Bluefin Robotics News

Photo: General Dynamics

General Dynamics Launches New Bluefin-12

General Dynamics Mission Systems released the new Bluefin-12 autonomous unmanned underwater vehicle at Defense and Security Equipment International (DSEI) 2019.This new vehicle builds upon the proven Bluefin autonomy and uses shared Bluefin Robotics’ core capabilities, increased mission modularity and embedded intelligence to complete users’ long endurance, high-consequence and changing missions.The base Bluefin-12’s extended modularity supports the integration of user-designated sensors and payloads to deliver new mission-critical capabilities.The Bluefin Robotics core autonomy with

Bluefin-9 unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV). Image: General Dynamics Mission Systems

MTR100: General Dynamics Mission Systems

of open architecture and mission integration to meet the most demanding operational requirements on any platform in the multi-domain operational arenas – from the outer reaches of space to the sea floor. In 2016 General Dynamics acquired the unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) provider, Bluefin Robotics, to extend the integration of high consequence solutions to the unmanned undersea space. The integration of Bluefin Robotics transitioned more than 20 years of UUV development and  sustainment experience into the larger General Dynamics portfolio. General Dynamics has focused continued

A Hugin AUV being launched (Courtesy Kongsberg)

Unmanned Vehicles: 25 Years of Milestones

program supported by these vehicles, sponsored by the Office of Naval Research (ONR), was known as the Autonomous Ocean Sampling Network. This pioneered designs for docking AUVs. Experiments in seafloor mapping and mine hunting were also conducted during the first ten years of the AUV Lab. In 1997 Bluefin Robotics was founded to transition these ideas into industry, the first of many commercial AUV manufacturers to follow.The Odyssey technology developments touched upon all domains. The core developments in unmanned vehicle control inspired today’s software communities. In particular the Mission

(Photo: Jayne Doucette, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

WHOI Test Site Aims to Boost Marine Robotics Sector

underwater vehicles was $2.2 billion in 2015, but is expected to grow to $4.6 billion by 2020. Cape Cod and the South Coast of Massachusetts are hotbeds for the development of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), as the Commonwealth is home to numerous industry leading companies, including Bluefin Robotics in Quincy, Hydroid in Pocasset, and McLane Research Laboratories in Falmouth

Knifefish mine countermeasure UUV (Photo: General Dynamics Mission Systems)

Knifefish UUV Completes Sea Acceptance Tests

the operators with an opportunity to become familiarized with the Knifefish system and become proficient at operating and maintaining the system during the upcoming evaluations.As prime contractor for the Knifefish program, General Dynamics Mission Systems designed the tactical UUV based on the Bluefin Robotics Bluefin-21 deep-water Autonomous Undersea Vehicle (AUV) using an open architecture concept that can be quickly and efficiently modified to accommodate a wide range of missions.Knifefish operates as an off-board sensor capable of autonomously detecting, classifying and identifying buried, bottom

(Photo: General Dynamics Mission Systems)

GD Mission Systems: Full-throttle Charge toward Autonomy

using an open architecture concept that can be quickly and efficiently modified to accommodate a wide range of missions that may face future naval operations. The Knifefish UUV, which is intended for deployment from Navy vessels such as the Littoral Combat Ship, is based on the General Dynamics Bluefin Robotics Bluefin-21 deep-water autonomous undersea vehicle).   So concisely, what is unique about the KnifeFish platform? Two things. I’ve already told you that we have brought it to where it is a producible, usable, reliable – and at a price point – that nothing else is (at)

U.S. Navy Knifefish mine countermeasures UUV swims along the surface off the coast of Boston during final contractor sea trials earlier this fall. (Photo: General Dynamics Mission Systems)

Knifefish UUV Completes Contractor Trials

UUV using an open architecture concept that can be quickly and efficiently modified to accommodate a wide range of missions that may face future naval operations. The Knifefish UUV, which is intended for deployment from Navy vessels such as the Littoral Combat Ship, is based on the General Dynamics Bluefin Robotics Bluefin-21 deep-water autonomous undersea vehicle (AUV). It is designed to reduce risk to personnel by operating in the minefield as an off-board sensor while the host ship stays outside the minefield boundaries.   "This round of contractor testing demonstrated the continued improvement

Martin Klein with a Klein  multibeam side scan sonar. “We were proud that side scan was able to finally replace the old wire drag technology.” (courtesy Martin Klein and the MIT Museum)

Klein's Side Scan Sonar, Then and Now

involved for many years with Sea Grant. The Sea Grant program is also 50 years old this year. And I’ve been involved with it in various ways since it began in 1967, especially at MIT and the University of New Hampshire. A lot of the autonomous vehicle technology was developed at MIT. The company Bluefin [Robotics] got its start as spinoff from MIT Sea Grant, and so I think that is making a big difference in our abilities to do ocean exploration.   Are there any technologies in development now that you’re keeping an eye on or see as particularly exciting? MK: I keep an eye out

U.S. Navy mine test targets being readied for Knifefish at-sea mine-hunting evaluation (Photo: General Dynamics Mission Systems)

US Navy Tests UUV for Mine-hunting Operations

is the prime contractor for the Knifefish program. The company designed the tactical UUV using an open architecture concept that can be quickly and efficiently modified to accommodate a wide range of missions that may face future naval operations. The Knifefish UUV is based on the General Dynamics Bluefin Robotics Bluefin-21 deep-water AUV. 

The Bluefin SandShark is a one-person-portable, low-cost autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) designed to leverage today’s miniaturized sensors and small enough to be carried in a backpack. (Credit: General Dynamics Mission Systems)

Bluefin SandShark AUV is Ready to Order

and dive down to 200 meters (656 feet). The tail section of the Bluefin SandShark houses the battery and system electronics and is designed to leave most of the vehicle open for the user to customize with sensors and other mission critical payloads. The Bluefin SandShark joins the company’s Bluefin Robotics family of autonomous underwater products.   “Compared to other small AUVs, the Bluefin SandShark offers customers the most flexibility and diverse mission capabilities at a very affordable cost,” said Carlo Zaffanella, vice president and general manager of Maritime and Strategic

Marine Technology Magazine Cover Nov 2019 - MTR White Papers: Subsea Vehicles

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