Schmidt Ocean Institute News

All images courtesy Schmidt Ocean Institute

Subsea Discovery: SOI Releases Images from Study of NW Australian Deep Corals

seafloor of the entire mesophotic (deep water) zone in Ashmore Reef Marine Park.Scientists discovered a sea snake thought to be locally extinct and saw several species such as the great spotted cowrie (Perissersoa guttata) for the first time in the Ashmore Reef Marine Park, off Australia, during Schmidt Ocean Institute's 18-day expedition that concluded this week.A team of scientists, led by Dr. Karen Miller of the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS), also documented for the first time in high-resolution great diversity in coral-dominated areas, calcareous algal beds, and sponge gardens,

Polar Queen/Credit: GC Rieber Shipping

GC Rieber Delivers Polar Queen to Schmidt Ocean Institute

Norwegian offshore vessel owner GC Rieber Shipping has delivered the Polar Queen vessel to new owners Schmidt Ocean Institute. The company announced the sale of the IMR vessel in February."The vessel has today been delivered to the new owner," GC Rieber Shipping said in a brief statement on Tuesday, without disclosing the name of the buyer. U.S.-based Schmidt Ocean Institute has said it acquired the vessel—now renamed Falkor (too)—for use as an oceanographic research ship.The Polar Queen is an IMR / walk-to-work vessel, built at Freire Shipyard in 2011. The gangway that was on

Image courtesy Schmidt Ocean Institute

Deep Sea Science:Deep Sea Reveals Insights on Human Immunity

cells can recognize any bacteria they come across. The study, conducted by researchers at the Rotjan Marine Ecology Lab at Boston University, the Kagan Lab at Boston Children's Hospital and the government of Kiribati, looked at the properties of bacteria from the deep sea collected on a Schmidt Ocean Institute expedition in the Southern Pacific Ocean.Bacteria from the deep sea were found to have "immuno-silent properties" that neither harm nor benefit the body and in fact are not even detected by the immune system. Those unique properties could be used to better understand how the human

Broad mapping profile of new 500 m detached reef. Credit: Schmidt Ocean Institute

Ocean Discovery: 500m Tall Coral Reef Discovered in the Great Barrier Reef

Scientists have discovered a massive detached coral reef in the Great Barrier Reef, the first to be discovered in over 120 years, Schmidt Ocean Institute announced.Measuring more than 500m high, the reef was discovered by Australian scientists aboard Schmidt Ocean Institute’s research vessel Falkor, currently on a 12-month exploration of the ocean surrounding Australia.The reef was first found on Oct. 20, as a team of scientists led by Dr. Robin Beaman from James Cook University was conducting underwater mapping of the northern Great Barrier Reef seafloor. The team then conducted a dive on Oct.

As ROV SuBastian makes its way up the slopes of the seamounts and canyons the team has been exploring this expedition, the changes in light, temperature, pressure, and other environmental factors are remarkable. From the dark and cold soft sediments of the plateau floor to exposed rocky escarpments, fields of mesophotic black corals, and eventually the well-lit realms of the upper slopes and reef crest - these changes lead to a whole gradient of habitats suitable in different ways for many diffe

New Corals Discovered at Great Barrier Reef

;s first observation of an extremely rare fish. They also took critical habitat samples that will lead to a greater understanding of the spatial relationships between seabed features and the animals found in the Coral Sea.The complex and scientifically challenging research was completed aboard Schmidt Ocean Institute’s research vessel Falkor, on its fourth expedition of the year, as part of the Institute’s Australia campaign. Using a remotely operated underwater vehicle (ROV) to view high-resolution video of the bottom of the ocean floor, some 1,820 meters deep, the science team examined

Dr. Virmani in front of Schmidt Ocean Institute's research vessel Falkor in Fremantle, Australia prior to the vessel's departure for its Ningaloo Canyons expedition. © Schmidt Ocean Institute

Ocean Influencer: Dr. Jyotika Virmani, Schmidt Ocean Institute

The July/August edition of Marine Technology Reporter, the 15th Annual "MTR100", recognizes Dr. Jyotika Virmani, Schmidt Ocean Institute’s (SOI) first executive director, as an 'Ocean Influencer.' Virmani defines what it means to be passionate and motivated in the field of marine science and exploration. Her humble start began in her hometown of Manchester, England, inspired by the nearby Lovell Telescope — which was then the world’s largest steerable dish radio telescope. Today, her interests and studies, spanning atmosphere to ocean, have guided her drive to

A striking image of Hollardia goslinei. This is a species of deep-water spike fish native to Hawaii. ROV footage of this species occurring in Australia puts it very far away from its known 'home' range. © Schmidt Ocean Institute

SOI: Amidst Pandemic, Seafloor Mapping Zooms Ahead

Scientists working remotely with Schmidt Ocean Institute (SOI) have completed a first look at deep waters in the Coral Sea, despite the continuing COVID-19 pandemic. As one of the only at-sea science expeditions to continue operations, the team has discovered the deepest living hard corals in Eastern Australian waters, sighted fish in new regions and identified up to 10 new marine species.SOI’s R/V Falkor spent the 46 days in the Coral Sea Marine Park, one of the largest protected areas in the world. Scientists connected remotely to the ship from their homes, collecting high-resolution seafloor

Metal debris – a food tin found at 4,947 meters (3.07 miles) depth in Sirena Canyon off the Mariana Islands. Image courtesy of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, 2016 Deepwater Exploration of the Marianas. (Photo: NOAA)

New Study Tracks Trash Found at the Ocean's Depths

a new study has shown that even unexplored, remote and protected areas of the central and western Pacific deep ocean are not immune from our touch.Coordinated deepwater exploration from 2015 to 2017 via remotely operated vehicle expeditions conducted onboard NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer and the Schmidt Ocean Institute’s Research Vessel Falkor enabled new insights into the status of deep-sea marine debris. These expeditions included exploration of sites within U.S. protected areas and monuments, Exclusive Economic Zones of other countries, international protected areas, and areas beyond national

Photo: Schmidt Ocean Institute

Schmidt Offers Online Educational Content for Students

As millions of school age children transition their education to home classrooms in the wake of the devastating COVID-19 global pandemic, Schmidt Ocean Institute has assembled a wealth of free online science resources for parents and teachers.Schmidt Ocean Institute’s compilation of online educational videos and educational resources, drawn from the world’s leading universities and science organizations--like NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and Western Australian Museum -- are designed to help students gain an understanding of, and appreciation for, the

Marine Technology Reporter takes a deep dive into Oceanography in its February 2021 eMagazine edition, including insights on the GO-BGC Array Project to Monitor Ocean Health.
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