Arctic Sea News

Photo Courtesy of National Oceanography Centre

#Oi2020 History

 In 2015, researchers at the National Oceanography Center (NOC) used Royal Navy submarine data to investigate the nature of turbulence in the ocean beneath the Arctic sea-ice. This is mainly because recent decreases in Arctic sea ice may have a big impact on the circulation, chemistry and biology of the Arctic Ocean, because of ice-free waters becoming more turbulent. By revealing more about how these turbulent motions distribute energy within the ocean, the findings from this study provide information important for accurate predictions of the future of the Arctic Ocean. The melting of Arctic

© Alexander/Adobe Stock

July: Earth's Hottest Month Ever Recorded

Administration (NOAA), July 2019 was hottest month on record for the planet and Polar sea ice melted to record lows.Much of the planet sweltered in unprecedented heat in July, as temperatures soared to new heights in the hottest month ever recorded. The record warmth also shrank Arctic and Antarctic sea ice to historic lows.The average global temperature in July was 1.71 degrees F above the 20th-century average of 60.4 degrees, making it the hottest July in the 140-year record, according to scientists at NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information. The previous hottest month on

Dr. Matthew Asplin (Photo: ASL Enviromental Sciences)

ASL Hires Dr. Asplin

knowledge study through direct consultations with residents in three coastal communities in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region.  Dr. Asplin completed a Ph.D. at the University of Manitoba under Dr. David Barber investigating how Arctic storms influence dynamic and thermodynamic processes in Arctic sea ice and across the ocean-sea ice atmosphere interface, and how these processes might change with climate change.  This project details an emerging ice-free Arctic ocean over the past decade that reveals a surface that absorbs and retains more solar radiation and thus is apt to be characterized

Resourceful: Norwegian AUV and oceanographic researchers work in sync. Photo Credit: Professor Martin Ludvigsen, NTNU AMOS

The “Disruption” in AUV Trends

. King among these is payload, from which market disruption is just waiting to happen. Changing payloads of artificial intelligence, management software, and researcher resourcefulness now combine with entrepreneurial technologists to inject uncertainty into AUV market forecasts.On a stormy night in an arctic sea, waves of salt water slosh against the hull of a light, unmanned surface vessel. A sleek, yellow “torpedo” is robotically hoisted into the water by the robot davits. As the AUV swims off into the darkness and submerges, a tube rights itself and launches a rocket packing a satellite

Small remnants of thicker, multiyear ice float with thinner, seasonal ice in the Beaufort Sea on Sept. 30, 2016. Credit: NASA/GSFC/Alek Petty

Arctic Sea Ice is Youngest and Thinnest Now

to weather and wind, so ice thickness is now more variable, rather than dominated by the effect of global warming, according to NASA's Earth Science News Team.Working from a combination of satellite records and declassified submarine sonar data, NASA scientists have constructed a 60-year record of Arctic sea ice thickness. Right now, Arctic sea ice is the youngest and thinnest its been since we started keeping records.More than 70 percent of Arctic sea ice is now seasonal, which means it grows in the winter and melts in the summer, but doesn't last from year to year. This seasonal ice melts faster

Soundnine XTP Sensors Deployed on Polar Buoy

measure the Upper layer Temperature of the Polar Oceans. The buoy was deployed in northern Hudson bay on June 14, 2018 by Canadian research icebreaker CCGS Amundsen. It transmits real-time temperature and conductivity data to 25 meters deep, enabling scientists to measure the rate of surface warming as Arctic sea ice increasingly thins and retreats each summer.Pacific Gyre Inc. integrated Soundnine’s inductive modem and seven XTP sensors into a modified drifting buoy. The XTP sensors are accurate to 0.005 deg. C; 10 to 20 times more accurate than temperature sensors on previous UpTempO buoys. The

(Source: NOAA Climate.gov, Data: Mark Tschudi)

Old Sea Ice is Disappearing from the Arctic Ocean

Sea ice grows throughout the fall and winter, and melts throughout the spring and summer. But not all Arctic sea ice melts; some portion of the ice survives at least one melt season, persisting throughout the summer months. This ice is usually thicker and more resistant to melt than ice that's less than a year old, and therefore more likely than first-year ice to survive the coming melt season. As Arctic sea ice often reaches its maximum extent around late February or early March (around the ninth week of the calendar year) that's a good time to measure multiyear versus first-year ice.In the

(Illustration by Natalie Renier, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

Atlantic Ocean Circulation at Weakest Point in 1,600 Years

12th issue of Nature.Lead author Dr. David Thornalley, a senior lecturer at University College London and WHOI adjunct, believes that as the North Atlantic began to warm near the end of the Little Ice Age, freshwater disrupted the system, called the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). Arctic sea ice, and ice sheets and glaciers surrounding the Arctic began to melt, forming a huge natural tap of fresh water that gushed into the North Atlantic. This huge influx of freshwater diluted the surface seawater, making it lighter and less able to sink deep, slowing down the AMOC system.To investigate

© André Gilden / Adobe Stock

Melting Sea Ice: A Canary in the Coal Mine

The rapid loss of Arctic sea ice is a sentinel. Most of us will never venture into the Arctic, but it can and does provide us with a forewarning of impacts coming to our parts of the Earth – and some of the most significant impacts will directly affect the maritime industry.   In earlier times, coal miners were sometimes overcome by the buildup of odorless carbon monoxide gas. Some died as a consequence. Eventually it was realized that canaries were more susceptible to the gas than were humans. They would collapse in the presence of lower concentrations of carbon monoxide than the level

Photo credit: Arctic Council Secretariat / Linnea Nordström

Arctic Council Meeting Stirs Hidden Tensions

sea ice melts due to global warming, sea lanes open, but ice can rapidly freeze over. This makes passage perilous for ships, so icebreakers are important assets.   An annual assessment of worldwide threats released on Thursday by Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats said competition over Arctic sea routes and resources will include countries already active in the region - but also some others that are not.   The report did not mention China's interest in the Arctic, but the country is making moves. It became an observer member of the Arctic Council in 2013. And in April, news broke

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