Norwegian University Of Science News

Photo from the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate's recent deep sea mineral exploration mission - Credit: NPD

Environmental Groups Call on Norway to Stop Deep-sea Mining Plans

organization Naturvernforbund (Friends of the Earth Norway) said."Mining on the seabed can destroy species and habitats that have an important role for both the sea and the planet."Steinar Loeve Ellefmo, an associate professor who heads a study program on deep-sea mining at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, said the study wasn't premature."I do not think it can be too early to collect data to learn," he said. (Reporting by Nerijus Adomaitis; editing by David Evans)Norway Eyes Sea Change in Deep Dive for Metals Instead of OilNorwegian Seismic Company Dives

An offshore platform in Norway - Credit:Jone Gundersen/AdobeStock

Norway Eyes Sea Change in Deep Dive for Metals Instead of Oil

copper, zinc, cobalt, gold and silver, according to the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate which conducted the work.There could be up to 21.7 million tonnes of copper - more than the world's copper output in 2019 - and 22.7 million tonnes of zinc on the Norwegian continental shelf, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) researchers have estimated.Related: Norwegian Seismic Company Dives into Deepsea Mining BusinessMean estimates however are far lower, at 6.9 million and 7.1 million tonnes, respectively."Copper mining inside Norway's jurisdiction will probably never replace

Blue Logic Wins ONS Award for Subsea Docking Station for ROVs

– Eelume, SAAB, Oceaneering and Saipem –  to refine the solution and ensure it's functional for the various players.Designed and built close to Blue Logic’s headquarters in Sandnes near Stavanger, multiple docking stations have already been tested, including at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) underwater test facility in Trondheimsfjorden, near Trondheim, as well as by SAAB in Sweden, Oceaneering at the Tau Autonomy Center near Stavanger. One is also due to go to Italy where Saipem will verify its functionality with its underwater vehicles."This

(Photo: Ocean Infinity)

Ocean Infinity Launches Large-scale Ocean Study

Subsea technology and data company Ocean Infinity said it is partnering with the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) to undertake a long term program of marine environmental scientific research onboard its’ vessels.Currently underway, this long term study will lead to the creation of the world’s largest body of physical samples from the deep ocean. The material gathered, which will be made available to scientists and academics, will contribute to providing a base line study of deep sea ecosystems. The information obtained from the samples will contribute to better understan

Saipem’s Hydrone R – in the flesh and ready for real world testing. Image from Saipem.

MTR100: Five "Ones to Watch"

operations. It’s the subsea docking station (SDS) for Equinor’s underwater intervention drone concept (UiD – a name trademarked by Equinor). Two have so far been built, with one now installed in 365m water depth offshore Trondheim, at an open test lab run by the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), and another due to be installed at the Aasgard field offshore Norway, following a detour to Sweden, where it was trailed with a Saab Seaeye Sabertooth AUV. Equinor not only outsourced the creation of these SDSs, but it’s also making the design freely available

Saab Seaeye’s Sabertooth AUV (Photo from Saab Seaeye)

Seaspace Race Underway at Saab Subsea Docking Demo

robotics firm Eelume’s snake-robot on a tether.Another SDS – the first built – is now installed in 365 meters water depth offshore Trondheim, following trials in the DORA facility there, as part of the autonomous underwater technology laboratory test facility run by the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU).During the demonstration event at Motala, Helge Sverre Eide, business manager, Blue Logic, said, “To maximize use of drones, we need to change the way we work and the way we think. If you have made that investment, the work it does is then free.”Ioseba

Co-author Arnfinn Nergaard.

Book Review: Getting Down to It; 50 Years of Subsea Success in Norway

Museum Kristin Øye Gjerde.Nergaard was perhaps destined for a career involving the sea, having been born and raised on the island of Smøla  not far from the Haltenbanken. His original career choice was naval architecture. However, after completing his degree at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU ), or NTU (the Norwegian Institute of Technology) as it was in 1972, he saw the emergence of a new industry, petroleum exploration, and went on to complete an MSc and then a PhD in petroleum technology and applied geophysics, also at NTNU. In fact, he’s the

Tore Erntsen (Photo: Proserv)

Proserv Names Erntsen as CTO

firm took over the subsea controls business of Weatherford and he has been at the forefront of the core commitment to technological innovation, and its application, providing leading edge solutions for global customers.Erntsen  holds an MSc in engineering and ICT, which he gained at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, and he commenced his career in research and development (R&D) with German conglomerate Siemens. He has also worked for SICOM as a senior software developer and development manager.Speaking after his promotion, Erntsen said, “One of my key goals is to work with

Scandinavian Cooperation on Offshore Wind Expanded

The Technical University of Denmark (DTU), the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) and the research institute SINTEF  have signed an agreement to work together on renewable energy, including a new joint research center on offshore wind.Anders Overgaard Bjarklev, president of DTU,  Rector Gunnar Bovim (NTNU) and CEO Alexandra Bech Gjørv (SINTEF) signed the agreement on 16 January.The new center is called the Nordic Offshore Wind R&I Center – NOWRIC. Its goal is to work with the industry to develop better, cheaper solutions for offshore wind farms.DTU, NTNU

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