Oil Spills News

The West Hercules drilling rig in the Barents Sea. (Photo: Ole Jørgen Bratland / Equinor)

Norway Awards Oil Permits to 11 Firms in Arctic Licensing Round

restrictions on drilling in two licences located near Bear Island, an important nesting ground of Arctic birds.Exploration drilling there will be banned between April 1 and August 15, the ministry said.Environmental groups have protested against oil exploration in Arctic waters citing the risk of oil spills.Greenpeace and other activists this year lost a lawsuit arguing that exploration in Norway's northernmost region is unconstitutional and should be banned as it violates the right to a clean environment. An appeal in the case is pending.Oil and gas production accounts for about 40 percent of

Suzanne Chang (Photo: BSEE)

Oil Spill Research to Measure Dispersant Effectiveness

optimistic about the detection methodology. The focus of BSEE-sponsored research is to encourage new and innovative ways to improve oil spill response capabilities from proof of concept through successive stages of technology development, maturity, and readiness for deployment during actual oil spills.  

Sahil Veeramoney (Photo: EPA)

EPA Awards 10th Grader for Work on Marine Oil Spills

Oregon 10th grader Sahil Veeramoney received the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10 President’s Environmental Youth Award for his development of a novel and efficient method to clean up marine oil spills.   Veeramoney, a student at Oregon Episcopal School in Portland, Oregon, developed a method to remediate marine oil spills after studying the environmental impact of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill that occurred in the Gulf of Mexico and subsequent oil spills. Veeramoney researched different cleanup methods with a goal to develop one that could be used efficiently

Photo: OSRL

Oil Spill Detection: Remote Sensing Equipment Tested

The latest in satellite, airborne and in-water surveillance and communications equipment were recently put to work off the coast of England for an exercise aiming to determine how remote sensing technologies can help identify and monitor oil spills at sea more effectively.   The exercise took place on June 13, 2017 in open sea off the southern coast of England, showcased through Oil Spill Response Ltd.’s (OSRL) Southampton-based Visualization Center, which provided a ‘Common Operating Picture’, integrating data from each of the technology partner’s equipment as well as

(U.S. Coast Guard photo by Stephen Lehmann)

Did Dispersants Help Responders Breathe Easier at Deepwater Horizon?

oil slicks on the surface, causing less oil to taint shoreline beaches and marshes. In a new study, we reveal a key benefit of using dispersants: the subsea dispersant injection likely allowed emergency responders literally to breathe easier.   Chemical dispersants have been applied to marine oil spills for at least a half century, but the debate recently has become more politicized and acrimonious. The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) warned about this in its 2005 study: Oil Spill Dispersants: Efficacy and Effects, predicting that “political issues” would become a factor influencing

Marine Technology Reporter - October 2017 Edition

mining: the promises of subsea riches pose a threat to subsea environments   Unmanned forces: building a multi-domain autonomous fleet   Aerial drones improve safety and performance offshore   The Arctic “Roomba”: new technologies for recovering oil spills in icy waters   Read more at http://digitalmagazines.marinelink.com/nwm/MarineTechnology/201710

Resilient-C (Image: MEOPAR)

New Tool Helps Boost Resilience to Coastal Hazards

by MEOPAR researchers aims to help BC communities improve resilience to coastal hazards   A team led by MEOPAR researcher Dr. Stephanie Chang recently launched Resilient-C, an online platform designed to connect communities facing similar coastal hazards – such as flooding, tsunamis and oil spills – so they can share knowledge and best practices, and improve coastal resilience.   The online tool serves 50 British Columbian communities, all situated along the coast of the Salish Sea. Chang, a professor at the University of British Columbia’s School of Community and Regional

(Photo: Sea-Bird Scientific_

MTR100: Sea-Bird Scientific

products are used across industries, all over the world in numerous critical environmental research and monitoring efforts, ranging from determining the ocean’s role in, and the associated impact from, climate changes to the monitoring of environmental impacts of major episodic events such as oil spills and tsunamis. Every Sea-Bird instrument is delivered fully calibrated. Its 28 CTD and DO calibration baths at our U.S. factory and at our European calibration lab ensure Sea-Bird instruments are the gold standard in research and operations. These automated calibration systems perform a combined

Photo: Ohmsett

MTR100: Ohmsett

203 meters long by 20 meters wide by 2.4 meters deep and is filled with 10 million liters of crystal clear saltwater. A crow’s nest is mounted on the main bridge 9.1 meters above the water, providing an excellent vantage point for mounting test equipment, such as sensors, to remotely detect oil spills, as well as for video documentation of a test. The facility is equipped with a computerized wave generator that is capable producing wave characteristics of 59 cm height (H1/3 at 7 meter wave length), 83 cm height (H1/3 Harbor Chop), and wave length up to 30 meters. Ohmsett’s testing capabiliti

MTR100: InterOcean Systems Inc.

in 1945, InterOcean Systems provides oceanographic sensors such as wave/tide and current meters, integrated data acquisition systems, acoustic releases for mooring deployment and recovery, cable handling winches for coastal or deep ocean survey, and pollution detection and control devices for reducing oil spills in the environment. In addition, InterOcean Systems also offers specialized design, engineering, and production for unique applications. The products developed and fabricated by InterOcean use proven and up-to-date technologies to meet customer requirements with durable, easy-to-use solutions that

(U.S. Coast Guard photo by Walter Shinn)

TechSurge: Advancing Oil Spill Research

The Marine Technology Society (MTS) and the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI) are collaborating on an upcoming TechSurge event in New Orleans on February 5, 2018 that will focus on the effects of oil spills on the environment and public health. Recent investigations have yielded research results and technological advancements that will improve future studies and impact modeling efforts. The goal of this meeting is to bring together the GoMRI and MTS communities, share research findings, and begin discussions of how the two communities might work together to better prepare for the next oil

© Michal / Adobe Stock

China Plans First Lab on Ocean Oil Spill Cleaning

China's Ministry of Transport is planning to establish a laboratory specialising in treating oil spills at sea, the first of its kind in the country, local media Science and Technology Daily reported on Sunday.   China is spending some 200 million yuan a year on researches for emergency treatment of oil spills but the technological expertise has not been widely applied because of lack of such a lab, the report said.   The laboratory is planned in northern port city of Tianjin, off the Bohai Bay, with an initial investment 400 million yuan ($63 million). The investment will go to research

Sanchi oil spill modeling - February 2018 (Image: NOC)

Sanchi Oil Spill Puts Coral Reefs at Risk

wreck were predicted to be affected, but these latest simulations point towards impacts on the Ryukyu Island chain to the south and west, with a small risk of contamination reaching the vicinity of Taiwan.   Leading this research, Dr. Katya Popova from the NOC said, “Contamination from oil spills can have a devastating effect on coastal communities and marine habitats, such as the coral reefs of Amami-Oshima. By reducing uncertainty around the fate of this oil contamination, our ocean modeling simulations have the potential to inform efforts to reduce further impacts from the spill. Furthermore

Image: Vesper Marine

AIS Marks Hazardous Reefs Following Oil Spills

Vesper Marine has been awarded the contract to provide Virtual Automatic Identification System (AIS) Beacons to mark seven reefs hazardous to shipping in the Bay of Plenty, as well as provide a coastal monitoring capability. The beacons will alert ships’ crews and the local government’s Regional Council that a vessel is heading towards a charted danger or entering the no-go zone around each hazard.   The contract is in response to the October 5, 2011 events that resulted in the worst environmental disaster in New Zealand’s history, when the container ship Rena struck Astrolabe

Deployment of the Remus 600 to join the rest of the fleet - 5 AUVs and 1 USV - to begin an unmanned multi-vehicle collaborative mission. (Photo courtesy: Javier Gilabert)

Expanded Underwater Robotics Ready for Oil Spills

, 7The Scottish Association for Marine Science - SAMS, 8Tallin University of Thechnology - TUT, 9University of Girona - UG, 10University of the Balearic Islands - UIB,  11Norges Teknisk-Naturvitenskatelige Universitet – NTNU, 12Marine Technology Unit CSIC.     Tracking in-water oil spills before reaching the surface by using new emerging robotic technologies is bridging the gap between existing traditional technologies (modelling and satellites) as decision support system for decision makers. Underwater oil plumes can come from bottom leaks or from surface patches forming subsurface

(Photo: OSIL)

OSIL: Oil Spill Monitoring Buoys Fuel International Interest

science exhibition Oceanology International.   The buoy systems are designed to integrate a real time noncontact hydrocarbon sensor in the high visibility top frame design, which is equipped with a pulsed UV LED beam and optical photo-detector with on-board software to enable the buoys to detect oil spills on water autonomously and immediately alert the users to any changes to protect vulnerable areas day and night, even under harsh weather conditions. The buoys can detect a variety of hydrocarbon based substances, and can be set up to ignore other materials that fluoresce in the same wavelength

© Arndt Vladimir / Adobe Stock

New Research to Examine Oil Spill Impacts

A research team led by University of South Florida College of Marine Science professor Dr. Steven Murawski has been awarded a $1 million grant to explore how oil spills, such as the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) in 2010, impact the economic, ecological and social system aspects of fishing communities.    The Gulf Research Program (GRP) of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine announced Thursday a total of $2.1 million in grants. Murawski’s team, which also includes Dr. Claire Paris, a bio-physical modeler from the University of Miami, and an environmental science

Marine Technology Magazine Cover Jun 2018 - Underwater Defense

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