National Oceanography Center News

(Image: NOC)

Fast-moving Waterfalls in the Deep Sea

New research led by the National Oceanography Center (NOC) has discovered how fast-moving waterfalls under the sea control the shape and behavior of submarine channels. These underwater channels are the offshore equivalents of rivers, but can be much larger. Submarine channels can extend for tens to thousands of kilometers offshore, providing an important conduit for the transfer of sediment, nutrients and pollutants, such as microplastics, to the deep-sea. Avalanches of sediment that flow down these channels also pose a hazard to networks of seafloor cables that underpin global communications,

Gullick to Lead NOC's Business Development Strategy

.“This is a really exciting appointment that will enable NOC to move from being wholly reliant on traditional sources of mostly public sector research income and moving the emphasis from being reactive to being proactive in this area,” said Professor Ed Hill, Chief Executive of the National Oceanography Center. “Huw will play a key role in drawing on NOC’s scientific and technical expertise in a way which enables us to diversify our revenue streams into higher margin work than is normally available through our conventional funding sources”

Simplified graphic showing how seafloor currents create microplastics hotspots in the deep-sea. Image Courtesy NOCS

SCIENCE: Seafloor Microplastic Hotspots Controlled by Deep-sea Currents

ocean, but until now it has been unclear where it actually ended up.“Our study has shown how detailed studies of seafloor currents can help us to connect microplastic transport pathways in the deep-sea and find the ‘missing’ microplastics," said Dr. Mike Clare of the National Oceanography Center, who was a co-lead on the research. "The results highlight the need for policy interventions to limit the future flow of plastics into natural environments and minimize impacts on ocean ecosystems”.The lead author of the study, Dr. Ian Kane of the University of Manchester, said

Sonardyne International Ltd. and National Oceanography Centre staff completed the P3AUV trials at Loch Ness, Scotland, this week. (Photo: Sonardyne)

AUV Project Boosts Endurance, Navigation Capabilities

has delivered a step-change in unmanned platform endurance and navigational precision.The £1.4 million ($1.8 million) Precise Positioning for Persistent Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (P3AUV) project, led by subsea technology specialist Sonardyne International Ltd., with partners the National Oceanography Center (NOC) and L3Harris, and part funded by Innovate UK, has set new standards for long-endurance underwater navigation and automated subsea positioning of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV).In addition, the project also set out to increase the use of autonomy in offshore survey positioning

Photo Courtesy of National Oceanography Centre

#Oi2020 History

 In 2015, researchers at the National Oceanography Center (NOC) used Royal Navy submarine data to investigate the nature of turbulence in the ocean beneath the Arctic sea-ice. This is mainly because recent decreases in Arctic sea ice may have a big impact on the circulation, chemistry and biology of the Arctic Ocean, because of ice-free waters becoming more turbulent. By revealing more about how these turbulent motions distribute energy within the ocean, the findings from this study provide information important for accurate predictions of the future of the Arctic Ocean. The melting of Arctic

Image Courtesy: National Oceanography Centre (UK)

MTR100: National Oceanography Centre (UK)

National Oceanography Centre (UK)Southampton, UKPresident/CEO: Ed Hill OBENo. of Employees: 620www.noc.ac.ukThe National Oceanography Center (NOC) is the UK’s leading institution for integrated coastal and deep ocean research. NOC undertakes and facilitates world-class, agenda-setting scientific research to understand the global ocean by solving challenging multidisciplinary, large scale, long-term marine science problems to underpin international and UK public policy, business and wider societal outcomes. At the Marine Robotics Innovation Center in Southampton, the NOC hosts a community of 28

(L-R) Matt Kingsland, NOC and Paul Griffiths, Sonardyne, with the SPRINT-Nav 700 at the NOC robotics lab during Ocean Business (Photo: Sonardyne)

Sonardyne’s SPRINT-Nav 700 selected for new under-ice AUV

The UK’s center of excellence for oceanographic sciences, the National Oceanography Center (NOC), has selected high-performance hybrid navigation technology from Sonardyne International Ltd. for the next generation of its Autosub autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), targeted for under-ice operations.The NOC, based in Southampton, will incorporate Sonardyne’s highest performing SPRINT-Nav inertial navigation system (INS) into the new 2,000 meter depth-rated Autosub, which is being specifically developed for carrying high-performance sensors on the most demanding research missions under

Photo: L3 ASV

C-Enduro Delivered to Royal Navy

to be delivered by the MHC program,” said Alex du Pre, MHC Team Lead at Defense Equipment and Support.This project marks the fourth delivery of a C-Enduro vessel, and previous successful missions include an 11-day over-the-horizon marine science mission north of Scotland for the National Oceanography Center

Photo: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Waters West of Europe Drive Ocean Overturning

funding came from the U.S. National Science Foundation’s Physical Oceanography Program and the United Kingdom’s Natural Environment Research Council. Additional funding came from the European Union 7th Framework Program and Horizon 2020.Co-authors hailed from Duke; the U.K.’s National Oceanography Center; Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; the Scottish Association for Marine Sciences; the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research and Utrecht University; Memorial University in St. John’s, Canada; GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research in Kiel, Germany; and the Bedford Institute

Marine Technology Magazine Cover Jun 2020 -

Marine Technology Reporter is the world's largest audited subsea industry publication serving the offshore energy, subsea defense and scientific communities.

Subscribe
Marine Technology ENews subscription

Marine Technology ENews is the subsea industry's largest circulation and most authoritative ENews Service, delivered to your Email three times per week

Subscribe for MTR E-news