Deep Sea Mining News

Image Credit;  alswart/AdobeStock

Fincantieri, Saipem in Deep-Seabed Mining Tie-up

Italian shipbuilding firm Fincantieri, and its compatriot energy services company Saipem have signed an agreement to promote the development of deep-seabed mining (DSM), i.e. the sustainable exploitation of deep-sea floors over 3,000 meters in depth. The memorandum of understanding signed between the two companies sets the ground for a strategic partnership aimed at developing and pursuing business opportunities in the field of designing, engineering, building, and managing DSM systems."Deep-sea floors are rich in minerals, mostly sulfides (sulfur), cobalt crusts, and polymetallic nodules

A computer-generate view of the seafloor that shows some of the hydrothermal chimneys in the Endeavour hydrothermal vent field. © 2020 MBARI

MBARI: Hydrothermal Mapping is Heating up

;s new maps to plan research dives and the location of monitoring equipment. Additionally, data can be used to estimate the volume and mass of hydrothermal deposits in the chimneys, which is critical for understanding the distribution of metal-rich rocks around vents, some of which have been targeted for deep-sea mining

© Alex / Adobe Stock

Deep Sea Mining Could Destroy Undiscovered Species, Says Ocean Panel

Mining on the sea floor should not begin before a full assessment of likely environmental impacts can be made, a report commissioned by the High Level Panel for a Sustainable Ocean Economy (Ocean Panel) said on Wednesday.Environmentalists including Britain's David Attenborough have called for a ban on deep-seabed mining that would extract resources including copper, cobalt, nickel, zinc, lithium, and rare earth elements from nodules on the ocean floor.The International Seabed Authority (ISA), a U.N. body headquartered in Jamaica, has drawn up regulations on exploration, but has yet to establish the

© Alex / Adobe Stock

Indonesia Processing Requests for Deep-sea Mining Waste Disposal

domestic smelters.The government is keen to produce stainless steel and battery-grade chemicals from nickel laterite, and eventually manufacture batteries and electric vehicles.Environmentalists, however, are concerned such developments will damage the local ecosystem.“Two companies have requested deep-sea tailing permits. One is based on Obi Island and another is from Morowali,” Safri Burhanuddin, a senior official at the Coordinating Ministry of Maritime and Investment Affairs, told a virtual media briefing.Harita Group is building a high-pressure acid leaching plant on Obi Island to extract

(Photo: Allseas)

Drillship to Be Converted for Subsea Mining

Swiss-based offshore contractor Allseas said it has acquired an ultra-deepwater drillship for conversion to a polymetallic nodule collection vessel.In partnership with deep sea mining company DeepGreen Metals Inc., Allseas is developing a deep-sea mineral collection system to recover polymetallic nodules from the ocean floor and transfer them to the surface for transportation to shore. The nodules contain high grades of nickel, manganese, copper and cobalt—key metals required for building electric vehicle batteries and renewable energy technologies.The former Vitoria 10000 will be converted to

Photo: OceanGate

OceanGate, NASA Testing Carbon Fiber Pressure Vessels

NASA and OceanGate enter into an agreement to collaborate in the development, manufacturing and testing of new carbon fiber pressure vessels. The resulting pressure vessel will be used for the deep-sea submersibles.NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, will serve as the facility where the development and manufacturing of a new aerospace-grade hull is completed. This design effort is key to OceanGate completing its latest Cyclops-class submersible that is intended to dive to 6,000 meters (19,800 feet) with five crew members on board.“We continue to receive more

Solwara 1 project seabed mining tools. Courtesy Nautilus Minerals.

Will 2020 be the year for Subsea Mining?

for long has heard of plans for mining various minerals located on or just below the seafloor. In fact, when Howard Hughes built the Glomar Explorer in 1972, the cover story for its true mission – recovering a Soviet submarine - was that the rig would be used to mine manganese nodules from the deep ocean floor.  This cover story was so effective that it had the unintended consequence of stirring great interest in ocean mining among offshore companies and the general public.In the years since, there has been a great deal of research and exploration in this field.  However, except for

(Photo: OceanGate)

OceanGate to Build Two New Submersibles

OceanGate said it plans to build two additional manned submersibles for deep ocean exploration and commercial operations to the Titanic wreck site and beyond.The Everett, Wash.-based company, which already owns and operates a fleet of three manned submersibles rated between 305 meters to 4,000 meters, said it has begun the construction planning for two subs rated for even greater depths in response to increasing demand for commercial and private access to manned submersibles.“Increasing demand for Titanic missions, deep-sea research and environmental supervision of deep-sea mining have further

Cobalt-rich ferromanganese crust in the Pacific Ocean. (Photo: Christopher Kelley / NOAA)

China Leading the Deep Sea Mining Race

by China Minmetals to discuss next steps in moving from exploration to the development of deep-sea mineral resources. (Photo: ISA)There is also interest from European countries including Belgium, Britain, Germany and Poland, as well as from the Middle East.However, no one has yet demonstrated that deep sea mining can be cost effective and some non-governmental organizations have questioned whether it would be possible to reach a deal on exploitation rules next year."I think, it's pretty good. I think the current draft is largely complete," Lodge said, when asked about prospects of adopting

Marine Technology Magazine Cover Jun 2020 -

Marine Technology Reporter is the world's largest audited subsea industry publication serving the offshore energy, subsea defense and scientific communities.

Subscribe
Marine Technology ENews subscription

Marine Technology ENews is the subsea industry's largest circulation and most authoritative ENews Service, delivered to your Email three times per week

Subscribe for MTR E-news