Great Lakes News

ASV BEN (Bathymetric Explorer and Navigator) is a custom prototype built by SV Global Unmanned Marine System for University of New Hampshire’s Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping. ASV BEN has a state-of-the art seafloor mapping system that can map depths reaching 650 feet. (Photo: Ocean Exploration Trust)

Searching for Shipwrecks

on shore. Using sonar and GPS, BEN collects data about the lake bottom that can be used to create high-resolution maps. The expedition in Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary also served as a test case, helping engineers improve BEN for future uses.Researchers aboard the R/V Storm, operated by NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab, supported BEN and also conducted mapping and surveying in adjacent areas of the lake. Sponsored by NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, this project marks the first partnership between Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary and Ocean Exploration Trust

Image: RBR

RBR Order to Support Great Lakes RAEON

Scientists have started a coordinated effort to study and monitor the health of the Great Lakes using a large number of RBR loggers and multiparameter sensors.RBR has recently delivered hundreds of world-class scientific instruments to meet the critical requirements of the Real-time Aquatic Ecosystem Observation Network (RAEON).“RAEON will support comprehensive and multidisciplinary research to understand and manage the Great Lakes and will be a reference for researchers worldwide who are investigating freshwater ecosystems,” Dr. Fisk said.“This collaborative hub will enable researcher

Dan Scoville (Photo: OceanGate)

OceanGate Hires Scoville

from Rochester Institute of Technology. He has personally discovered and documented more than 20 deep water shipwrecks including the HMS Ontario, a British warship built in 1780. The HMS Ontario is the oldest confirmed shipwreck and the only fully intact British warship to have ever been found in the Great Lakes.  

An artist’s depiction of LRAUV under sea ice. Using photo-chemical sensors, the robot scans the density of a billowing cloud of oil coming from an ocean floor well. The red and yellow objects are parts of a communication system consisting of antennas suspended under ice from a buoy installed on top of the ice.  Graphic by ADAC.

LRAUV: Arctic Oil-Spill-Mapping Robot Put to the Test

navigation performance data from the test and will tune the navigation algorithms according to the results. Then the team will make three communication buoys and will test them with the robot under ice. The team is targeting to conduct the under-ice test in a large lake in New Hampshire, the Eastern Great Lakes, or Alaska during the winter season.ADAC plans to complete all rigorous testing – including under-ice tests – and the construction of communication relay buoys by the end of June 2019

(Photo: NOAA)

All IOOS Regional Networks Are Now NOAA-certified

to common federal collection, storage and management standards, meaning it can be integrated with other data, and help make "big data" research and development possible.IOOS is a coordinated network of regional associations that compile and distribute data on America’s coastal waters, Great Lakes and oceans. IOOS data, such as water temperature, water level, currents, winds and waves, are collected by many different tools including satellites, buoys, tide gauges, radar stations, animal tags and underwater vehicles.Certification expands the pool of federal-quality data available nationwide

Photo courtesy of Algoma

Algoma Joins Whale Conservation Efforts

Algoma Central Corporation, the largest fleet of dry and liquid bulk carriers on the Great Lakes–St. Lawrence Waterway, is adding the crews from 27 of its vessels to an expanding network of whale watchers. For the first time, the crews on Algoma’s self-unloaders, bulkers, tankers and cement carriers will collect data about the whales they see on their journeys this summer."Algoma is committed to providing sustainable and environmentally responsible marine transportation,” said Gregg Ruhl, Algoma’s Chief Operating Officer. “Taking part in this conservation

The 180-foot RV Lake Guardian is the largest research vessel in the EPA fleet and the largest research vessel operating on the Great Lakes. It has a berthing capacity of 41 people, including 14 crew members and 27 visiting scientists. (Photo: EPA)

EPA Launches Research Vessel to Monitor Lake Ontario

to better protect and restore the lake and its watershed.The Cooperative Science Monitoring Initiative involves U.S. and Canadian federal agencies that are partnering with New York State and the Province of Ontario, as well as academic, environmental and ecological organizations working under the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement aimed at improving the waters of the Great Lakes and issuing a Lakewide Action and Management Plan (LAMP) for each Great Lake on a five-year cycle.This year the EPA launched R/V Lake Guardian, owned by the EPA Great Lakes National Program Office (GLNPO), for Lake Ontario&rsquo

© johnsroad7 / Adobe Stock

Study: Nonnative Species Carried in Lakers' Ballast Water

nonindigenous zooplankton not yet established in western Lake Superior, including Hemimysis anomala (“bloody red shrimp”), in ballast water discharged there. It also detected, in uptake water, a species of zooplankton (Paraleptastacus wilsoni) that had not previously been recorded in the Great Lakes.Some of the species, including this one, live in harbor sediment and may have escaped routine surveillance to date. Determination of whether the collected nonindigenous species of zooplankton might be able to survive or establish in western Lake Superior waters was beyond the scope of the study

(Photo: Moira Harrington)

Revving Up a New ROV

camaraderie, which had its origins aboard the replica three-masted wooden schooner out of Milwaukee, the Denis Sullivan. Last summer, Kurth and Nelson met as part of an educator workshop sponsored by the Minnesota and Wisconsin Sea Grant programs and with financial support from the Center for Great Lakes Literacy. Kurth was not only a dab hand on the boat, having participated in previous sails, but also an enthusiastic mentor for Nelson as they both strive to bring the Great Lakes alive in their classrooms.When asked what she was looking forward to as the day got underway, Kurth responded, &ldquo

© BJ Ray / Adobe Stock

How Could a ‘Sand Motor’ Help the Great Lakes?

in a series of undergraduate research scholars mentored over the years by Hart. Said Hart, "Coastal hazards have been in the news recently. Briana brings a genuine curiosity to the study of coastal processes, and what she learns about the sand motor will be of interest to beach managers along the Great Lakes."

Karina Gould, Minister for Democratic Institutions, on behalf of Dominic LeBlanc, Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, announces new funding for the fight against Asian carps. (Photo: Fisheries and Oceans Canada)

Canada Ramps up Its Fight against Great Lakes’ Asian Carp

Canada’s government has committed up to $20 million over five years, and ongoing, for Asian carp prevention efforts in the Great Lakes.   Asian carps are among the top aquatic invasive species being monitored for their potential establishment in the Great Lakes. Already established in the Mississippi River basin in the U.S., the four species of Asian carps (Bighead, Silver, Grass and Black) aggressively compete with native fishes for food and habitat, and have quickly become the dominant species.   Risk assessments conducted by Canada and the U.S. show that the Great Lakes contains

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