Oil Recovery News

Crews aboard M/V SHELIA BORDELON offload more than 450,000 gallons of oil from the Coimbra shipwreck 30 miles offshore from Shinnecock, N.Y. U.S. Coast Guard responders discovered a significant amount of oil in cargo and fuel tanks during onsite assessments of the Coimbra in May 2019. (US Coast Guard photo by Michael Himes)

Oil Recovered from WWII Shipwreck

, state, local and commercial partners and response crews ensured a safe, efficient and productive operation. We applaud their diligence and tremendous work.”DEC Commissioner Basil Seggos said, “DEC thanks the Coast Guard for collaborating with New York State throughout this large-scale oil recovery operation. The 450,000 gallons removed from the Coimbra over the last three months were a hidden threat to the health of Long Island’s marine fishery and the South Shore’s environment and now the potential impact has been abated. The Coimbra now complements New York’s growing

Scottish Government minister for Energy, Connectivity and the Islands, Paul Wheelhouse MSP with Ian Donald, Enpro Subsea managing director (Photo: Enpro Subsea)

Enpro Testing New FIS Technology

;s head of Energy and Low Carbon Technologies, viewed Enpro’s FIS 15kpsi technology first-hand at Subsea Expo Tuesday, in Aberdeen.Ian Donald, Enpro Subsea managing director said, “Our vision is to develop a range of production technologies and services which increase production and oil recovery from our client’s assets. The investment combined with R&D funding from Scottish Enterprise in 2017 provided us with the ideal opportunity to increase our capabilities in the deepwater intervention arena, building on our success to date.“We are seeing more adoption for the Flow

All-electric actuated subsea boosting system. Image: Schlumberger

Schlumberger Bags Equinor Contract for Subsea Boosting System

Field through the delivery of a subsea boosting system,” said Don Sweet, president, OneSubsea, Schlumberger.“Our field-proven boosting technology, including electric actuation, will deliver an increased level of digital monitoring and control—this will be a key enabler for increasing oil recovery and unlocking the field’s full production potential, while reducing environmental impact,” Sweet added.Work will begin in Bergen, Norway, in December 2018 and the first delivery is scheduled for February Q1 2020

Vigdis subsea installation (Photo: Andre´ Osmundsen / Equinor)

Vigdis Gets a Boost

in the Norwegian North Sea.The new boosting station, expected to come online in the first quarter of 2021, is expected to raise production by almost 11 million barrels at the subsea field Vigdis, which has been producing oil through the Snorre field for more than 20 years.“This is an improved oil recovery project which includes a multiphase boosting station that will increase production from existing wells. This adds new oil barrels at a highly competitive price,” said Torger Rød, Equinor’s senior vice president for project management control.The boosting station will be connected

Baía Farta (Photo: Damen)

Angola’s New Fishery Research Vessel Delivered

7417 type vessel ordered in July 2016 and officially launched in November 2017, is equipped for the full range of fisheries research and assessment activities including hydrographic operations, acoustics research, pelagic and demersal trawling, plankton, water, environmental and geographical sampling, oil recovery and emergency towage operations, the shipbuilder said.The Baía Farta has been built to Silent-A/F/R Class notation standards. To maximize her effectiveness in her role, every care has been taken in her design, construction and outfitting to minimize underwater noise as well as onboard internal

Photo: Harald Pettersen / Equinor

Equinor to Boost Drilling to Extend Norwegian Shelf Life

and gas production in Norway towards 2030, but needed new measures to tackle a decline after that, including a deliberate push to find more natural gas."We aim to achieve an average recovery rate of 60 and 85 per cent respectively at our oil and gas fields. This is almost twice the average global oil recovery rate of 35 per cent," Arne Sygve Nylund, Equinor's head of development and production in Norway, said.Equinor's current recovery rate for oil stands at 50 percent. The company did not provide a recovery rate for gas.Nylund didn’t say when the company aimed to achieve the target

Image: American Bureau of Shipping (ABS)

ABS Issues Subsea Processing Advisory

the effects of external pressure on SPRS design, long-distance power transmission/distribution, and optimized monitoring and control systems.While the industry is actively addressing these challenges, near-term field applications primarily focus on subsea boosting systems and components for enhanced oil recovery, increasing tie-back distances and extending field life. As part of this effort, ABS is dedicated to supporting the industry by engaging in various R&D activities and industry initiatives to advance the development of subsea processing technologies and their implementation

Fishery Research Vessel 7417 Baía Farta (Photo: Damen)

Research Vessel Launched for Angolan Fisheries Ministry

Dra. Isabel Cristóvão, director of Gabinete de Estudos, Planeamento e Estatística.   The FRV 7417 is suited to various purposes, including hydrographic operations, acoustics research, pelagic and demersal trawling, plankton, water, environmental and geographical sampling, oil recovery and emergency towing operations. “[The vessel] will enable the Angolan Fisheries Ministry to carry out research into its fishing grounds that will help to develop and preserve the nation’s industry and environment,” said Friso Visser, Damen Regional Director Africa. Baí

(Credit: U.S. Coast Guard)

'Roomba' in the Arctic

to the oil.  Mobility – getting to the pollution – is critical.   As most mariners likely know, in the United States, oil cannot be deliberately spilled or discharged into open waters even for research and testing and, accordingly, the AWS 1701 expedition did not include actual oil recovery. And, the Healy’s 2017 expedition was in U.S. waters. (Norway, reportedly, is the only country that allows such tests, but under strict controls.)   For this mission, the primary goal was to demonstrate the ability of the skimmer to (1) maneuver around larger icebergs and (2) using

Project to Standardize Subsea Processing Progressing

cost drivers.”    Kjell Eriksson, Regional Manager Norway, DNV GL – Oil & Gas, said, “Like more conventional solutions, subsea processing must prove to be cost efficient to be considered attractive. At the same time, subsea processing will be an enabler for increased oil recovery. Through collaboration with the big players in the subsea industry, this JIP drives subsea processing towards being a competitive and viable solution for a wide range of future oil and gas fields.”   Phase 2 will be completed in 18 months

Norway Wants Oil Companies to Use Technology to Boost Output

Norway wants oil companies to look into using specialised technology to pump more crude and natural gas, the country's petroleum regulator said on Thursday, potentially producing billions of extra barrels as well as tax revenues. Enhanced oil recovery (EOR), such as injection of polymers or carbon dioxide into reservoirs, could help to produce an additional 320-860 million cubic metres (2-5.4 billion barrels) of oil equivalents from the 27 largest fields offshore Norway, industry regulator NPD said. "We will try to use all the instruments we have to convince the companies to test (EOR) and

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