European Space Agency News

EOMAP showcased its contribution to the world-first 3D habitat map of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) at the International Forum on Satellite-Derived Bathymetry, SDB Day 2019 in Australia.

Making the Great Barrier Reef’s 3D Habitat Map

managing your budget—if you don’t know exactly how much you have, then how do you know what to do?”The ambitious scope of this undertaking was made possible by recent advances in satellite-mapping technologies, environmental modelling and image classification methods.Using the European Space Agency Sentinel-2 platform satellite imagery, EOMAP applies its industry leading, proprietary technology to retrieve satellite-derived bathymetry (SDB) and sub-surface reflectance (SSR).The result of the SDB mapping is a 3D elevation model of the seafloor—one of the cornerstone data layers

Photo courtesy of EOMAP

The Great Barrier Reef: 3D Habitat Map

managing your budget—if you don’t know exactly how much you have, then how do you know what to do?”The ambitious scope of this undertaking was made possible by recent advances in satellite-mapping technologies, environmental modelling and image classification methods.Using the European Space Agency Sentinel-2 platform satellite imagery, EOMAP applies its industry leading, proprietary technology to retrieve satellite-derived bathymetry (SDB) and sub-surface reflectance (SSR).The result of the SDB mapping is a 3D elevation model of the seafloor—one of the cornerstone data layers

Satellite Derived Bathymetry (SDB) at a resolution of 10m (Image: TCarta)

Satellite Derived Bathymetry Aids Hydrocarbon Exploration

use the water depth data for preparing seismic survey works off the coast of Myanmar.The SDB dataset, which covered a 30-square-kilometer area around Preparis Island in the Bay of Bengal, was generated by digitally extracting water depth measurements from multispectral imagery acquired by the European Space Agency’s Sentinel-2 satellite. The resulting bathymetric data had a point spacing of 10 meters with measurements to a depth of 15 meters.This process, according to TCarta CEO David Critchley, saves time and money.“Our processing team delivered the satellite derived bathymetry just a

The progression from Landsat satellite imagery, to a satellite derived bathymetry surface, to a bENC (Bathymetric Electronic Navigation Chart). The location is Golfo de Guanahacabibes, Cuba. (Credit: Aaron Sager)

MG3 & Satellite Derived Bathymetry

accuracy of TCarta marine products has compelled his team to acquire them for numerous projects in recent years. And now MG3 has played a role in making these and products more readily accessible to a wider group of end users in the marine community.In 2016, TCarta and DHI won a grant from the European Space Agency to help pay for development of an online portal to support direct sales of the off-the-shelf Satellite Derived Bathymetry data along with other geospatial marine products. The ESA grant required TCarta and DHI to include existing clients in the development of the portal, and MG3 gladly served

Photo from Catch the Next Wave at Oceanology International 2016 (Photo: Reed Exhibitions)

Parallel Events Add Depth to Oceanology International

and how each drives the other. The program features paired presentations from industry experts discussing the role technology has played in man’s ability to explore environments on the seafloor, in the oceans, on the oceans, over the oceans and into space and includes Gordon Campbell of the European Space Agency; diver, presenter and explorer Rory Golden, the first Irish diver to visit the site of RMS Titanic; and Dr Andone Lavery of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Registration costs £100 + VAT.   According to Catch the Next Wave 2018 chairman Ralph Rayner, “This creatively

NORsat-1 in EMC test at SFL. Two AIS antennas may be seen at the top, and four Langmuir probes off to the sides. The solar wings of the satellite are at the bottom. (Photo: Space Flight Laboratory)

Microsatellites Launched for Maritime Monitoring, Comms and Science

 The Space Flight Laboratory (SFL) announced the successful launch of two Norwegian microsatellites developed and built by SFL for the Norwegian Space Centre with support from the Norwegian Coastal Authority, Space Norway and the European Space Agency. The Soyuz-2.1a rocket carrying the satellites into orbit launched from Baikonur at 06:36:49 UTC Friday, July 14, 2017.   Shortly after launch both satellites were contacted from ground stations in Svalbard and Vardo, Norway. Both satellites are healthy based on initial telemetry, and commissioning is underway.   The first satellite

Thermal wavelength image of a large iceberg, which has calved off the Larsen C ice shelf. Darker colors are colder, and brighter colors are warmer, so the rift between the iceberg and the ice shelf appears as a thin line of slightly warmer area. Image from July 12, 2017, from the MODIS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite. (Image: NASA Worldview)

Giant Iceberg Breaks off Antarctica

Antarctic Survey.   The iceberg, which is roughly the size of the U.S. state of Delaware or the Indonesian island of Bali, has been close to breaking off for a few months.   Throughout the Antarctic winter, scientists monitored the progress of the rift in the ice shelf using the European Space Agency satellites.   "The iceberg is one of the largest recorded and its future progress is difficult to predict," said Adrian Luckman, professor at Swansea University and lead investigator of Project MIDAS, which has been monitoring the ice shelf for years.   "It may

Iain Wallace (Photo: Rovco)

Wallace Joins Rovco as CTO

U.K.-based subsea company Rovco has appointed Dr. Iain Wallace o its senior management team as chief technology officer (CTO).   A former technical lead for the European Space Agency, Wallace will drive the development of a real-time 3D vision system for ROVs and AUVs. He will also explore how artificial intelligence can be used to solve asset integrity issues by extracting actionable information from traditional video survey data.   As CTO, he will enhance Rovco’s underwater photogrammetric 3D modeling capabilities utilizing the latest simultaneous location and mapping (SLAM)

(Image: DFKI GmbH/ Meltem Yilmaz)

Exploring Alien Oceans with AUVs

;s ice surface shields an ocean, an estimated depth of 100km (62 miles) – the Mariana Trench, a shallow 11 kilometers (7 miles) by comparison.    While several spacecraft have already completed a mixture of long-term and flyby missions, 2030 will be the decade both NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) launch further data-collection missions of Europa’s environment and begin the search for life.    Mission Europa-Explorer The German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI GmbH) Robotics Innovation Center (RIC) launched the Europa-Explorer project in December

Photo: TEKEVER

Maritime Surveillance Drone Testing to Begin this Summer

The AR5 Life Ray UAS, developed by TEKEVER, has been selected by the European Space Agency (ESA) and the European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA) to demonstrate the first European maritime surveillance system where drones are integral to operations. The first demonstration will be performed this summer over the Maltese waters of the Mediterranean sea, said Pedro Sinogas, TEKEVER CEO, at the AUVSI Xponential show in New Orleans, La.   Maritime operations have been brought into focus in Europe by the unprecedented migrant crisis. As part of the response to this crisis the EU border patrol agency

Global map of the variations in the pull of gravity derived from satellite radar altimetry. http://topex.ucsd.edu/grav_outreach

Evolution of Ocean Exploration: Mapping the Seafloor with Geodesy

the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and Walter Smith from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have been using Earth’s gravity field data from the civilian and military satellite operators. By combining new radar altimeter measurements from satellites such as the European Space Agency’s (ESA) CryoSat-2 and NASA CNES Jason-1 with existing data, a global marine gravity model was constructed that is two times more accurate than previous models. The team of scientists included R. Dietmar Müller from the University of Sydney, EmmanuelGarcia of NOAA and Richard Francis

Marine Technology Magazine Cover Jun 2019 - Hydrographic Survey: Single & Multibeam Sonar

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