Great Barrier Reef News

The Riptide AUV (Credit BAE Systems)

Good Undersea Vehicles Come in Small Packages

approach to delivering an affordable solution for end users. The RangerBot was designed by engineers at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Brisbane, Australia. The team at QUT work in a robotics center focused on machine vision. They also work to support environmental assessments on the Great Barrier Reef. A key paradigm shift was enabled when the team, recognizing that water conditions in their target environment were very clear, chose to employ exclusively vision-based sensing.RangerBot over a reef (Credit Matthew Dunbabin/QUT) This perhaps sounds obvious but abandoning the size, power and

EOMAP showcased its contribution to the world-first 3D habitat map of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) at the International Forum on Satellite-Derived Bathymetry, SDB Day 2019 in Australia.

Making the Great Barrier Reef’s 3D Habitat Map

The mapping project, ‘3D live habitats for the full extent of the Great Barrier Reef,’ will provide maps of the predicted coral types and underwater landscape for the more than 3,000 reefs within the 350,000 sq. km of the GBR.EOMAP's technology provides essential data for this world-first project, in which the University of Queensland (UQ), Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, and the Australian Institute of Marine Science are partners.The resulting maps will be at an unprecedented 10m horizontal grid resolution and reveal bathymetry (water depth), geomorphic zones and bottom types

Photo courtesy of EOMAP

The Great Barrier Reef: 3D Habitat Map

International aquatic remote sensing company EOMAP will showcase its unique contribution to the world-first 3D habitat map of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) at the International Forum on Satellite-Derived Bathymetry, SDB Day 2019, next month in Australia.The mapping project, ‘3D live habitats for the full extent of the Great Barrier Reef’, will provide, for the first time, maps of the predicted coral types and underwater landscape for the more than 3,000 reefs within the 350,000 km2 of the GBR.EOMAP's cutting edge technology provides essential data for this revolutionary project, in

Photo: Ole Jørgen Bratland / Statoil

Arctic Oil 'Undrillable' amid Global Warming -UN's Ex-climate Chief

the Paris accord was reached by almost 200 nations in 2015, told Reuters by telephone "the Arctic has been rendered undrillable."The past three years have been the hottest since records began in the 19th century, and Figueres said the heat was a threat to everything from Australia's Great Barrier Reef to ice in Antarctica.The former Costa Rican diplomat who campaigns for a peak in global emissions by 2020 said it made no economic sense to explore in the Arctic, partly because it was likely to take years to develop any finds.Capital investment would be better used developing renewable energies

© Richard Whitcombe / Adobe Stock

Coral Reefs Get Sick from Plastic Waste -Study

Billions of bits of plastic waste are entangled in corals and sickening reefs from Thailand to Australia's Great Barrier Reef, scientists said on Thursday.   The trash is another pressure on corals, already suffering from over-fishing, rising temperatures caused by climate change and other pollution.   In the Asia-Pacific region a total of 11.1 billion plastic items - including shopping bags, fishing nets, even diapers and tea-bags - are ensnared on reefs, the scientists wrote in the journal Science.   They projected the numbers would rise by 40 percent by 2025 as marine pollution

© Larry Malvin / Adobe Stock

Scientists Alarmed by Starfish Eating Great Barrier Reef

A major outbreak of coral-eating crown of thorns starfish has been found munching Australia’s world heritage-listed Great Barrier Reef, scientists said on Friday, prompting the government to begin culling the spiky marine animals.   The predator starfish feeds on corals by spreading its stomach over them and using digestive enzymes to liquefy tissue, and the outbreak hits as the reef is still reeling from two consecutive years of major coral bleaching.   “Each starfish eats about its body diameter a night, and so over time that mounts up very significantly,” Hugh

© think4photop / Adobe Stock

Corals at Risk as Underwater Heat Waves Strike More Often

researchers wrote in the journal Science.   Climate change will "inevitably" make underwater heat waves and bleachings more frequent, they wrote.   The worst bleaching was in 2015-16, when record ocean temperatures affected 75 percent of 100 reefs studied from Australia's Great Barrier Reef to the Caribbean.   Lead author Professor Terry Hughes, director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies in Australia, urged more action to limit greenhouse gas emissions under the global 2015 Paris climate agreement.   The main problem for protecting reefs was

World Temperatures Hit New High in 2016

; Natural Disasters Among last year's extreme weather events, wildfires in Alberta were the costliest natural disaster in Canada's history while Phalodi in west India recorded a temperature of 51C (123.8°F) on May 19, a national record. North America also had its warmest year on record, the Great Barrier Reef off Australia suffered severe damage from rising temperatures, and sea ice in both the Arctic Ocean and around Antarctica is at record lows for mid-January. At a conference in Paris in late 2015, governments agreed a plan to phase out fossil fuels this century and shift to renewable energies

Angus Taylor Photo gov.au

$124 mi Reef Authority Funding Boost for Townsville

Australia’s lead management agency for the Great Barrier Reef will receive a $124 million funding boost over the next 10 years from the Turnbull Government. The funding commitment for the Townsville-based Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority is great news for the North Queensland region and Townsville, and follows the signing of Australia’s first City Deal for Townsville earlier this month. Frydenberg said the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, which has been managing this acclaimed World Heritage Area for more than 40 years, will receive an additional $34.1 million over

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