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Todd Carey (Photo: PCCI)

PCCI Hires Carey as Chief Engineer

PCCI, Inc. announce that Todd Carey has joined the company as a chief engineer based in Ventura, Calif. He will be responsible for providing engineering, design, installation and program/project management services to U.S. government and commercial clients in the ocean facility and offshore energy industries.Carey is a Mechanical Engineer with experience supporting U.S. Navy, and upstream oil and gas clients on the U.S. West Coast.  He has 18-years of experience in the analysis, design and installation of ship deployment systems, ocean facility installations, port security barriers, and submarine

© wildestanimal / Adobe Stock

Mediterranean Marine Life Flourishes During Lockdown

Marine life in the Mediterranean off Italy flourished during the coronavirus lockdown as water quality improved and species moved into spaces vacated by people and ships, the Italian coastguard has found.The strict rules halting business and movement for two months offered an unprecedented opportunity to monitor the impact of human activity on the sea that surrounds Italy.Since April, the coastguard has used water samples, underwater footage filmed by remotely operated vehicles and its own divers, and a census of unusual sightings of marine species close to heavily populated areas to monitor the sea.

 The JALBTCX team standing with COL. Thomas Asbery, Former District Commander, New York District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (far right), in front of their aircraft, at Long Island MacArthur Airport in Ronkonkoma, New York.  Credit:  USACE.

Army Corps' Data Driven to Improve Coastal Projects

In a hotel conference room on Long Island, New York, a team of experts are processing data and information on computers. Alongside them is a large display monitor screen that's projecting the information."It's a beautiful thing. On the screen they are able to observe the condition of New York's and New Jersey's coastlines almost in real-time," said Jeffrey Cusano, Geospatial Coordinator, New York District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.The team is the Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise.  Recently, Cusano and other members of the U.S. Army Corps

A striking image of Hollardia goslinei. This is a species of deep-water spike fish native to Hawaii. ROV footage of this species occurring in Australia puts it very far away from its known 'home' range. © Schmidt Ocean Institute

SOI: Amidst Pandemic, Seafloor Mapping Zooms Ahead

from their homes, collecting high-resolution seafloor maps and video footage of the ocean down to 1,600 meters. Led by chief scientist Dr. Robin Beaman of James Cook University, the expedition enabled the team to develop a better understanding of the physical and long-term changes of deep-sea reefs.The effort mapped more than 35,500 square kilometers of the seafloor, revealing 30 large coral atolls and banks, submarine canyons, dune fields, submerged reefs and landslides. Previously, only the shallower parts of these reefs had been mapped, and until now, no detailed mapping data existed of the deeper

Edda Sun - Credit: Neptune Energy

Fugro Inspecting Cygnus Subsea Structures

gas field in the UK’s southern North Sea.Under the contract awarded by oil and gas company Neptune Energy, Fugro will inspect subsea infrastructure including pipelines and umbilicals, spools and communication cables, and carry out standard structural surveys of the Neptune-operated Cygnus gas platform jackets.The giant gas development was brought online in late 2016 and consists of four platforms. Neptune operates Cygnus with 38.75% stake, with Spirit Energy owning 61.25%.Fugro will deploy Remotely Operated Vehicles from the Edda Sun vessel to carry out the inspection work. Data processors

Atlantic Shores Offshore Wind Installs Wind LiDAR in New Jersey

A wind LiDAR (light detection and ranging) instrument has been installed alongside the causeway leading to Rutgers University Marine Field Station in Tuckerton, New Jersey.The fully autonomous sensor platform, owned and operated by Atlantic Shores Offshore Wind, will provide observations of wind profiles up to several hundred feet in a location directly on the land/sea boundary.Atlantic Shores Offshore Wind, a joint venture between Shell and EDF, installed the LiDAR in collaboration with the Rutgers University Center for Ocean Observing Leadership (RUCOOL) and the Rutgers University Marine Field

Matt Green (Photo: Greensea)

Greensea Hires Green as Senior Robotics Engineer

Greensea, creator of OPENSEA, the open software architecture platform for the marine industry, recently added key personnel to its engineering team to support the development of its EOD technologies. Matt Green, Senior Robotics Engineer, is leading the technology development of Greensea’s EOD Workspace, a navigation, control, and user interface system for inspection class ROVs used  in military subsea EOD mitigation.“We wanted a robotics engineer who would push the boundaries of what a small ROV is capable of in the EOD world. These ROVs require highly accurate navigation and control

(Photo: Jack Rowley)

USVs: A Solution for Inspecting Dams and Guarding Waterways

Central Michigan this spring highlighted the dangers of aging infrastructure. As an op-ed in The New York Times, “Dam Failures Are a Warning,” suggested, “Two dams down, a few thousand to go.” It was not meant to be a sensational statement. Deteriorating infrastructure is an issue for most countries. Many nations have systems in place to evaluate and grade the state of their national infrastructure. In the United States, the nation’s civil engineers provide an assessment of the nation’s sixteen infrastructure categories using an A-to-F school report card format.Among

Metal debris – a food tin found at 4,947 meters (3.07 miles) depth in Sirena Canyon off the Mariana Islands. Image courtesy of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, 2016 Deepwater Exploration of the Marianas. (Photo: NOAA)

New Study Tracks Trash Found at the Ocean's Depths

While deep-ocean exploration is responsible for ground-breaking discoveries, it is also unmasking the true scale of our impacts in the deep ocean. Marine debris is a growing problem, and a new study has shown that even unexplored, remote and protected areas of the central and western Pacific deep ocean are not immune from our touch.Coordinated deepwater exploration from 2015 to 2017 via remotely operated vehicle expeditions conducted onboard NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer and the Schmidt Ocean Institute’s Research Vessel Falkor enabled new insights into the status of deep-sea marine debris. These

Marine Technology Magazine Cover Jun 2020 -

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