Center For Coastal News

Depredation—when seals and other marine animals prey on fish caught in net—can be costly both economically and ecologically. It can reduce the amount of sell-able fish, damage fishing gear, and lead to the lethal entanglement of seals and other protected marine mammals in fishing nets. (Illustration courtesy of Terra Dawson, dawsonillustrations.com)

Underwater Cameras Tackle Tough Questions for Fishery

can occur, leaving fishermen with ruined catches and damaged fishing gear, and seals with the possibility of lethal entanglements.To come up with new ways to prevent such interactions between marine animals and fisheries, ocean scientists at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and the Center for Coastal Studies (CCS) are working with local fishermen on Cape Cod to understand exactly what happens when seals and other marine mammals invade a fishing net to forage.“Fishermen are a great source of knowledge and a big part of the conservation equation here in New England, where the commercial

U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Lauren Steenson

#Oi2020: Subsea History

In 2003, Dr. Larry Mayer, director of the Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping (and his team at the center), worked closely with the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) to gain access to a platform capable of breaking and transiting through ice, while also supporting the scientific equipment needed to gather data on the extended continental shelf (ECS). The Coast Guard Cutter Healy was tasked with the job, and during Mayer’s first outing with the vessel that year he and his team discovered a 10,000-foot high seamount approximately 400 miles north of Barrow, Alaska, which they named the Healy Seamount.

ASV BEN (Bathymetric Explorer and Navigator) is a custom prototype built by SV Global Unmanned Marine System for University of New Hampshire’s Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping. ASV BEN has a state-of-the art seafloor mapping system that can map depths reaching 650 feet. (Photo: Ocean Exploration Trust)

Searching for Shipwrecks

such as sinkholes, fish habitats, and interesting geological formations.During the two-week expedition, researchers mapped areas within the sanctuary with a multibeam sonar system aboard autonomous surface vehicle ASV BEN (Bathymetric Explorer and Navigator) from University of New Hampshire’s Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping. BEN is a state-of-the-art robotic vehicle that looks like a small yellow boat. Unlike most boats, though, it doesn’t carry people; instead, it is piloted by crew members back on shore. Using sonar and GPS, BEN collects data about the lake bottom that can be used to

(Photo: GEBCO-NF Alumni)

Shell Ocean Discovery XPRIZE Winner Annouced

Dr Karolina Zwolak (Poland).The team’s entry into the competition was funded by The Nippon Foundation, a Japanese private non-profit organisation, and the prize money will be reinvested by foundation into the development of future ocean mapping initiatives.The team venture was based at the Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping / Joint Hydrographic Center (CCOM/JHC) at UNH. The Alumni worked closely with partners including the Sasakawa Peace Foundation, Hushcraft Ltd., Ocean Floor Geophysics Inc., Earth Analytic, Teledyne CARIS, Raitt Orr and Associates, ShipOwners, and OmniAccess, as well as equipment

© peteri/Adobe Stock

Scientist Pool Data to Create the $3B Ocean Map

in the field of ocean mapping it is no small irony that we know more about the surfaces of the Moon and Mars than we do about our planet's sea floor."Can you imagine operating on the land without a map, or doing anything without a map?" asked Larry Mayer, director of the U.S.-based Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping, a research body that trains hydrographers and develops tools for mapping."We depend on having that knowledge of what's around us - and the same is true for the ocean," he told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.With their deep craters and mountain ranges, the contours

(Image: Kongsberg)

Mapping the Future

Engineering. United StatesCFIS. SwitzerlandGEBCO-NF Alumni. United StatesKUROSHIO. JapanPISCES. PortugalTeam Tao. United KingdomTexas A&M University Ocean Engineering. United StatesVirginia DEEP-X. United StatesRochelle Wigley, Director of the Nippon Foundation / GEBCO training program at the Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping at the University of New HampshireWhy was GEBCO training program established?The Nippon Foundation / GEBCO training program was established in 2004 to address a number of points: It is the first program of its kind focused on Ocean Bathymetry and the skills required to do

The GEBCO-NF Alumni team concept sets sail from Horten, Norway, on the first of three 24-hour sea-trials. The team observed the successful round of tests from a guard vessel, seen here behind USV-Maxlimer. (Photo: GEBCO)

Competitor Preps for XPRIZE Final with 24-hour Sea Trial

for the XPRIZE final.“Our expanded team is a remarkable example of what can be achieved through international collaboration,” said Dr. Rochelle Wigley, Project Coordinator. “That so many of our team are alumni of The Nippon Foundation-GEBCO postgraduate training course at the Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping (University of New Hampshire), highlights what a valuable global resource this capacity-building program is. The team also benefits from the experience of academics from a range of fields including geology, geomorphology and geophysics, as well as surveyors from national hydrograph

BEN independently follows programmed lines (Photo: NOAA)

Autonomous Vehicle Maps the Arctic Seafloor

Far above the Arctic Circle, an autonomous surface vehicle set out to map the seafloor in an effort to improve nautical charts in areas where there is scarce data and vessel traffic is increasing.A team of engineers and students from the University of New Hampshire’s (UNH) Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping, together with personnel from NOAA’s Office of Coast Survey, recently returned from an Arctic voyage that deployed an unmanned surface vehicle (USV) from the NOAA hydrographic ship Fairweather, a first from a NOAA vessel in the region.The Fairweather spends each summer surveying the

File photo: NOAA Ship Fairweather underway in Alaska (Photo: NOAA)

NOAA Releases 2018 Hydrographic Survey Plans

changes to the bathymetry and resolve position uncertainty in known hazards.   Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, Fla. – This survey project provides updates to nautical charting products of the area and supports marine habitat research projects through the National Center for Coastal Ocean Science and the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries.   Atlantic Coast and Puerto Rico Approaches to Chesapeake Bay – This multi-year survey covers the approaches to Chesapeake Bay to support the safety of commerce and monitor the environmental health of the region

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