Ocean Observing Systems News

(Image: Ocean Aero)

NOAA Awards $1 Mln to Enhance, Operate ASV for Remote Sampling

As part of the NOAA-led Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) Ocean Technology Transition (OTT) program, the University of Washington, Oregon State University, Ocean Aero, the Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observing Systems (NANOOS), and NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center partners will receive $1 million in funding over the next three years to enhance and deploy Ocean Aero’s Triton Class autonomous surface vehicle (ASV) to augment HAB sampling at remote offshore locations on the Oregon and Washington coasts.“Harmful Algal Blooms can cause severe environmental, economic

Dr. Jake Kritzer (Photo: NERACOOS)

Kritzer Joins NERACOOS as Executive Director

The Northeastern Regional Association of Coastal Ocean Observing Systems (NERACOOS) announced the appointment of Dr. Jake Kritzer as the organization’s new Executive Director.Dr. Kritzer is taking over from Dr. John Ruaridh “Ru” Morrison, the founding Director and leader of NERACOOS for the past 10 years, who retired from the position in late 2019.NERACOOS, a 501(c)3 non-profit, ensures safety, economic vitality and environmental resilience by producing, integrating, and communicating high-quality ocean information on their open-access website.The NERACOOS hiring committee felt that

We enjoyed tunes from a VJ in the MoPOP Sky Church at the Gala. (Photo courtesy of Rick A. Smith)

Industry Event OCEANS 2019 Seattle A Success

gathered a small fleet of research vessels at Seattle’s waterfront marina for tours on Monday . . . a classic fall day with bright blue skies and cool, crisp air.  Some of the popular features of the conference continued, including the Office of Naval Research and Integrated Ocean Observing Systems sponsored Student Poster Competition (see article elsewhere in this edition), several special Town Halls on key topics such as marine debris and plastics, and a Gala reception at an iconic location – the Frank Gehry-designed Museum of Popular Culture (MoPOP) at The Seattle Center.The

Dr.  Jyotika Virmani and Dr. Marlon Lewis at OceanObs’19. Photo: OceanObs’19

OceanObs’19: Innovation Expanding Ocean Observations

spend years following their favorite bands, others attend conventions for science fiction shows. But once a decade those dedicated to sustained ocean observing gather. The OceanObs conferences are held once every ten years to focus the attention of those planning, implementing, and applying ocean observing systems. Each conference allows this diverse group to review the state of science and operations, and to define goals for the next decade. The decadal conferences are an occasion to celebrate the accomplishments and vision of global ocean observers.300 attendees gathered for The First International

Photo Courtesy of the Marine Technology Society

#Oi2020 History

The era of the “new millennium” made its way within subsea research and development when in 2000, Congress tapped the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy to “investigate and provide recommendations for a ‘coordinated and comprehensive ocean policy’,” according to Advances in Marine Technology (as published by the Marine Technology Society). Following the seven-year investigation and research process, as well as input and public discussion, the commission presented An Ocean Blueprint for the 21st Century, (which according to MTS) included more than 200 recommendations.

A Timelapse of EagleRay Transitioning from Sea to Sky (Credit NCSU)

Drones for Coastal Enviro Management

making increasing impacts in the maritime domain. As the capabilities of these platforms have increased, so have their contributions to maritime science, defense, and industry. Recognizing this, the Alliance for Coastal Technologies (ACT) and the Northeastern Regional Association of Coastal and Ocean Observing Systems (NERACOOS), with support from the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS), convened a workshop on Practical Uses for Drones to Address Management Problems in Coastal Zones at the Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve (WNERR) in Wells, Maine, in late 2018. The workshop was designed

(Photo: JMS Naval Architects)

New Research Vessel for Virginia Institute of Marine Science

in science outfitting allowing for high utilization and affordable operating day rates. The vessel is easily adaptable to evolving scientific research areas such as offshore oil and gas exploration surveys, wind energy development surveys, environmental impact studies, and the servicing of ocean observing systems.Main propulsion is provided by a pair of 660 BHP tier III Cummins QSK 19M engines coupled to a Finnoy 2G27-42FK two–in/one-out marine gear driving a Finnoy 5 blade, 1.95 meter diameter controllable pitch propeller. The propeller turns inside of a Rice thrust nozzle with triple rice

The research vessel Neil Armstrong arrived to recover a surface mooring that is part of the OOI Global Array in the Irminger Sea south of Greenland in 2016. (Photo by James Kuo, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

NSF Awards Contract to Continue Ocean Observatories Initiative

role to ensure that the initiative continues to serve both the science community and the public,” said WHOI President and Director Mark Abbott. “We look forward to continuing to work with NSF and our partners toward the success of the initiative as part of a growing global network of ocean observing systems.”The Project Management Office, which is a new addition to WHOI’s role in the overall operation of the OOI, will report directly to NSF and will provide high-level oversight and financial management of the project. In addition, the office will coordinate with partner institutions

Glider data will help forecasters make better predictions this hurricane season (Photo: NOAA)

Ocean Gliders: The New Storm Chasers

Goni, an oceanographer at NOAA’s Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory who is helping lead the glider research. “Not just at the surface, which we measure with satellites, but down into deeper layers of ocean waters.”Glider data, as well as data from other ocean observing systems showing lower concentrations of salt in surface seawater, can be a clue that this lighter water may form a warm cap that prevents cool water from welling up to the surface. This warm cap can then fuel a hurricane’s strength.Glider data also helps scientists better predict if the cooler

Marine Technology Magazine Cover Sep 2020 -

Marine Technology Reporter is the world's largest audited subsea industry publication serving the offshore energy, subsea defense and scientific communities.

Subscribe
Marine Technology ENews subscription

Marine Technology ENews is the subsea industry's largest circulation and most authoritative ENews Service, delivered to your Email three times per week

Subscribe for MTR E-news