Mississippi News

Gulf Coast Coastal Restoration Work Awarded

Great Lakes Dredge & Dock Corporation, provider of dredging, environmental and remediation services, has received an $88 million award for Phase I of the Mississippi Coastal Improvements Program (MsCIP) Comprehensive Barrier Island Restoration.   MsCIP was initiated in 2005 in the aftermath of the damage and destruction caused by Hurricane Katrina, and addresses hurricane and storm damage reduction, salt water intrusion, shoreline erosion and fish and wildlife preservation.  Ship Island is part of the Gulf Islands National Seashore and currently exists as two island segments

Mississippi Dept. of Marine Resources Purchases Triggerfish T4H ROV

The Mississippi Department of Marine Resources based out of Biloxi, Miss., purchased a fully loaded Remotely Operate Vehicle (ROV) from DOE, Inc. (formerly Deep Ocean Engineering) in November 2012. The Triggerfish T4H ROV is a redesign of one of the most popular ROV’s ever made, Deep Ocean’s Phantom HD2. The Triggerfish T4H consists of four brushed thrusters that provide 42 lbs of forward thrust and two “vertrans” thrusters that provide 24 lbs of vertical and lateral thrust with a DOE camera on a 180° tilting mount.  In addition to the base vehicle configuration

U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Polar Star, a heavy icebreaker homeported in Seattle, Washington, rests in the ice as the motor vessel Ocean Giant departs from the National Science Foundation’s McMurdo Station, Feb. 1, 2017. One of the primary responsibilities of the Polar Star’s crew is to provide an escort for the Ocean Giant through the frozen Ross Sea off of Antarctica. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Chief Petty Officer David Mosley)

USCG Awards Polar Icebreaker Contracts

Wednesday. The contracts were awarded to the following recipients: Bollinger Shipyards, LLC, Lockport, Louisiana; Fincantieri Marine Group, LLC, Washington, District of Columbia; General Dynamics/National Steel and Shipbuilding Company, San Diego, California; Huntington Ingalls, Inc., Pascagoula, Mississippi; and VT Halter Marine, Inc., Pascagoula, Mississippi. The combined total value of the awards is approximately $20 million.    The objective of the studies are to identify design and systems approaches to reduce acquisition cost and production timelines. In addition to a requirement

Large Dead Zone Found in Gulf of Mexico

taken during the 30th annual hypoxia survey cruise from July 27 to August 2. This area falls within the predicted range of 4,633 to 5,708 square miles forecast by a suite of NOAA-sponsored models, and confirms the accuracy of the models and their utility for guiding management of nutrients in the Mississippi River watershed.   The size is smaller than the 5,840 square miles recorded last year, but still greater than the Mississippi River/Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient (Hypoxia) Task Force target of less than 1,900 square miles--meaning nutrients from the Mississippi River watershed are

Photo: NOAA

Scientists Predict Third Largest GoM ‘Dead Zone’

due mainly to heavy May stream flows, which were about 34 percent above the long-term average and carried higher-than-average nutrient loads. The USGS estimates that 165,000 metric tons of nitrate – about 2,800 train cars of fertilizer – and 22,600 metric tons of phosphorus flowed down the Mississippi and Atchafalaya rivers into the Gulf of Mexico in May.   The USGS operates more than 3,000 real-time stream gauges, 60 real-time nitrate sensors, and tracks trends in nutrient loads and concentrations throughout the Mississippi-Atchafalaya watershed, which drains parts or all of 31 states

(Image: NOAA)

GoM Dead Zone is the Largest on Record

roughly as large as New Jersey.   The annual forecast, generated from a suite of NOAA-sponsored models, is based on nutrient runoff data from the U.S. Geological Survey. Both NOAA’s June forecast, which predicted a measured size of 8,185 square miles, and the actual size show the role of Mississippi River nutrient runoff in determining the size of the dead zone.    This large dead zone size shows that nutrient pollution, primarily from agriculture and developed land runoff in the Mississippi River watershed is continuing to affect the nation’s coastal resources and habitats

A variety of deltas: the Mississippi birdfoot delta (left) and Mexico's Grijalva cuspate delta (right). (Image: NASA Landsat)

Researchers Predict Shape of River Deltas

Predicting the shape of river deltas around the world; new method may help engineers determine coastal impact of dams and levees.   The Mississippi River delta is a rich ecosystem of barrier islands, estuaries, and wetlands that’s home to a diverse mix of wildlife — as well as more than 2 million people. Over the past few decades, the shape of the delta has changed significantly, as ocean waves have carved away at the coastline, submerging and shrinking habitats.   To keep flooding at bay, engineers have erected dams and levees along the river. However, it’s unclear how

Map showing distribution of bottom-water dissolved oxygen from July 28 to August 3, west of the Mississippi River delta. Black lined areas — areas in red to deep red — have very little dissolved oxygen. (Data: Nancy Rabalais, LUMCON; R Eugene Turner, LSU. Credit: NOAA)

NOAA: Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone ‘Above Average’

found this year’s Gulf of Mexico dead zone — an area of low to no oxygen that can kill fish and marine life — is, at 6,474 square miles, above average in size and larger than forecast by NOAA in June. The larger than expected forecast was caused by heavy June rains throughout the Mississippi River watershed.   The measured size this year — an area about the size of Connecticut and Rhode Island combined — is larger than the 5,052 square miles measured last year, indicating that nutrients from the Mississippi River watershed are continuing to affect the nation&rsquo

Photo: USGS

Sensors Track Gulf of Mexico's Nitrate Pulse

A new U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) report describes how advanced optical sensor technology is being used in the Mississippi River basin to accurately track the nitrate pulse to the Gulf of Mexico. Excessive springtime nitrate runoff from agricultural land and other sources in the Mississippi drainage flows into the Mississippi River and downstream to the Gulf of Mexico. This excess nitrate contributes to the Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone, an area with low oxygen known commonly as the "dead zone." NOAA-supported researchers reported that the summer 2014 dead zone covered about 5,052 square

(Photo: NOAA)

How Many Red Snapper Are in the Gulf of Mexico?

2016, Congress directed the National Sea Grant College Program and NOAA Fisheries to fund independent red snapper data collections, surveys and assessments, including the use of tagging and advanced sampling technologies. Sea Grant and NOAA Fisheries worked collaboratively to transfer federal funds to Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant offsite link to administer the competitive research grant process and manage this independent abundance estimate.   To conduct the independent study, a research team of 21 scientists from 12 institutions of higher learning, a state agency and a federal agency was selected

File photo: NOAA Ship Fairweather underway in Alaska (Photo: NOAA)

NOAA Releases 2018 Hydrographic Survey Plans

in some areas, lesser coverage.   Channel Islands and Vicinity, Calif. – This survey project provides data for crucial nautical chart updates and also generates backscatter data used in habitat mapping in the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary.   Gulf of Mexico and Mississippi River Chandeleur, La. – This survey area includes active oil and gas exploration areas and future state-leasing waters and is also shoaler than 20 fathoms throughout. This survey will identify hazards and changes in bathymetry.   Mississippi River, La. – The ports

What:	Hydrologist Measuring Streamflow When:	4/11/2014 Where: 	Smelterville, ID, USA  Details:	USGS hydrologist Greg Clark measures streamflow on Government Gulch Creek, a tributarty to the Coeur d’Alene River in northern Idaho. Streamflow data collected are included in the Coeur d’Alene Basin Environmental Monitoring Program the USGS conducts in cooperation with the Environmental Protection Agency.  Credit: U.S. Geological Survey  Department of the Interior/USGS U.S. Geological Survey/photo: De

Shallow Water Monitoring Sensors Track GOM Nitrate Pulse

A new U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) report describes how advanced optical sensor technology is being used in the Mississippi River basin to accurately track the nitrate pulse to the Gulf of Mexico. Excessive springtime nitrate runoff from agricultural land and other sources in the Mississippi drainage flows into the Mississippi River and downstream to the Gulf of Mexico. This excess nitrate contributes to the Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone, an area with low oxygen known commonly as the “dead zone.” NOAA-supported researchers reported that the summer 2014 dead zone covered about 5,052 square

(Photo: ASV Global)

ASV Global to Supply USV to University of Southern Mississippi

The University of Southern Mississippi (USM) has awarded a contract to ASV Global for the provision of a C-Worker 5 Unmanned Surface Vehicle (USV). The 18’ USV will be used for testing, training, and establishing procedures and protocols for use of the system by NOAA on future hydrographic programs.    Monty Graham, Director of USM’s School of Ocean Science and Technology (SOST), said, “The C-Worker 5 from ASV Global will be a great addition to support USM’s growing capabilities in Unmanned Marine Systems Certification and our research toward improved mapping and

Kenneth Graham (Photo: NOAA)

NOAA Taps Graham to Lead National Hurricane Center

Rouge office since 2008. He notably established two command centers in the wake of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010 that provided forecasts to help authorities make critical decisions in the five months following the spill. Graham also led the effort to support decision-makers in Louisiana and Mississippi with services focused on expected impacts for hurricanes Gustav, Ike, Isaac, and during the historic 2017 season.   Prior to leading the New Orleans/Baton Rouge forecast office, Graham served as the systems operations division chief at National Weather Service Southern Region headquarters

STEM: SeaPerch Underwater Robotic Championships

U. of Southern Mississippi site for Fourth National SeaPerch Challenge  – Underwater Robotic Championships – Excitement continues to build for the Fourth Annual National SeaPerch Challenge, as 2014 will see the largest group of SeaPerch competitors ever to assemble and compete for the title of National Champion. Hosted by the Mississippi Regional SeaPerch Committee, this year’s national competition will be held at the University of Southern Mississippi (Southern Miss) in Hattiesburg, MS, on Saturday May 17, 2014. Here, more than 100 middle and high school teams from all

Low Water Mississippi: USACE Outlines Action Plans

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Mississippi Valley Division Commander discusses Corps' plans with state & local representatives. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Mississippi Valley Division Commander Maj. Gen. John Peabody and St. Louis District Commander Col. Chris Hall met with state and local representatives yesterday in Alton, Ill., to discuss current and future actions the Corps will take to maintain a safe and reliable navigation channel during low water. The meeting, which was led by Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.), was also attended by Capt. Byron Black, U.S. Coast Guard commander of the

Photo: Jumbo

Shell Awards Deepwater Installation Contract in GOM

In another sign that activity in the moribund offshore sector is starting to loosen, Jumbo said that it has won the installation contract for the Shell deep-water Vito development in the US Gulf of Mexico.    The Vito development is located in the Mississippi Canyon, approximately 150 miles south of New Orleans in water depth of more than 4,000 feet.   Jumbo’s installation contract involves the initial pre-lay of the mooring system as well as the subsequent tow and hook-up of the FPS. Roddy Lafontaine, VP Offshore for Jumbo says:   "The Jumbo Offshore team is very

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