Scripps Institution Of Oceanography News

(Photo: Scripps Institution of Oceanography)

NOAA, Scripps Partner on Unmanned Systems

NOAA’s Office of Marine and Aviation Operations and Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego are partnering to improve how unmanned systems (UxS) are used to collect important ocean observations and augment NOAA’s operational capabilities.The 10-year agreement provides a framework for Scripps and OMAO’s new Unmanned Systems Operations Program to collaborate on specific projects to further UxS research, development and operations.“The operational experience of NOAA’s fleet of ships and aircraft combined with the extensive research and

Del Mar Oceanographic, RBR Ink Deal

Del Mar Oceanographic (DMO) and RBR signed a collaboration agreement for the provision of Wirewalkers with RBR CTDs and sensors in Australia and New Zealand.The DMO Wirewalker, originally designed at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, is a field-proven vertically profiling instrument platform powered by ocean waves.  Attached to a free-drifting or moored buoy, the Wirewalker ratchets downward along a suspension wire under wave power. At a predetermined depth, the ratchet releases and the profiler then ascends at its terminal velocity (~0.5m/s), completely decoupled from sea-surface motion.

A close up of the bionic skeleton of the 3D-printed coral structures, which were used to grow algae.© Daniel Wangpraseurt

Scripps Institution of Oceanography: 3D-printed Coral Are Natural Producers of Biofuels

Researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego, alongside the University of Cambridge, UK, have 3D printed coral-like structures capable of growing dense microscopic algae populations. The work is aimed at the development of compact, efficient bioreactors for producing algae-based biofuels and could lead to a better understanding of the coral-algae relationship, with the hopes of establishing techniques to repair and restore reefs.Author Daniel Wangpraseurt, whose work was published April 9, 2020 in Nature Communications, explained, “Cor

A close up of the bionic skeleton of the 3D-printed coral structures, which were used to grow algae. © Daniel Wangpraseurt

Scripps Institution of Oceanography: 3D-printed Coral Are Natural Producers of Biofuels

Researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego, alongside the University of Cambridge, UK, have 3D printed coral-like structures capable of growing dense microscopic algae populations. The work is aimed at the development of compact, efficient bioreactors for producing algae-based biofuels and could lead to a better understanding of the coral-algae relationship, with the hopes of establishing techniques to repair and restore reefs.Author Daniel Wangpraseurt, whose work was published April 9, 2020 in Nature Communications, explained, “Cor

Nortek and Del Mar Oceanographic are collaborating to give researchers from around the globe a cost-effective way to answer vital questions surrounding the functioning of ocean processes. Image: Nortek

Case Study: Helping Ocean Researchers Obtain Hi-Resolution Measurements at a Lower Cost

structure doesn’t provide information regarding the vertical ocean structure, which is all-important. A series of instruments along a mooring is expensive, especially if many types of measurements are to be collected,” explains Dr. Andrew J. Lucas. He is Assistant Professor at Scripps Institution of Oceanography and Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at UC San Diego, and co-founder of Del Mar Oceanographic.Further offshore, costs continue to mount. Here, instruments are lowered down and pulled up through the water column by diesel-powered winches on a ship.Together with Dr

Photo: Schmidt Ocean Institute

Schmidt Offers Online Educational Content for Students

ecosystems.The current expedition, led by Dr. Nerida Wilson from the Western Australian Museum, began in Fremantle on March 8 and is currently scheduled to continue through April 8. On board are scientists from the Western Australian Museum, Geoscience Australia, Curtin University, and Scripps Institution of Oceanography The science team is using underwater robot SuBastian to collect 4K video and implement cutting-edge sampling techniques from the deep sea. This will allow the research team to get a more complete picture of the biodiversity of this unique environment. The team has uploaded footage

Fig.1: A Slocum glider from Teledyne Webb Research, en route to deployment. Credit: Rutgers University.

Measuring the Hostile Ocean Beneath Hurricanes

industry in a team effort to use technology to better protect coastal communities.Measuring the Changing Ocean Beneath Hurricane MichaelProfiling float technology has transformed how the ocean is observed. This method was pioneered by scientists and engineers at Teledyne Webb Research and Scripps Institution of Oceanography. The international Argo program has deployed fleets of these devices for sustained and widespread exploration of the global ocean. The resulting data sets form a rich resource for studying climate and ocean processes.Many of these devices are the Autonomous Profiling Explorer (APEX)

(Photo by Scripps Institution of Oceanography)

Coast Guard, Scripps Launch Blue Technology Center of Expertise

The U.S. Coast Guard and Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego will launch the Blue Technology Center of Expertise (COE) on the Scripps Oceanography campus with a ribbon-cutting ceremony and expo in San Diego, Friday.Rep. John Garamendi, Rep. Scott Peters, Rep. Mike Levin, UCSD Chancellor Pradeep Khosla, Port of San Diego Commissioner Marshall Merrifield, Coast Guard Deputy Commandant for Mission Support, Vice Adm. Michael F. McAllister, and the 11th Coast Guard District Commander, Rear Adm. Peter W. Gautier, are scheduled to speak at the event to celebrate the

Photo by Paul Humann, copyright Grouper Moon Project

Conservation for Endangered Reef Fish Yields Results

Nassau Grouper populations increased threefold in response to dynamic fishing management actions in the Cayman IslandsA new study from researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego has documented a successful recovery effort among Nassau Grouper populations in the Cayman Islands thanks to an approach involving government agencies, academic researchers, and nonprofit organizations.The study, published January 6, 2020 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, used a two-pronged approach including tagging and video census data for monitoring

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