Ocean Observing Systems News

A Timelapse of EagleRay Transitioning from Sea to Sky (Credit NCSU)

Drones for Coastal Enviro Management

making increasing impacts in the maritime domain. As the capabilities of these platforms have increased, so have their contributions to maritime science, defense, and industry. Recognizing this, the Alliance for Coastal Technologies (ACT) and the Northeastern Regional Association of Coastal and Ocean Observing Systems (NERACOOS), with support from the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS), convened a workshop on Practical Uses for Drones to Address Management Problems in Coastal Zones at the Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve (WNERR) in Wells, Maine, in late 2018. The workshop was designed

(Photo: JMS Naval Architects)

New Research Vessel for Virginia Institute of Marine Science

in science outfitting allowing for high utilization and affordable operating day rates. The vessel is easily adaptable to evolving scientific research areas such as offshore oil and gas exploration surveys, wind energy development surveys, environmental impact studies, and the servicing of ocean observing systems.Main propulsion is provided by a pair of 660 BHP tier III Cummins QSK 19M engines coupled to a Finnoy 2G27-42FK two–in/one-out marine gear driving a Finnoy 5 blade, 1.95 meter diameter controllable pitch propeller. The propeller turns inside of a Rice thrust nozzle with triple rice

The research vessel Neil Armstrong arrived to recover a surface mooring that is part of the OOI Global Array in the Irminger Sea south of Greenland in 2016. (Photo by James Kuo, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

NSF Awards Contract to Continue Ocean Observatories Initiative

role to ensure that the initiative continues to serve both the science community and the public,” said WHOI President and Director Mark Abbott. “We look forward to continuing to work with NSF and our partners toward the success of the initiative as part of a growing global network of ocean observing systems.”The Project Management Office, which is a new addition to WHOI’s role in the overall operation of the OOI, will report directly to NSF and will provide high-level oversight and financial management of the project. In addition, the office will coordinate with partner institutions

Glider data will help forecasters make better predictions this hurricane season (Photo: NOAA)

Ocean Gliders: The New Storm Chasers

Goni, an oceanographer at NOAA’s Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory who is helping lead the glider research. “Not just at the surface, which we measure with satellites, but down into deeper layers of ocean waters.”Glider data, as well as data from other ocean observing systems showing lower concentrations of salt in surface seawater, can be a clue that this lighter water may form a warm cap that prevents cool water from welling up to the surface. This warm cap can then fuel a hurricane’s strength.Glider data also helps scientists better predict if the cooler

WHOI machinist and resident facilitator D.C. Collasius finishes a part he produced using a 3D resin printer in the new DunkWorks rapid protyping facility. (Photo by Tom Kleindinst, © Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

Moore Foundation Awards $3 Mln to WHOI

and deploys technology ranging from individual sensors to comprehensive, round-the-clock observing systems. By integrating new ideas and exploring new partnerships, WHOI researchers aim to foster an environment that reduces the cost of ocean science and engineering and that enables more flexible ocean observing systems that can rapidly incorporate new technologies to meet evolving science objectives and requirements.  The award follows from a $250,000 grant to WHOI in 2016 by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation to explore new processes for ocean engineering using autonomous underwater vehicles

Richard Gage (Photo: OceanWorks)

Gage Joins OceanWorks

are effective, project risks are identified and mitigated in a timely manner, and the company continues to deliver on-time on budget projects.   Gage’s experience is directly in line with OceanWorks’ growing subsea technology business in oil and gas, submarine rescue and ocean observing systems. He brings to OceanWorks an awarded skillset established at BCHydro, where his PMO was the recipient of the Project Management Institute (PMI) Office of the Year Award for 2016.  

Image: JMS Naval Architects

Virginia Institute of Marine Science Orders Research Vessel

in science outfitting allowing for high utilization and affordable operating day rates. The vessel is easily adaptable to evolving scientific research areas such as offshore oil and gas exploration surveys, wind energy development surveys, environmental impact studies, and the servicing of ocean observing systems.   Main propulsion is provided by a pair of 660 BHP tier III diesel engines coupled to a two–in/one-out marine gear driving a controllable pitch propeller shrouded within a nozzle. This unique arrangement will provide the capability to operate the vessel efficiently on a single

(Copyright: Alfred-Wegener-Institut / Folke Mehrtens)

A United Front in Ocean Observation

implementation. As most of the ocean lies beyond the jurisdiction of individual nations, coordinated international collaborations, such as the European Multidisciplinary Seafloor and water-column Observatory (EMSO) and Euro-Argo, are essential for developing and operating fit-for-purpose ocean observing systems and their integration into modeling and forecasting activities. The EU has also been active in implementing a Europe-wide effort to promote the accessibility and use by multiple sectors of marine data. The European Marine Observation and Data Network (EMODnet) is Commission action designed

Image: IOOS

IOOS Awards $31 Mln for Ocean Observation

IOOS Regional Information Coordination Entity (RICE) certification will recognize MARACOOS’ high quality data, providing a springboard for expanded use of MARACOOS/IOOS data by government, the private sector, and others across the Mid-Atlantic. The Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observing Systems (NANOOS), efforts are focused on continuing investment in observing infrastructure in the coastal ocean, estuaries, and shorelines of Oregon and Washington. These diverse assets provide real-time information and integrated data products to answer questions such as: when the conditions are

“Many would agree that the ocean is a highly under sampled environment. We see our role as facilitating good decision-making by providing the instruments and platforms that allow society to collect as much accurate and quantitative data as possible, at as low of a cost as possible in order to facilitate more informed decision making.”  Bill Kikendall Teledyne Marine Sensors & Systems Group

MTR100: Teledyne Marine Sensors & Systems (PART I)

for marine environments. Teledyne Benthos products include: acoustic releases, acoustic telemetry modems, positioning systems, hydrophones, remotely operated vehicles (ROVs), glass flotation spheres and instrument housings, and locating devices. These tools provide the building blocks of ocean observing systems for diverse users. Benthos technologies were part of the discovery of the RMS Titanic, contribute to astrophysical observatories and provide access to the deepest ocean depths. •    Teledyne Gavia Located in Kopavogur, Iceland, Teledyne Gavia provides turnkey survey

(Photo courtesy of Adrian Round, Dir. of Observatory Operations, ONC)

Biofouling Foiled: UV Light Harnessed for Biofouling Control

Pinnacle platform, Ocean Networks Canada has played a key role in the testing of UV biofouling control. Tom Dakin, Sensor Technologies Development Officer at ONC, is looking forward to seeing the effect this technology will have on ocean monitoring: Biofouling is obviously a problem on our ocean observing systems. Poison is an undesirable mitigation strategy due to the long term environmental implications. Repeated manual cleaning is expensive and wipers are effective only on limited surfaces. The announcement of a UV antifouling system was therefore greeted with interest, but cautiously. A technology

Marine Technology Magazine Cover Jun 2019 - Hydrographic Survey: Single & Multibeam Sonar

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