University Of New Hampshire News

AUV control room: File photo

Hydroid Sponsors 2014 AUV Hydrographic Bootcamp

Hydroid, Inc., a subsidiary of Kongsberg Maritime and a leading manufacturer of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) says it is to sponsor the AUV Hydrographic Bootcamp, taking place August 3 - 8, 2014 at the University of New Hampshire’s Judd Gregg Marine Science Complex in New Castle, NH. The symposium will focus on developing new methods of AUV operations, data collection, processing and display. The intensive six-day course is by invitation only, and will teach participants about the operational methods of AUVs to collect bathymetric data for the purposes of nautical charting and the

Photo: HydroComp

HydroComp Adds Adam Kaplan as Project Engineer

development of new versions of PropExpert and PropCad software. He is also on the front-line of customer support to HydroComp’s worldwide users. Mr. Kaplan is not a new face to HydroComp; he started as engineering intern at HydroComp during his mechanical engineering studies at the University of New Hampshire College of Engineering and Physical Sciences where he earned both his B.S. and M.S. in Mechanical Engineering. A member of SNAME, he has made numerous presentations to the New England Section, the most recent on the topic of CAD-friendly propeller geometries. www.hydrocompinc.co

Hassler arrives at homeport: Photo credit NOAA

NOAA's 'Ferdinand R. Hassler' Begins Survey Project

Gulf coasts, Caribbean Sea and Great Lakes, acquiring data to update NOAA’s nautical charts. Her mission, however, is not limited to collecting bathymetry, explains retired NOAA Capt. Andy Armstrong, co-director of the Joint Hydrographic Center/Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping at the University of New Hampshire. Armstrong points out that “Hassler’s arrival is the impetus for improving the already dynamic synergies between NOAA’s hydrographic program and CCOM’s research.” Local government officials have provided a warm welcome to Hassler’s crew. Noting &ldquo

David Fratantoni, Chief Technology Officer

Horizon Marine Expands its Team

the world’s foremost physical oceanographers leading the development and growth of our operational ocean services.” Dave earned his B.S. in Ocean Engineering from Virginia Tech and a Ph.D. in Physical Oceanography from the University of Miami. A Magna Cum Laude graduate of the University of New Hampshire with a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, Ryan Carlson joins Horizon Marine as Technical Support Specialist. Ryan has a diverse background in electromechanical systems, data processing, mechanical modeling, and alternative energy. During two summer internship positions with Horizon Marine

Photo courtesy of NOAA

Tracking Atlantic Bluefin Tuna

in the north Atlantic. They nicknamed their aerial vehicle WASABI, for Water Imaging Aerial Surveying Automated Biological Instrument. She says, “We are doing this work in collaboration with NOAA’s Northeast Fisheries Science Center fisheries acoustics expert, Mike Jech, and University of New Hampshire Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping staff, sonar expert Tom Weber and aerial ocean mosaic mapping expert Yuri Rzhanov. It’s the result of a 20-year attempt to focus on developing direct assessment capability.”   And as usual for the LPRC, Lutcavage’s Gloucester-based

Rapaport Returns to OceanWise

Port-Log Environmental Data Sharing and Publishing services and Enterprise GIS Productivity software tools.   OceanWise has also added Will Girard to its Customer Service Team as a Business Administration Apprentice, as well as its second GEBCO sponsored intern, Azmi Rosedee from the University of New Hampshire. Rosedee will help update the company’s digital bathymetric database before returning to Malaysia as the new Data Manager in the Hydrographic Office of the Malaysian Navy.   Furthermore, the company’s first apprentice, George Wright, has commenced his BSc degree course

The Hydrographic Services Review Panel advises NOAA on improving services for navigation and coastal resilience. (Credit: NOAA)

New Lineup for NOAA Hydrographic Services Panel

, vessel pilotage, port administration, tides and currents, coastal zone management, geodesy, recreational boating, marine transportation and academia. Admiral Gerd F. Glang, director of the Office of Coast Survey, is the panel’s designated federal official. The directors of the NOAA/University of New Hampshire Joint Hydrographic Center, NOAA’s National Geodetic Survey, and NOAA’s Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services serve as nonvoting members. NOAA established the Hydrographic Services Review Panel in 2003 as directed by the Hydrographic Services Improvement

Image: AAM

New Research Vessel for University of New Hampshire

All American Marine, Inc. (AAM) has entered into a contract with the University of New Hampshire (UNH) for the design and construction of a new aluminum catamaran research vessel. AAM will build the 48’ x 17’ catamaran custom devised by Teknicraft Design, Ltd. of Auckland, New Zealand.   The new vessel, funded through a grant from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) will serve the Joint Hydrographic Center (JHC) at UNH. It will join UNH’s existing fleet and will complement capabilities by offering a highly complex multi-mission platform.   Larry

John Torgersen (Photo: Phoenix International Holdings, Inc.)

Torgersen Joins Phoenix International

ISO 9001:2008 certification to the new ISO 9001:2015 standard.   Torgersen comes to Phoenix with over 20 years of experience in Quality, Health, Safety & Environmental (QHSE) and regulatory affairs and is a retired Master Mariner (Unlimited Tonnage, Oceans). He is a graduate of Loyola University of New Orleans with a Master of Quality Management (MQM) and holds a Bachelor of Science undergraduate degree in Marine Transportation Management from the State University of New York. Additionally, he was honorably discharged from the U.S. Naval Reserve and has been a speaker/lecturer at numerous

TechSurge: Ocean Energy for non-Grid Connected Applications

, be it on islands that are supplementing expensive diesel power, in offshore arrays for oceanographic operations or for military operations in remote water side locations. Sponsored by Teledyne Marine, ODI, the event will begin with an onsite tour of the "Living Bridge" project at University of New Hampshire, and will include a welcome reception on November 2 followed by a full day technical program on November 3. The two day program on renewable ocean energy will feature 17 technical presentations on topics related to wave energy and tidal energy devices. There will be a user panel with

Rear Admiral (select) Shepard Smith (Photo: NOAA)

Smith Named Director of NOAA Coast Survey

Committee.  He served as the chairman of the IHO Data Quality Working Group.   Smith attended Deep Springs College and Cornell University, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering in 1993. He earned a Master's of Science in Ocean Engineering from the University of New Hampshire in 2003

Humpback with scraped nostril from bottom-feeding: Photo credit NOAA

Humpback Whales Feed in Different Ways Finds NOAA

, National Geographic Society's underwater video and audio recording system.   "By visualizing the data with TrackPlot, we can actually see how the whale moves underwater and this enables us to discover different kinds of foraging behaviors," said lead author Colin Ware of the University of New Hampshire's Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping. TrackPlot is a custom software tool for DTAG data that produces a ribbon-like image in three dimensions. "With these 3-D visualizations, we can follow the path of the whale from surface to seafloor along with all of the pitch, roll and heading

Photo of what seaweed community looks like after introduction of invasive seaweed (Dasysiphonia japonica) (Photo: Kristen Mello/UNH)

Sea Habitats Altered by More Invasive Seaweed-Study

Walking along the beaches of New England, it is easy to spot large amounts of a fine red seaweed clogging the coastline, the result of sweeping changes in the marine environment occurring beneath the water.   To further investigate, researchers at the University of New Hampshire looked at seaweed populations over the last 30 years in the Southwestern Gulf of Maine and found the once predominant and towering kelp seaweed beds are declining and more invasive, shrub-like species have taken their place, altering the look of the ocean floor and the base of the marine food chain.   In the study

Aquabotix Names Curley CDO

recently Curley was Director of Sales - Vehicles at Teledyne Marine, a division of Teledyne Technologies, Inc. Previously, he served as Regional Sales Manager at Teledyne TSS Ltd (UK) and Sales and Marketing Manager at EPC Laboratories, Inc.   Curley has a BA in Communications from the University of New Hampshire, Durham, N.H. 

ARGUS Enviable Technology, Unlimited Potential

to be identified), Rivercrest (classroom), Campbell Transportation, Consol Energy, and the Platypus unmanned surface vessel have all at one time or another had ARGUS equipment deployed on board. Beyond this, ARGUS has collaborated on one level or another with the port of Pittsburgh, NOAA, the University of New Hampshire and many others. Downstream Applications It is hoped that ARGUS eventually will be a primary tool in helping to prioritize dredging areas, surveys and could also substitute for a dredging schedule that may not reflect real needs. In a world where cruise lines increasingly go to places

(Image: University of Maine)

Floating Offshore Wind Turbine Design Passes ABS Review

The American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) has completed the design review of the Front End Engineering and Design (FEED) documentation for the VolturnUS, a floating offshore wind turbine (FOWT), developed by the University of Maine Advanced Structures and Composites Center.   “UMaine is pleased that its innovative design became the first floating wind turbine concrete semisubmersible hull to be reviewed by ABS, and found to meet the ABS requirements,” said Dr. Habib J. Dagher, P.E, UMaine Composites Center executive director and principal investigator.    “After 10

A battleship marks the point where HMS Hampshire sank 100 years ago and the tower that commemorates the lives lost can be seen on Marwick Head, Orkney. (Courtesy Keith Bichan, Roving Eye Enterprises.)

Sunken WWI Battleship HMS Hampshire Surveyed

Lord Kitchener and over 700 sailors died in the sinking of the warship HMS Hampshire after it hit a mine off the Orkney Isles.   Now 100 years later, a Saab Seaeye Falcon underwater robotic system operated by Roving Eye Enterprises examined the wreck in a collaborative project that includes the University of the Highlands and Islands Archaeology Institute, with licensed permission from the U.K. Ministry of Defense.   Sandra Henry, a marine archaeologist from the Institute said that the remote survey has provided many new insights into the sinking and wreck of the HMS Hampshire, adding that

Horizon Marine Adds Three New Hires

a MetOcean Analyst with a B.A. in Earth and Oceanographic Science from Bowdoin College. Drew’s physical and biological oceanographic research and experience is in data processing, numerical modeling and remote sensing.     Aaron Rosenberg received a B.S. in Marine Science from Boston University and dual M.S. in Environmental Engineering and Oceanography from the University of Connecticut. Aaron’s focus to date has been in air-sea interactions as they relate to storm surge forecasting, numerical modeling and ocean observations.   Michael Leber is a 2013 cum laude graduate

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