Delaware News

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Offshore Wind Could Bring In $1.7B to U.S. Treasury by 2022

U.S. could create 80,000 jobs annually from 2025 to 2035.Commissioned by four energy industry groups, American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), National Ocean Industries Association (NOIA), New York Offshore Wind Alliance (NYOWA), and the Special Initiative on Offshore Wind (SIOW) at the University of Delaware, the study dives into the economic impact of offshore wind activities as a result of potential Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) lease auctions in 2020, 2021 and 2022. Two million acresAccording to the press statement issued Tuesday, findings from the study confirm additional lease areas

Doug Copeland. Photo: Atlantic Shores

Atlantic Shores Launches Ocean Survey Ops

with these industries as we plan an Atlantic Shores offshore wind farm that works best for New Jersey.”A third-generation resident of Long Beach Island, Wark began his career operating commercial boats at the age of 17 and has worked extensively in the ocean research field for institutions such as Delaware State University and Rutgers University, including nearly a decade of sturgeon sampling. Last winter he helped consult on the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities (NJBPU) strategic plan for offshore wind.“The fisheries are vastly different than when I began my career, and changes in the ocean

A marine debris team member gathers a handful of disposable cigarette lighters picked up at a beach cleanup site. (NOAA)

NOAA: $2.7M for Marine Trash Studies

(Washington) and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The grantees will implement locally based, cost-effective activities to remove marine debris, including derelict fishing gear and abandoned and derelict vessels. Approximately $1.2 million will support four marine debris research projects in California, Delaware, New Jersey and Virginia. These projects address ecological risk assessment and the fate and transport of marine debris

ASV BEN (Bathymetric Explorer and Navigator) is a custom prototype built by SV Global Unmanned Marine System for University of New Hampshire’s Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping. ASV BEN has a state-of-the art seafloor mapping system that can map depths reaching 650 feet. (Photo: Ocean Exploration Trust)

Searching for Shipwrecks

, the expedition gave researchers and engineers the opportunity to test BEN’s telemetry range and refine its performance capabilities for future expeditions.Surveying in these waters can be challenging, but it can also be fruitful. In 2017, Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary, University of Delaware, and Michigan Technological University discovered and identified the wooden freighter Ohio, which suffered a fatal collision with the schooner Ironton in 1894. Ironton, which also sank after the collision, has yet to be found, and scientists were on the lookout during the expedition.In addition

© DedMityay / Adobe Stock

US Still Processing Atlantic Seismic Permits

an emailed statement on Monday.Five companies received a first round of permits last year when the fisheries office of the National Oceanic and Atmoshperic Administration issued permits that would allow for the incidental harassment of marine mammals with air gun blasts in a region of the Atlantic from Delaware to Cape Canaveral, Florida.The last time seismic surveys were completed in the Atlantic was in the 1980s. The Obama administration banned seismic testing permits there in 2016 after it removed the Atlantic coasts from drilling in its five-year OCS proposal.Gail Adams-Jackson, spokeswoman for the

Retrofit: new work in wind for an anchor-handling vessel. Illustration: courtesy Unitech

Offshore wind: The making of a (supply chain) star

Wind is “the tech of choice,” the International Energy Agency said recently, just as a new report by the University of Delaware outlined the opportunity in U.S. offshore wind: 5,000 miles of offshore cabling and 1,700 turbines, it turns out, are bundled into current state-side plans. Yet, serious observers of the first U.S. offshore wind installations saw inefficiency: unwieldy lifts; few specialist vessels on-hand; and cables were “just cables.” Supply chain innovation, people say, lags other industries.In Europe, where offshore turbines heavily dot maritime maps, there’s

(Photo: CGG)

Nine US States Seek to Stop Atlantic Seismic Testing

to comment.Last month the fisheries office of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, part of the Commerce Department, issued permits to WesternGeco LLC, a subsidiary of Schlumberger Ltd, and CGG to harass, but not kill, marine mammals with air gun blasts in a region of the Atlantic from Delaware to Cape Canaveral, Florida.Jennie Lyons, a spokeswoman at the fisheries office declined to comment on the lawsuit but said the department only authorized harrasment, not outight killing, of the marine animals in issuing the permits. A marine biologist at the office told reporters last month that

A dive team investigates sonar targets collected via the REMUS 100 AUV,  with RV Norseman II sailing in the background (Photo: NOAA)

US Destroyer Wreckage Discovered off Remote Alaskan Island

the ship, but for the families of the doomed Sailors, the final resting place of loved ones lost in the predawn hours of Aug. 18, 1943 remained unknown.On July 17, a NOAA-funded team of scientists from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and the University of Delaware discovered the missing 75- foot stern section in 290 feet of water off of Kiska, one the few United States territories to be occupied by foreign forces in the last 200 years.“This is a significant discovery that will shed light on this little-known episode in our history,” said retired

(Photo: NOAA)

Gulf of Mexico ‘Dead Zone’ Smaller than Usual

Scientists have determined that this year’s Gulf of Mexico “dead zone”— an area of low oxygen that can kill fish and marine life — is approximately 2,720 square miles (7,040 square kilometers), an area about the size of Delaware. This summer’s smaller-than-expected dead zone size is the fourth smallest area mapped since 1985 and is smaller than the 5,780 square miles forecast by NOAA in June.The effort to determine the size of the dead zone was led by NOAA-supported scientists at Louisiana State University and the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium during a

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