University Of California San Diego News

Crab Comms: "It's not hunger pains, I just want to talk ..."

Scientists Discover New Method of Communication in Crabs: Ghost crabs use structure in their stomach to communicate when agitated.  Researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and the University of California Berkeley have discovered a new method of communication in the Atlantic ghost crab, Ocypode quadrata. The findings were published September 11 in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences.Using a combination of research methods, the scientists found that Atlantic ghost crabs – native to the western Atlantic

Seawater temperature measurements taken at Scripps Pier. (Photo Credit: Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego)

#Oi2020 History

During the summer of 2018, a research team at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego logged in the warmest sea surface temperature at the Ellen Browning Scripps Memorial Pier. According to Scripps, the logged temperature was 78.6 degrees Fahrenheit—the highest since recording began in August 1916—and the same year Scripps researchers began sea-surface temperature and salinity readings at the pier.In 1925, Scripps began taking seafloor water temperature measurements, and the daily collection is still completed by hand and maintained by the institution&rs

Weddell Sea polynya, initally 3,700 square miles, 2017. False color NASA satellite image shows ice in blue, clouds in white. (Photo: Scripps Institution of Oceanography)

Robotic Data Help Explain Mysterious Holes

had a chance to truly monitor the unexpected gap in Antarctic winter sea ice. It was an opportunity that came about as a result of uncanny timing and a seasoned oceanographer’s knowledge of the sea.A new study co-authored by researchers from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego combines satellite images of the sea ice cover and data collected by robotic drifters and even seals outfitted with sensors to better understand the phenomenon. The research led by the University of Washington (UW) explores why this hole appears only some years, and what role it could

Image by Pacific Power Group

Scripps Adds New Research Vessel

The Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego has added to its fleet a fourth research vessel, which was constructed by Armstrong Marine. The research vessel Bob and Betty Beyster is expected to launch in mid-April for use in San Diego.Armstrong Marine of Port Angeles, Washington, designed the 42-foot aluminum hulled boat. Pacific Power Group, working closely with Armstrong, fit the vessel with a Volvo Penta IPS 650 propulsion system. This is the first time PPG has mated the IPS configuration with an aluminum hulled boat.“We took a lot of time with the Scripps

Walter Munk, 2017 (Photo: Erik Jepsen/UC San Diego)

Walter Munk: 1917-2019

Walter Munk, who gave the Allies a strategic edge in World War II, helped nurture a university into existence, and became a living synonym for oceanography, died February 8 at his home in La Jolla, Calif. He was 101.As a geophysicist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego, Munk made groundbreaking observations of waves, ocean temperature, tidal energy in the deep ocean, ocean acoustics and the rotation of the earth. As an advocate of science and broader scholarship, Munk served as an advisor to presidents and the Pentagon and conferred with public figures

Zooglider (top) with a selection of zooplankton imagery the robot has captured. Top photo: Benjamin Whitmore

New Robot Can Sense Plankton Optically and Acoustically

and engineers have modified a common physical oceanography instrument to be able to image zooplankton as it glides through the ocean.The robot, a first-of-its-kind sensing instrument dubbed Zooglider by Mark Ohman, a biological oceanographer at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego, uses as its platform a Scripps-developed glider known as Spray. Ohman and Scripps instrument developers outfitted the torpedo-shaped Spray gliders with a camera (called Zoocam) and a device researchers call Zonar that gathers acoustic data about zooplankton – free-drifting microscopic

GeoSpectrum Technologies C-BASS low frequency sources (Image: GTI)

GTI to Supply Low Frequency Sources to Scripps

GeoSpectrum Technologies (GTI) announces it will supply the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (University of California San Diego) with two “C-BASS” low frequency sources.This new technology will allow researchers to conduct low frequency acoustic experiments more efficiently and less expensively than previously possible, GTI said. A successful field trial at Seneca Lake last December caught the attention of Scripps, resulting in the purchase.The fully coherent C-BASS are tuned to operate at 34 Hz and are capable of continuous operation. The energy efficient sources are physically

A dive team investigates sonar targets collected via the REMUS 100 AUV,  with RV Norseman II sailing in the background (Photo: NOAA)

US Destroyer Wreckage Discovered off Remote Alaskan Island

World War II.Heroic action by the crew saved the ship, but for the families of the doomed Sailors, the final resting place of loved ones lost in the predawn hours of Aug. 18, 1943 remained unknown.On July 17, a NOAA-funded team of scientists from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and the University of Delaware discovered the missing 75- foot stern section in 290 feet of water off of Kiska, one the few United States territories to be occupied by foreign forces in the last 200 years.“This is a significant discovery that will shed light on this little-known

The front of Antarctica's Getz Ice Shelf. (Photo: Jeremy Harbeck/NASA)

Strong El Niño Events Cause Large Antarctic Ice Loss -Study

Earth and Space Science Fellowship, provides new insights into how Antarctic ice shelves respond to variability in global ocean and atmospheric conditions.   The study was led by Fernando Paolo while a PhD graduate student and postdoc at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego. Paolo is now a postdoctoral scholar at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Paolo and his colleagues, including Scripps glaciologist Helen Fricker, discovered that a strong El Niño event causes ice shelves in the Amundsen Sea sector of West Antarctica to gain mass at the

Parchment tubeworm in the field (Photo by Dr. Evelien De Meulenaere, Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego)

Scientists Say Sea Worm May Have Superpowers

 A common sea worm that resides in muddy coastal seafloors may have powers that could potentially impact human health, according to researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego.   Researchers discovered that a parchment tubeworm, the marine invertebrate Chaetopterus sp. – which is also known for its bioluminescence – is able to produce an important protein found in nearly all living organisms, ferritin, eight times more efficiently than humans.   “We were surprised to discover that even though the tubeworm ferritin is

Marine Technology Magazine Cover Oct 2019 - Ocean Observation: Gliders, Buoys & Sub-Surface Networks

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