Systems Acquires Riptide

unmatched flexibility by offeringa family of UUVs and integrated payload solutionscapable of supporting a variety of critical missions,” said Terry Crimmins, president of BAE Systems Electronic Systems. “Coupling our extensive expertise in sonar, signal processing, sensor fusion, undersea communications, electronic warfare, and autonomous systems with Riptide’s unique UUV platforms will enable us to affordably address rapidly expanding maritime mission requirements in the global defense, commercial, and research markets.”Jeff Smith, founder and president of Riptide Autonomous Solutions

(Photo: GEBCO-NF Alumni)

Shell Ocean Discovery XPRIZE Winner Annouced

competition that challenged teams to advance deep sea technologies for autonomous and unmanned, fast and high-resolution ocean exploration. The team's winning concept includes the use of a unique unmanned surface vessel (USV) / autonomous underwater vessel (AUV) and associated combination of communications hardware and software to process and transmit data remotely. The SEA-KIT USV, Maxlimer, built by Hushcraft in the UK, has a unique ability to launch and recover a KONGSBERG HUGIN AUV, and track it accurately on the surface during subsea survey operations. The autonomous navigation and AUV

Figure 6: A DOLPHIN Sonar trial result, SAS at three times Nyquist speed. Image: QinetiQ North America

DOLPHIN: Enabling Technology for Acoustic Systems

- a patented method using analog cancellation that eliminates receiver saturation and enables simultaneous transmit and receive.  Figure 1 describes this concept.Figure 1: The basic concept of DOLPHIN. Image: QinetiQ North AmericaApplication to Underwater TelemetrySince the beginning of acoustic communications, the state of the art technology has been limited to half-duplex signals: transmit with the receiver off and then turn the transmitter off and receiver on and wait to receive, because the direct transmission at the source saturates the receiver electronics if they are enabled simultaneously.

EIVA has joined the Sonardyne group of companies and will remain an independent Danish business and brand. (Photo: Sonardyne)

Sonardyne Acquires EIVA

founded and continues to own the company. “We are committed to a sustainable future for Sonardyne,” says Simon Partridge, Sonardyne’s Strategy Director, “which includes investing in complementary technologies and enterprises that supplement our core expertise in underwater communications, navigation, monitoring and imaging systems.”EIVA has more than 40 years’ experience in the development and delivery of software and hardware solutions to offshore and shallow water engineering and survey organisations and is increasingly supporting customers with their requirements

Sonarydne’s BlueComm depressor in the water at Aldabra, during the Nekton First Descent mission. Photo: Nekton Oxford Deep Ocean Research Institute

Unheard Underwater: Covert Communications

Technology that has helped to achieve world firsts in ocean exploration broadcasting could also provide the answer for covert operations in the defense realm, where communications need to go unheard. Traditionally, wireless subsea communications use acoustic signals. Sound is practical, because it travels further through water than electromagnetic waves. Using sound, information can be shared over many km. Unfortunately, it is also relatively easy to hear those sounds and target the source using passive sensors; including when beyond the actual range at which the signals are effective. For

Ocean Evolution (Photo: Oceaneering)

Support Vessel Delivered to Oceaneering

deck is designed to carry heavy loads and equipment, which accommodates a wide variety of missions. The deck is rated to support 10 metric tons per square meter, with a total cargo carrying capacity of 1,900 metric tons. The steel deck and on deck utilities including water, power, fuel and communications enables easier and faster loading, welding tie down and hook up of specialized deck equipment equipment during project mobilizations and demobilizations.The vessel’s 250-metric-ton AHC main crane offers a 4,000 meters working depth capacity and has a special lifting mode that allows heavy

Export Licensing: Tips U.S. Exporters Shouldn’t Overlook

, production equipment, and other related items. For marine technology exporters, key entries can be found in USML categories VI (surface vessels of war), XI (underwater electronics and acoustic systems), XII (optical and inertial sensors) and XX (submersible vessels); and CCL categories 5 (telecommunications), 6 (acoustic sensors), 7 (inertial sensors and navigation), and 8 (marine). • Different levels of technology can affect where you can export. The level of a product’s technology and market destination can be important factors as to whether an export license might be needed

Marine Technology Magazine Cover Jun 2019 - Hydrographic Survey: Single & Multibeam Sonar

Marine Technology Reporter is the world's largest audited subsea industry publication serving the offshore energy, subsea defense and scientific communities.

Subscribe
Marine Technology ENews subscription

Marine Technology ENews is the subsea industry's largest circulation and most authoritative ENews Service, delivered to your Email three times per week

Subscribe for MTR E-news