National Oceanic And Atmospheric Administration News

A crowd gathers to hear speeches and presentations during the Advanced Naval Technology Exercise (ANTX) 2019 held on Aug. 29 at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Newport's Narragansett Bay Test Facility. ANTX 2019 demonstrates the future of Navy technologies in a low-risk environment before they become integrated in the fleet. This year's theme was Prepare For Battle: Undersea Superiority. (by Rich Allen, McLaughlin Research Corp.)

NUWC TECH Capabilities on Display at ANTX 2019

warfighter.”Pryor, Burnett and Hoffer also addressed the topic of strengthening bonds between government, industry and academia in their speeches. Burnett thanked Whitehouse in particular for helping pass the Commercial Engagement through Ocean Technology Act, which directs the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to coordinate with the private and academic sectors and the Navy on evaluating the at-sea data collection capabilities of unmanned maritime system technology and to integrate such technology into NOAA's observation suite.“How better to secure commercial technology

© Luna Vandoorne/Adobe Stock

Offshore Wind: Regulatory “Takes” – Take a Close Look

On April 30 the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) published a notice, requesting public comments, on a proposed “incidental harassment authorization” (IHA).  An IHA is a legal and enforceable document presenting the terms and conditions with which a company must adhere in order to protect wildlife.  In this case, the draft IHA was for Vineyard Wind, the wind energy company ready to start construction on an 800 MW offshore wind farm in the Atlantic, covering about 675 square kilometers, starting 14 miles from the coastline of Martha’s Vineyard.  This

© Alexander/Adobe Stock

July: Earth's Hottest Month Ever Recorded

According to the latest monthly climate report from the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), July 2019 was hottest month on record for the planet and Polar sea ice melted to record lows.Much of the planet sweltered in unprecedented heat in July, as temperatures soared to new heights in the hottest month ever recorded. The record warmth also shrank Arctic and Antarctic sea ice to historic lows.The average global temperature in July was 1.71 degrees F above the 20th-century average of 60.4 degrees, making it the hottest July in the 140-year record, according to scientists at

Crews aboard M/V SHELIA BORDELON offload more than 450,000 gallons of oil from the Coimbra shipwreck 30 miles offshore from Shinnecock, N.Y. U.S. Coast Guard responders discovered a significant amount of oil in cargo and fuel tanks during onsite assessments of the Coimbra in May 2019. (US Coast Guard photo by Michael Himes)

Oil Recovered from WWII Shipwreck

recoverable oil was removed and secured for disposal by Resolve Marine. “The amount remaining in the vessel is very small and any sheening poses minimal risk to the local environment and no risk to the shoreline.” said Steve Lehmann, senior scientific coordinator at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Any further potential environmental impact will be monitored by NOAA and the Coast Guard.The wreck will remain in place 30 miles offshore of Shinnecock, N.Y. “Each agency involved during the planning, assessment and recovery stages of the response played a critical role

The Coast Guardsmen at the National Data Buoy Center leverage more than 70 years of combined Aids to Navigation experience to maintain weather buoys on navigable waterways around the country. (U.S. Coast Guard file photo)

Buoy Data Helps Mariners to Weather Storms

,” said Pool, a retired Coast Guard officer from Shawnee, Oklahoma. Chad Pool is from a Coast Guard family. His wife Kelly Pool is a Coast Guard civilian and Coast Guard reservist and his son Zachary Pool is a Coast Guardsman at Station Sabine Pass, Texas.NDBC is part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Weather Service.The Coast Guard, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) have a shared responsibility for U.S. navigable waterways. NOAA produces nautical charts and provides weather information while the

Weddell Sea polynya, initally 3,700 square miles, 2017. False color NASA satellite image shows ice in blue, clouds in white. (Photo: Scripps Institution of Oceanography)

Robotic Data Help Explain Mysterious Holes

Research Fellowship (SURF) program at Scripps.SOCCOM is funded by the National Science Foundation. Campbell was supported by the Department of Defense through the National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate Fellowship program. Additional funding is from the NSF, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, UW,  and Scripps Oceanography.– Adapted from University of Washington 

Source: MarineTraffic.com

AIS Data: History & Future

of Engineers (USACE) focuses on AIS products for inland waterways.  The Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation (SLSDC) focuses on the St. Lawrence Seaway and associated waters.Numerous other federal agencies utilize AIS data in furtherance of their missions.  The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) utilizes AIS data to monitor and analyze fishing activity; improve marine mammal protection; and prioritize charting and surveying based on measured traffic volumes.  The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) uses AIS data to support its marine planning needs associated

GEOTRACES carousel deployment showing Cortland cable. Image: Cortland

Case Study: Cables in Underwater Missions

versions, hand-build for often unique purposes. Notably, Cortland has worked with the School of Marine Science and Technology at the University of Massachusetts to produce a specially designed electrical coaxial cable to conduct a census of Atlantic sea scallops, and with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to decrease deployment infrastructure and costs for tsunami warning buoys. Both projects needed cables which were not commercially available off the shelf to provide the protection, accuracy and durability required.Image: CortlandFor US GEOTRACES, a 14 mm Vectran cable was designed

Marine Technology Reporter published a supplement to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Oceanology International. Photo: MTR

Oi: Tracking 50 Years of Ocean Innovation

Despite the lack of success at these shows, for Carter, the experience meant meeting and working closely with Don Walsh, one of the few to have visited the depths of the Mariana Trench, alongside Jacques Piccard, and then U.S. Navy Oceanographer, and later Chief Scientist at the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Rick Spinrad.Ocean science has also continued to develop and expand. There have been improvements in ocean sensing – including how much data is being collecting, the quality of it and then what can be done with it through computer modelling. Jaeger highlights the developments

Study: Sunflower Sea Star Population in Peril

;For this research, “Disease Epidemic and a Marine Heat Wave Are Associated with the Continental-Scale Collapse of a Pivotal Predator (Pycnopodia Helianthoides),” the other partner institutions were Simon Fraser University, Stanford University, Hakai Institute and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).Between 2006 and 2017, scientists and trained citizen scientists with Reef Environmental Education Foundation (REEF) conducted 10,956 roving-diver surveys from Southern California to Alaska. Before 2013, divers reported an abundance of sea stars, but between 2013 to 2017

Marine Technology Magazine Cover Jul 2019 - MTR White Papers: Hydrographic

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