Fisheries Management News

(Photo: FarSounder)

3D Sonar Used in Fishery Research

firm FarSounder said its 3D-Sonar will allow researchers to detect and assess the fish in the sonar imagery as part of the fisheries project. Using coordinated ground-truthing methods, it is expected that the results from the project will help improve current food web models and local Rhode Island fisheries management.For this project, FarSounder is collaborating with the University of Rhode Island (URI) and the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management (DEM). The pelagic fish data collection is taking place aboard the R/V Cap’n Bert, a stern trawler owned and operated by the URI Department

Pic: SAExploration

SAExploration Completes Ocean-Bottom Project

Officer, said: “I am very proud of SAE’s project management and operational teams who performed extremely well on a very large and very complex project. Some of the challenges they faced included subsurface and surface infrastructure, such as 46 separate platforms, in addition to fisheries management and field-level SIMOPS.""We continue to champion the broader acceptance and cost-effective application of ocean-bottom nodal recording technology and we look forward to offering our technical expertise and enhanced experience within this growing market to other customers in the future

Photo Courtesy USCG

Global Fishing Watch, USCG Examine Illegal Fishing

Global Fishing Watch is teaming up with the United States Coast Guard Research & Development Center (CG RDC) to conduct research on illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing and share analysis to advance global efforts to improve fisheries management.Global Fishing Watch (https://globalfishingwatch.org) and CG RDC are exploring pathways to collaborate on relevant research activities, such as the establishment of analytical methodologies to evaluate open-source vessel movement data, catch data and satellite imagery, to advance international understanding on IUU fishing and its impacts.

Echogram of diel plankton migration. (Image: Nortek)

New Acoustic Technology Aids Fisheries Management

As fish and other marine life grow increasingly important for feeding a human population on the rise, how can high-tech acoustic-based scientific instruments assist fisheries management, while also opening up opportunities for interdisciplinary research?Fishery scientists and managers working to keep stocks sustainable rely on state-of-the-art scientific instrumentation to better understand the dynamics and structure of fish stocks, as well as the resources those fish depend on. Echosounders can help quantify the biomass and behavior of fish, as well as the plankton and/or krill that many fish species

Oliver Steeds, Nekton CEO - Diving into an ocean of possibilities (Photo: Nekton)

Nekton Aids Exploring Ocean's Potential

Ocean Research Institute to give it its full name, believes we are standing on “the threshold of catastrophe”; watching in a state of seeming paralysis, or ignorance, as “our oceans approach bankruptcy”. Deoxygenation is suffocating them, pollution is clogging them, poor fisheries management is emptying them, and we are heating them, with human activity causing thermal expansion and unprecedented sea level rise. “It represents a profound existential crisis for our planet,” he states bluntly, before fanning his arms out widely to add: “But look around you. We&rsquo

Photo: WWF

Technology Advances Fisheries Management

Real or near-real time management of Pacific purse seine tuna fisheries is now possible for the first time in history, changing the game for fisheries management.   Observer electronic reporting tools – through the new Observer eReporting App –will now be used to help reduce illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing and bolster supply chain transparency and traceability in the Western and Central Pacific tuna fisheries.   A 2016 analysis conducted by the Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency (FFA) showed that nonreporting, misreporting and underreporting represented

MBARI engineer Brian Kieft with researchers from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) on board the USGS vessel with the Tethys LRAUV, in the southern portion of Lake Michigan (Credit: Brett Hobson © 2016 MBARI)

AUV Mission in the Great Lakes

than sampling with an AUV.   That’s where MBARI’s long-range AUV Tethys comes in. In August 2016 Tethys spent nearly a month traversing the entire body of Lake Michigan to gather data for the study of the lake’s planktonic food webs and provide valuable insight for fisheries management and climate change research.   “The USGS is tasked with trying to understand the entire ecosystem of the Great Lakes, which is a big challenge,” said MBARI mechanical engineer, Brett Hobson. “Because they needed to make basin-scale observations and were interested

© Arndt Vladimir / Adobe Stock

New Research to Examine Oil Spill Impacts

Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and Alabama. Working with key fisheries stakeholders and local decision makers, the team plans to identify adaptive strategies that communities could use to mitigate the effects of future oil spills. This project has the potential to transform disaster planning and fisheries management responses to such disasters in the Gulf of Mexico and elsewhere.   All three Gulf Research Program grants awarded Thursday support projects that will generate new insights, address critical questions, or lead to new approaches to interpreting data by bringing together concepts and methods

Five UC San Diego Professors Named AAAS Fellows

and climate change.” Carson has developed widely used methods for assessing the benefits and costs of environmental policies and the economic impacts of environmental disasters. His projects have ranged from analyzing the benefits of the U.S. Clean Water Act and examining the impacts of fisheries management to studying visibility improvements in the Grand Canyon and preventing residential water shortages in California cities. After the Exxon Valdez oil spill, he served as a principal investigator on economic damage assessments for the State of Alaska and more recently for the National Oceanic

A shipping vessel navigates Canada’s Arctic waters. The MEOPAR network and Irving Shipbuilding announced $1.8 million in funding to support nine ocean research initiatives, including three projects to ensure safer, more culturally sensitive shipping and improved emergency response abilities in Canada’s Arctic. (Photo: Irving Shipbuilding)

MEOPAR, Irving Shipbuilding Support Ocean Research

occur in nine Canadian provinces and two territories, including regions of the Canadian Arctic.   The selected projects are: Prioritizing Threat Management Strategies to Ensure Long-term Resilience of the Fraser River Estuary - Julia Baum, University of Victoria Assisting Fisheries Management by Integration of Data from Non-Specialized Assets, Ferries, Citizens & Satellites - Maycira Costa, University of Victoria Arctic Marine Activities Integration & Synthesis Project (AMAIS): Enhancing Ocean Governance Through the Northern Marine Transportation Corridors - 

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