Mississippi News

Large Dead Zone Found in Gulf of Mexico

taken during the 30th annual hypoxia survey cruise from July 27 to August 2. This area falls within the predicted range of 4,633 to 5,708 square miles forecast by a suite of NOAA-sponsored models, and confirms the accuracy of the models and their utility for guiding management of nutrients in the Mississippi River watershed.   The size is smaller than the 5,840 square miles recorded last year, but still greater than the Mississippi River/Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient (Hypoxia) Task Force target of less than 1,900 square miles--meaning nutrients from the Mississippi River watershed are

What:	Hydrologist Measuring Streamflow When:	4/11/2014 Where: 	Smelterville, ID, USA  Details:	USGS hydrologist Greg Clark measures streamflow on Government Gulch Creek, a tributarty to the Coeur d’Alene River in northern Idaho. Streamflow data collected are included in the Coeur d’Alene Basin Environmental Monitoring Program the USGS conducts in cooperation with the Environmental Protection Agency.  Credit: U.S. Geological Survey  Department of the Interior/USGS U.S. Geological Survey/photo: De

Shallow Water Monitoring Sensors Track GOM Nitrate Pulse

A new U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) report describes how advanced optical sensor technology is being used in the Mississippi River basin to accurately track the nitrate pulse to the Gulf of Mexico. Excessive springtime nitrate runoff from agricultural land and other sources in the Mississippi drainage flows into the Mississippi River and downstream to the Gulf of Mexico. This excess nitrate contributes to the Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone, an area with low oxygen known commonly as the “dead zone.” NOAA-supported researchers reported that the summer 2014 dead zone covered about 5,052 square

Photo: USGS

Sensors Track Gulf of Mexico's Nitrate Pulse

A new U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) report describes how advanced optical sensor technology is being used in the Mississippi River basin to accurately track the nitrate pulse to the Gulf of Mexico. Excessive springtime nitrate runoff from agricultural land and other sources in the Mississippi drainage flows into the Mississippi River and downstream to the Gulf of Mexico. This excess nitrate contributes to the Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone, an area with low oxygen known commonly as the "dead zone." NOAA-supported researchers reported that the summer 2014 dead zone covered about 5,052 square

Low Water Mississippi: USACE Outlines Action Plans

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Mississippi Valley Division Commander discusses Corps' plans with state & local representatives. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Mississippi Valley Division Commander Maj. Gen. John Peabody and St. Louis District Commander Col. Chris Hall met with state and local representatives yesterday in Alton, Ill., to discuss current and future actions the Corps will take to maintain a safe and reliable navigation channel during low water. The meeting, which was led by Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.), was also attended by Capt. Byron Black, U.S. Coast Guard commander of the

Map showing distribution of bottom-water dissolved oxygen from July 28 to August 3, west of the Mississippi River delta. Black lined areas — areas in red to deep red — have very little dissolved oxygen. (Data: Nancy Rabalais, LUMCON; R Eugene Turner, LSU. Credit: NOAA)

NOAA: Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone ‘Above Average’

found this year’s Gulf of Mexico dead zone — an area of low to no oxygen that can kill fish and marine life — is, at 6,474 square miles, above average in size and larger than forecast by NOAA in June. The larger than expected forecast was caused by heavy June rains throughout the Mississippi River watershed.   The measured size this year — an area about the size of Connecticut and Rhode Island combined — is larger than the 5,052 square miles measured last year, indicating that nutrients from the Mississippi River watershed are continuing to affect the nation&rsquo

Mississippi Dept. of Marine Resources Purchases Triggerfish T4H ROV

The Mississippi Department of Marine Resources based out of Biloxi, Miss., purchased a fully loaded Remotely Operate Vehicle (ROV) from DOE, Inc. (formerly Deep Ocean Engineering) in November 2012. The Triggerfish T4H ROV is a redesign of one of the most popular ROV’s ever made, Deep Ocean’s Phantom HD2. The Triggerfish T4H consists of four brushed thrusters that provide 42 lbs of forward thrust and two “vertrans” thrusters that provide 24 lbs of vertical and lateral thrust with a DOE camera on a 180° tilting mount.  In addition to the base vehicle configuration

McDermott Signs Agreement for Gulfport Spoolbase

McDermott International, Inc. (NYSE: MDR) said that one of its subsidiaries has signed a lease agreement with the Mississippi Development Authority and the Mississippi State Port Authority for the exclusive right to operate a spoolbase and marine operations base in the Port of Gulfport. McDermott expects the facility, designed to serve projects from the Gulf of Mexico, will be available in early 2016. The new facility in Gulfport, located on the Mississippi coastline, will be used to fabricate steel pipe stalklines through advanced welding processes for use in offshore Reeled pipelay operations.

Aerial view of Louisiana shoreline (Photo: NOAA)

Gulf Oil Spill Restoration Projects Proposed

, Alabama ($8,050,000) Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge Trail Enhancement – Alabama ($545,110) Seagrass Recovery at Gulf Islands National Seashore – Florida District ($136,700) Bike and Pedestrian Use Enhancements at Davis Bayou, Gulf Islands National Seashore – Mississippi District ($6,967,000) Restoring Living Shorelines and Reefs in Mississippi Estuaries – coastal Mississippi ($30,000,000) Texas Bird Rookery Islands– Galveston Bay and East Matagorda Bay, Texas ($20,603,770) Sea Turtle Early Restoration – Gulf of Mexico ($45,000

STEM: SeaPerch Underwater Robotic Championships

U. of Southern Mississippi site for Fourth National SeaPerch Challenge  – Underwater Robotic Championships – Excitement continues to build for the Fourth Annual National SeaPerch Challenge, as 2014 will see the largest group of SeaPerch competitors ever to assemble and compete for the title of National Champion. Hosted by the Mississippi Regional SeaPerch Committee, this year’s national competition will be held at the University of Southern Mississippi (Southern Miss) in Hattiesburg, MS, on Saturday May 17, 2014. Here, more than 100 middle and high school teams from all

Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus delivers remarks during the christening ceremony for the future USS Jackson (LCS-6). During his speech, Mabus spoke about the littoral combat ship's capabilities as well as its namesake. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Arif Patani/Released)

SECNAV Mabus Delivers Keynote at Jackson Christening

Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus delivered the keynote address at the christening ceremony of the future USS Jackson (LCS 6) March 22 at Austal in Mobile, Ala. Dr. Katherine Holmes Cochran, daughter of Mississippi Sen. Thad Cochran, sponsors Jackson, the third Austal-constructed littoral combat ship to be christened. "Kate now becomes an honorary member of the Jackson's first crew," said Mabus. "She will maintain a special relationship with this ship and her Sailors, a special relationship that will be shared by the city of Jackson and her people, and by all the people of Mississippi

BOEM Public Meetings on Gulf Central Planning Area

The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) is preparing a supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for proposed Central Planning Area (CPA) lease sales beginning with Lease Sale 235 in the Gulf of Mexico off the states of Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana. Sale 235 is scheduled to be held in 2015. The study will also cover CPA lease sales 241 and 247, to be held in 2016 and 2017 respectively. The supplemental EIS will update the environmental and socioeconomic analyses completed in July 2012 and in April 2013. The supplemental EIS will consider possible new circumstances and information

A variety of deltas: the Mississippi birdfoot delta (left) and Mexico's Grijalva cuspate delta (right). (Image: NASA Landsat)

Researchers Predict Shape of River Deltas

Predicting the shape of river deltas around the world; new method may help engineers determine coastal impact of dams and levees.   The Mississippi River delta is a rich ecosystem of barrier islands, estuaries, and wetlands that’s home to a diverse mix of wildlife — as well as more than 2 million people. Over the past few decades, the shape of the delta has changed significantly, as ocean waves have carved away at the coastline, submerging and shrinking habitats.   To keep flooding at bay, engineers have erected dams and levees along the river. However, it’s unclear how

An artist rendering of the littoral combat ship USS Jackson (LCS 6). (U.S. Navy photo illustration by Jay M. Chu/Released)

Navy to Christen LCS Jackson

principal address at the ceremony, and Dr. Katherine Holmes Cochran will serve as the ship's sponsor. Cochran is the daughter of U.S. Sen. Thad Cochran. "Every ship we christen is important, but LCS 6, the future USS Jackson, has a special place in my heart," said Mabus. "As a native Mississippian, it is especially meaningful to me that, at this christening, we are able to celebrate the great state of Mississippi, the great city of Jackson, and, above all, the hard work and dedication of countless shipbuilders and others who have worked so diligently to construct this great warship."

Blake (Photo courtesy of David Evans and Associates)

DEA’s New 82-foot Survey Vessel Commissioned

David Evans and Associates, Inc.’s Marine Services Division commissioned its new 82-foot hydrographic survey and scientific vessel Blake in a ceremony held in the vessel’s homeport of Gulfport, Mississippi. At the ceremony, U.S. Senator Thad Cochran of Mississippi broke a Champagne bottle across the Blake’s bow. In addition to remarks by the Senator, Rear Admiral Gerd Glang, the director of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Office of Coast Survey and the U.S. National Hydrographer, and Mayor of Gulfport William Gardner Hewes spoke to attendees. The

Technip H.O.

Technip Awarded Subsea Contract in the Gulf of Mexico

  Technip was awarded by Deep Gulf Energy II LLC a lump sum contract for the development of the Kodiak field, located in Mississippi Canyon Blocks 727 and 771, in the Gulf of Mexico, at water depths ranging from 1,472 meters to 1,710 meters. The project consists of a subsea tie-back to the Devils Tower Truss Spar located in Mississippi Canyon Block 773. To withstand Kodiak field’s high temperature and pressure as well as extremely corrosive production fluids, the pipeline will be of a bi-metallic construction, lined with corrosion resistant alloy(1). This solution effectively addresses

SBM Offshore Announces Thunder Hawk Tiebacks

quarter 2016 respectively.  At these levels both fields will utilize a maximum of 85% of total daily asset capacity, and brownfield construction to upgrade the facility will be handled by Noble Energy. The Big Bend field is 18 miles from the Thunder Hawk platform in 7,200 feet of water in Mississippi Canyon Block 698.  Noble Energy operates a 54% working interest in Big Bend alongside W&T Energy VI, LLC with 20%, (a wholly owned subsidiary of W&T Offshore Inc.), Red Willow Offshore, LLC with 15.4% and Houston Energy Deepwater Ventures V, LLC with 10.6%. The Dantzler field is

BOEM Issues a Notice of Intent to Prepare EIS

part of the scoping process, BOEM's public scoping meetings will be held at the following places and times: Mobile, Alabama: Tuesday, September 1, 2015, Hilton Garden Inn Mobile West, 828 West I-65 Service Road South, Mobile, Alabama 36609, one meeting beginning at 4:00 p.m. CDT; Gulfport, Mississippi: Wednesday, September 2, 2015, Courtyard by Marriott, Gulfport Beachfront MS Hotel, 1600 East Beach Boulevard, Gulfport, Mississippi 39501, one meeting beginning at 6:00 p.m. CDT; and New Orleans, Louisiana: Thursday, September 3, 2015, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Gulf of Mexico OCS

Gulf Coast Coastal Restoration Work Awarded

Great Lakes Dredge & Dock Corporation, provider of dredging, environmental and remediation services, has received an $88 million award for Phase I of the Mississippi Coastal Improvements Program (MsCIP) Comprehensive Barrier Island Restoration.   MsCIP was initiated in 2005 in the aftermath of the damage and destruction caused by Hurricane Katrina, and addresses hurricane and storm damage reduction, salt water intrusion, shoreline erosion and fish and wildlife preservation.  Ship Island is part of the Gulf Islands National Seashore and currently exists as two island segments

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