Methane Gas News

Seafloor map showing pockmark and micro-depressions in the seafloor off Big Sur. Image: © 2019 MBARI

Researchers Find Mysterious Seafloor Holes

sides than the pockmarks and are often elongated in one direction.Map showing the locations of some of the pockmarks and proposed wind-farm areas off Central California. Image: © 2019 MBARISeafloor pockmarks have been found elsewhere around the world, and have been associated with releases of methane gas or other fluids from the seafloor. Such methane releases could potentially cause the seafloor to be unstable, which could pose risks for structures such as offshore oil platforms or wind turbines.  However MBARI researchers found no evidence of methane in the sediment or seawater in this

(Photo: MES-HD)

New Tech Simulates Methane Hydrate Recovery

deposits and cobalt rich crust.In particular, shallow methane hydrate — an ice-like solid material composed of water and methane molecules — can only exist in stable form under the low-temperature, high-pressure conditions of the seabed. Methane hydrate partially dissociates into methane gas and water as it is being raised from the seabed to the ocean surface, leading to major changes in the proportions of solid (methane hydrate), gas (methane) and liquid (seawater) in vertical lifting pipes used to raise the material to the surface.Developers seeking to design equipment for subsea

“During this summer we had the drilling operation based on our 3D and 4D images. But CAGE undertook several expeditions this year that also focused on retrieving data regarding the development of marine ecosystems in the dark ocean floor areas of the Arctic.” – Prof. Jürgen Mienert, CAGE Director (Photo: CAGE)

Methane: The Arctic's Buried Treasure

carbon recycling system related to gas hydrates from the sub-seabed to the atmosphere. First, we accomplish 4D time-lapse seismic studies to visualize potential sub-seabed gas hydrate accumulation and gas migration pathway areas. Second, we work in the water column taking both ocean spatial and methane gas concentration measurements using different types of laser spectrometers but also test new technologies in collaboration with the Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Géophysique de l’Environnement (LGGE) in Grenoble, France. Oxygen isotope measurements identify where the methane sources

WHOI scientist Anna Michel and WHOI engineer Jason Kapit test a prototype long-range laser spectroscopy system. One telescope shoots out a laser beam that is recorded by the downstream telescope. In between, methane gas in the air absorbs some of the laser light. The more methane in the air, the less light arrives at the far end. (Photo by Ken Kostel, WHOI)

Let There Be Laser Light

could illuminate key environmental gases   Earth’s warming climate is poised to cause changes on our planet. In the Arctic, permafrost has begun to thaw, releasing methane, a heat-trapping greenhouse gas, into the atmosphere. On the seafloor, warmer ocean temperatures threaten to release methane gas by thawing solid deposits of methane hydrates found in cold depths.    Such changes are potentially momentous, but how can we detect evidence that they are happening? How can we measure tiny trickles of gases wafting over enormous and remote areas?    One answer may lie

Two of Stinger’s VideoRay Pro 4 ROVs.  (Photo Credit: Bjarte Langeland / Stinger)

ROV Put to the Test

after being called into action, thanks to its “home” position on the seafloor. Having an on-call ROV system can significantly reduce the time and resources needed for an ROV operation, especially in emergency situations. Stinger also wanted to test the use of a resident ROV to monitor methane gas buildup, which pose a threat to offshore oil & gas operations. If left undetected, gas buildups can cause explosions, resulting in costly and even fatal damages to wells, platforms and the environment. These buildups are especially of critical concern in Norway, where methane levels have risen

Seaquito, Stinger's permanently deployed VideoRay Pro 4 ROV system, "lives" in a small crate on the floor of the North Sea near Stavanger, Norway. The ROV has not surfaced since it was deployed in November 2013, and has continued to operate successfully underwater for 19 months. (Photo: Bjarte Langeland / Stinger)

ROV Survives 19-month Continuous Deployment

, thanks to its "home" position on the seafloor. Having an on-call ROV system can significantly reduce the time and resources needed for an ROV operation, especially in emergency situations when every minute counts.   Stinger also wanted to test the use of a resident ROV to monitor methane gas buildup, which pose an enormous threat to offshore oil and gas operations. If left undetected, gas buildups can cause explosions, resulting in costly and even fatal damages to wells, platforms and the environment. These buildups are especially of critical concern in Norway, where methane levels

L-R: Jürgen Mienert, Director, CAGE and Arild Brevik, Konsberg Maritime.

Kongsberg to Deliver Ocean Observatories for Seabed Research

the forefront of development,” said Benedicte Ferré, team leader at CAGE responsible for the observatories. The ocean observatories will be used as instruments in CAGE’s research activities related to frozen methane hydrates under the seabed in the Arctic areas and monitoring of methane gas leaks from natural processes. Monitoring of methane in the water column is essential to understand possible effects on the marine ecosystem and the atmosphere. CO2, ocean acidification and circulation are among other parameters monitored, together with monitoring of marine life. The data from

Sally Jewell: Photo courtesy NASCC

US Secretary of Interior Honors BOEM Ocean Research Teams

renewable energy planning and operations. The mid-Atlantic canyons  study team consisted of researchers from 17 institutions. Scientists discovered abundant deep-water coral habitats off the mid-Atlantic outer continental shelf, and vast communities of deep-sea mussels that depend upon methane gas seeps for sustenance. “Congratulations to all the people and organizations represented here today,” said BOEM Director and Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Land and Minerals Management Tommy P. Beaudreau. “We recognize the hard work and dedication that is required

LNG Bunkering: All One Needs to Know ...

In his newly published book, industry expert Nigel Draffin answers the key questions about LNG bunker fuel. The publishers, Petrospot, say that Nigel Draffin answers the key questions about LNG bunker fuel in his usual informative and lucid style. He looks at the properties of methane, gas-only and dual fuel engines, tank design, fuel and safety systems, as well as onboard and onshore storage and safety issues. Potential problem areas in the use of LNG, such as weathering, sloshing and methane slip, are sensibly and clearly analysed. Liquefied natural gas is poised to become a viable and widely

Photo: Hydro-Lek

HyBIS ROV Positions Ocean Bottom Seismometers

was deployed to position Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) and Ocean Bottom Electromagnetic Receivers (OBEM) on the seafloor in the Arctic Ocean. The expedition was conducted by members of the Marine Geology team from Southampton’s National Oceanographic Center (NOC) to collect data from sites of methane gas and seafloor gas vents. HyBIS, a mnemonic for Hydraulic Benthic Interactive Sampler, is a 6,000m-rated, fully modular, electro-hydraulic platform designed to operate in conjunction with existing deck handling and cable systems.  The vehicle comprises an upper command and power unit with

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