Mining News

Photo: Teledyne

GOT: Comes to Life Using Teledyne Lidar

of the old city of Dubrovnik, the model for the fictional city of King’s Landing.Lidar is becoming increasingly popular for creating realistic computer-generated imagery (CGI) and visual special effects. Traditionally, lidar has been used for mapping and in construction, civil engineering, mining and transportation. Lidar is now of particular interest in the film industry because of its ability to scan buildings or even entire cities in 3D, while maintaining a high level of detail and accuracy. Lidar’s ability to generate exact replicas of locations reduces the time and cost for 3D

Photo: OSIL

Increasing Global Demand for OSIL Sediment Grabs

capacity benthic grabs, including the ubiquitous Van Veen grab (available in various sizes and bucket configurations), with recent shipments going to academic and government organizations, as well as commercial outfits, for use on site investigations, baseline surveys, dredge monitoring and deep sea mining projects. All grabs are manufactured from 316 Stainless Steel with optional ballast weights available for increased penetration, as well as landing tables to aid sample recovery for more complex designs. Bucket sieves and sieving tables are also available.The robust sediment grab range compliments

IBM Canada Joins COVE

.”IBM has a unique approach to collaboration that provides academic researchers, small and large business, start-ups and developers with business strategies and computing tools they need to innovate. Other areas of focus for IBM Canada include health, agile computing, water, energy, cities, mining, advanced manufacturing, digital media and cybersecurity

Out-of-this-world: a UX-1 HROV. Photo: EU UNEXMIN Project

Subsea Mining: The Next Big Thing for UUVs

In Europe, there are sure signs that underwater mining is the next big market for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) and new “drones” called HROV, DART or TURTLE. Among the indicators is the involvement of mining companies, governments, rich subsea players and the Dutch dredging community. New vehicles are being developed from Hungary to Hawaii, although Portugal, it seems, is at the forefront of new-vessel commercialization.Apart from dredging up gold and diamonds nearshore, underwater mining is about two activities: tapping the leftover mineral

Rio Doce rivermouth in the town of Regência weeks after the Samarco dam collapse image (Creative Commons - Arnau Aregio)

Toxic Mud from Dam Collapse Affects Coral

As Brazil deals with the effects of the recent Brumadinho dam collapse, which spilled around 12 million cubic meters of ore tailings and mining waste over the Vale do Rio Doce mining company´s administrative area, cafeteria and nearby towns – causing 179 deaths and the disappearance of 131 persons, at present count – before continuing on to contaminate rivers, the effects of the 2015 Fundão dam collapse are being felt on corals surrounding pristine offshore islands that form a unique environmental protection area and an important national park.After the Fundão dam

Photo: COVE

COVE Welcomes Aboard IBM Canada

.”IBM has a unique approach to collaboration that provides academic researchers, small and large business, start-ups and developers with business strategies and computing tools they need to innovate. Other areas of focus for IBM Canada include health, agile computing, water, energy, cities, mining, advanced manufacturing, digital media and cyber security

(Photo: NOC)

Exploring Deep-seafloor Mineral Deposits

A new project funded by the Natural Environmental Research Council (NERC), and led by Professor Bramley Murton at the National Oceanography Center (NOC), will aim to reduce the potential environmental impact of future subsea mining by making exploration for deep-seafloor mineral deposits much more effective.Many deep-seafloor mineral deposits, which can provide vital new metals for emerging technologies, including those that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions, were formed by hot springs on the seafloor. The big question facing geologists is whether these deposits – the vast majority of which

(Photo: iXblue)

IUEM Chooses iXblue Equipment

environmental temperature, pressure, sound velocity and inclinometer sensors. Low power consumption (up to four years of battery life in listening mode) and intelligent ping management feature make Canopus suited for subsea operations such as seafloor Geodesy, subsea monitoring, construction or subsea mining.“We needed a highly accurate and reliable system able to provide precise measurements over many years,” said Jean-Yves Royer, in charge of the project at the IUEM. “The autonomy provided by the Canopus transponder, along with its ease-of-use and the availability of the iXblue teams

Photo courtesy of Damen

Shipbuilding: Damen TSHD for Portuguese Dredging Company

Recently the Jose Duarte started its first mining job in Lisbon. The trailing suction hopper dredger has been built in Portugal for a Portuguese dredging company, to a Spanish design and using Dutch dredging equipment. The European cooperation has resulted in a customized dredger performing above expectations on her first job.Portugal has a long coastline and a number of busy navigable rivers – an excellent backdrop for the dredging company Inersel. When Inersel required an addition to its fleet, its preference was to acquire it within its home country. As a result, the company formed a team

Resourceful: Norwegian AUV and oceanographic researchers work in sync. Photo Credit: Professor Martin Ludvigsen, NTNU AMOS

The “Disruption” in AUV Trends

research communities of necessity do. Some are part of a European AUV research program called SWARMS.SWARMS is about “smart networked underwater robots cooperating in meshes”, and while it implies the “biomimicry” of bees, it has at least one unusual market in mind: future ocean mining. The disruptive element seems to be the network itself, a way to tie-in ROVs and other vessels.There’s a US Navy swarm program, of course, and it seems to use AI to mimic underwater what the Navy’s LOCUST program does with aerial drones. Yes, it’s advanced, but Chinese AI guru Kai-Fu

Marine Technology Reporter published a supplement to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Oceanology International. Photo: MTR

Oi: Tracking 50 Years of Ocean Innovation

and hydronautical world, the excitement that had been building over the past decade about what exploration of the deep could offer, through the likes of Jacques Cousteau, was starting to be applied in a new industry, North Sea oil and gas exploration. The possibilities of new industries such as deepsea mining and seafloor habitation were also being discussed.Mid-century saw the first gas discovery in the North Sea, followed, a year later, in 1966, by the founding of the Society of Underwater Technology. An industry was born. Just three years later, so was Oceanology. Donald Brooks, of BPS Exhibitions

Marine Technology Magazine Cover Jun 2019 - Hydrographic Survey: Single & Multibeam Sonar

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