National Oceanography Center News

Sonardyne International Ltd. and National Oceanography Centre staff completed the P3AUV trials at Loch Ness, Scotland, this week. (Photo: Sonardyne)

AUV Project Boosts Endurance, Navigation Capabilities

has delivered a step-change in unmanned platform endurance and navigational precision.The £1.4 million ($1.8 million) Precise Positioning for Persistent Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (P3AUV) project, led by subsea technology specialist Sonardyne International Ltd., with partners the National Oceanography Center (NOC) and L3Harris, and part funded by Innovate UK, has set new standards for long-endurance underwater navigation and automated subsea positioning of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV).In addition, the project also set out to increase the use of autonomy in offshore survey positioning

Photo Courtesy of National Oceanography Centre

#Oi2020 History

 In 2015, researchers at the National Oceanography Center (NOC) used Royal Navy submarine data to investigate the nature of turbulence in the ocean beneath the Arctic sea-ice. This is mainly because recent decreases in Arctic sea ice may have a big impact on the circulation, chemistry and biology of the Arctic Ocean, because of ice-free waters becoming more turbulent. By revealing more about how these turbulent motions distribute energy within the ocean, the findings from this study provide information important for accurate predictions of the future of the Arctic Ocean. The melting of Arctic

Photo: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Waters West of Europe Drive Ocean Overturning

funding came from the U.S. National Science Foundation’s Physical Oceanography Program and the United Kingdom’s Natural Environment Research Council. Additional funding came from the European Union 7th Framework Program and Horizon 2020.Co-authors hailed from Duke; the U.K.’s National Oceanography Center; Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; the Scottish Association for Marine Sciences; the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research and Utrecht University; Memorial University in St. John’s, Canada; GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research in Kiel, Germany; and the Bedford Institute

Photo: L3 ASV

C-Enduro Delivered to Royal Navy

to be delivered by the MHC program,” said Alex du Pre, MHC Team Lead at Defense Equipment and Support.This project marks the fourth delivery of a C-Enduro vessel, and previous successful missions include an 11-day over-the-horizon marine science mission north of Scotland for the National Oceanography Center

(L-R) Matt Kingsland, NOC and Paul Griffiths, Sonardyne, with the SPRINT-Nav 700 at the NOC robotics lab during Ocean Business (Photo: Sonardyne)

Sonardyne’s SPRINT-Nav 700 selected for new under-ice AUV

The UK’s center of excellence for oceanographic sciences, the National Oceanography Center (NOC), has selected high-performance hybrid navigation technology from Sonardyne International Ltd. for the next generation of its Autosub autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), targeted for under-ice operations.The NOC, based in Southampton, will incorporate Sonardyne’s highest performing SPRINT-Nav inertial navigation system (INS) into the new 2,000 meter depth-rated Autosub, which is being specifically developed for carrying high-performance sensors on the most demanding research missions under

Image Courtesy: National Oceanography Centre (UK)

MTR100: National Oceanography Centre (UK)

National Oceanography Centre (UK)Southampton, UKPresident/CEO: Ed Hill OBENo. of Employees: 620www.noc.ac.ukThe National Oceanography Center (NOC) is the UK’s leading institution for integrated coastal and deep ocean research. NOC undertakes and facilitates world-class, agenda-setting scientific research to understand the global ocean by solving challenging multidisciplinary, large scale, long-term marine science problems to underpin international and UK public policy, business and wider societal outcomes. At the Marine Robotics Innovation Center in Southampton, the NOC hosts a community of 28

The frame and instruments as they were when they washed up. Photo: NOC

Lost @ Sea: Missing Equipment Washes Up Five Years Later

After going missing on Christmas Day five years ago, deep ocean measuring equipment belonging to the UK’s National Oceanography Center (NOC) has just been found on a beach in Tasmania by a local resident after making a 14,000 km journey across the ocean.In 2011, this deep-ocean lander instrument was deployed by NOC scientists in the northern Drake Passage, which is a narrow section of the ocean between South America and Antarctica. Measuring ocean bottom pressure here helps provide information on the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, which is the largest ocean current in the world. The instrument

(Photo: NOC)

Exploring Deep-seafloor Mineral Deposits

A new project funded by the Natural Environmental Research Council (NERC), and led by Professor Bramley Murton at the National Oceanography Center (NOC), will aim to reduce the potential environmental impact of future subsea mining by making exploration for deep-seafloor mineral deposits much more effective.Many deep-seafloor mineral deposits, which can provide vital new metals for emerging technologies, including those that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions, were formed by hot springs on the seafloor. The big question facing geologists is whether these deposits – the vast majority of which

Photo courtesy of Planet Ocean Ltd.

Royal Navy Supports Successful Trial of New Micro-Robots

ecoSUB, has been successfully trialed in the North Sea off Orkney during a marine robot demonstrator mission coordinated by the National Oceanography Center (NOC).ecoSUB is a new type of Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) developed by Planet Ocean in partnership with the NOC. The vehicles are around 0.5 meters in length and weigh only 4 kg, and are therefore classified as 'micro-AUVs'. Despite their small size, they are capable of diving to 500 m (2500m for ecoSUB-m25) and have sufficient battery power to stay underwater for several hours.Two of the new ecoSUB-µ5-SVP vehicles were

© Mykola Mazuryk / Adobe Stock

India Plans Deep Dive for Seabed Minerals

of organisms and creatures have evolved over millions of years, free of wild currents, sunlight, vibrations and noise which mining would bring, said Mahapatra, managing editor of the New Delhi-based science and environment magazine Down To Earth.According to a 2017 study by Britain's National Oceanography Center, mining experiments at seven sites in the Pacific Ocean showed the amount and diversity of marine life was reduced "often severely and for a long time".Sediment plumes and disturbance caused by mining could wipe out habitats for slow-growing corals and fish, Mahapatra said.It

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