Scripps Institution Of Oceanography News

(U.S. Navy photo by John F. Williams)

#OI2020: FLIP(ped)

that remain visible after the crew of the Floating Instrument Platform, or FLIP, partially flood the ballast tanks causing the vessel to turn stern first into the ocean. The 355-foot research vessel, owned by the Office of Naval Research and operated by the Marine Physical Laboratory at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at University of California, conducts investigations in a number of fields, including acoustics, oceanography, meteorology and marine mammal observation. Marine Technology Reporter has been commissioned to publish the Official “Oceanology International 50th Anniversary Edition&rd

Weddell Sea polynya, initally 3,700 square miles, 2017. False color NASA satellite image shows ice in blue, clouds in white. (Photo: Scripps Institution of Oceanography)

Robotic Data Help Explain Mysterious Holes

, this was the first time oceanographers had a chance to truly monitor the unexpected gap in Antarctic winter sea ice. It was an opportunity that came about as a result of uncanny timing and a seasoned oceanographer’s knowledge of the sea.A new study co-authored by researchers from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego combines satellite images of the sea ice cover and data collected by robotic drifters and even seals outfitted with sensors to better understand the phenomenon. The research led by the University of Washington (UW) explores why this hole appears

Fetch AZA is a self-calibrating long-life subsea sensor logging node that enables data to be wirelessly extracted via its integrated high speed acoustic modem with a battery life option of up to 10 years. (Photo: D. Chadwell, Scripps Institute of Oceanography (Webb/Chadwell/Nooner US NSF GeoPRISMS project))

Canada's New Observatory Uses 'Seafloor GPS'

.The NCSZO is led by Ocean Networks Canada (ONC)—an initiative of the University of Victoria—and is made possible through cooperation of international partners that include Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) scientists at the Pacific Geoscience Center and David Chadwell from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. More than 20 Sonardyne Fetch subsea sensor logging nodes, which will be deployed in depths ranging from 400 to 2,500 meters of water depth for seven years or longer at a time, will comprise the backbone of the NCSZO.Data will be acquired up to two times a year using a technique called

Image by Pacific Power Group

Scripps Adds New Research Vessel

The Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego has added to its fleet a fourth research vessel, which was constructed by Armstrong Marine. The research vessel Bob and Betty Beyster is expected to launch in mid-April for use in San Diego.Armstrong Marine of Port Angeles, Washington, designed the 42-foot aluminum hulled boat. Pacific Power Group, working closely with Armstrong, fit the vessel with a Volvo Penta IPS 650 propulsion system. This is the first time PPG has mated the IPS configuration with an aluminum hulled boat.“We took a lot of time with the Scripps

Marine Technology Reporter published a supplement to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Oceanology International. Photo: MTR

Oi: Tracking 50 Years of Ocean Innovation

sea were going to feed the world. People were building manned submersibles to go exploring in the deep. Aerospace companies were building submersibles, like Lockheed, North American, Rockwell and Westinghouse.”A lot had happened in the years before, recalls Kevin Hardy, who worked at Scripps Institution of Oceanography from 1972 to 2012, from the invention of pingers and even o-rings – a small component perhaps, but one that brought a break-though by improving seal reliability. The French invention and commercialization of the Aqua-Lung had provided scientists unprecedented access to their

OiA ’19 Conference Chairman, Ralph Rayner, on stage at Catch The Next Wave in San Diego in 2017. Photo: Oceanology International

Oi Americas Set for San Diego

a 2012 expedition to repeat Walsh’s momentous 1960 Mariana Trench dive.Confirmed speakers for Catch The Next Wave include Michael Gernhardt, NASA Astronaut and Manager of Environmental Physiology Laboratory, Johnson Space Center; Douglas Bartlett, Professor of Marine Microbiology, Scripps Institution of Oceanography; and Kelly Benoit-Bird, Senior Scientist, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI).Of central importance to the conference schedule will be a string of technical tracks running across all three days of OiA ’19 and training a spotlight on the topics of Ocean ICT; Unmanned

Walter Munk, 2017 (Photo: Erik Jepsen/UC San Diego)

Walter Munk: 1917-2019

Walter Munk, who gave the Allies a strategic edge in World War II, helped nurture a university into existence, and became a living synonym for oceanography, died February 8 at his home in La Jolla, Calif. He was 101.As a geophysicist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego, Munk made groundbreaking observations of waves, ocean temperature, tidal energy in the deep ocean, ocean acoustics and the rotation of the earth. As an advocate of science and broader scholarship, Munk served as an advisor to presidents and the Pentagon and conferred with public figures

Zooglider (top) with a selection of zooplankton imagery the robot has captured. Top photo: Benjamin Whitmore

New Robot Can Sense Plankton Optically and Acoustically

of biological and physical oceanographers and engineers have modified a common physical oceanography instrument to be able to image zooplankton as it glides through the ocean.The robot, a first-of-its-kind sensing instrument dubbed Zooglider by Mark Ohman, a biological oceanographer at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego, uses as its platform a Scripps-developed glider known as Spray. Ohman and Scripps instrument developers outfitted the torpedo-shaped Spray gliders with a camera (called Zoocam) and a device researchers call Zonar that gathers acoustic data

Gulf of Mexico Sea-surface altitude indicating surface current speed (Image: Louisiana State University / NOAA)

New Research on Gulf of Mexico Loop Current

North Carolina State University in cooperation with Centro de Investigación Científica y de Educación Superior de Ensenada (Center for Scientific Research and Higher Education at Ensenada), Chevron, Florida State University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and University of California – Santa CruzPassive Gulf of Mexico Loop Current Observations from HF Radar Across the Yucatan StraitThis project will procure, install, and operate high frequency radar systems to measure surface currents at two locations in the Yucatan Channel region

Photo: Schmidt Ocean Institute

Subsea Robotics: SOI Mission Discovers New Hydrothermal Vent and Species

from California Institute of Technology, and David Caress from MBARI, along with scientists from Oregon State University, the Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, the Centro de Investigación Científica y de Educación Superior de Ensenada (CICESE), and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, demonstrated the multi-disciplinary use of submarine robotics while investigating an area of unique geologic activity where submarine volcanism in heavily sedimented basins results in high temperature venting with unusual chemistry and geology.The nested-scale mapping approach allowed

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