Scripps Institution Of Oceanography News

(Photo by Scripps Institution of Oceanography)

Coast Guard, Scripps Launch Blue Technology Center of Expertise

The U.S. Coast Guard and Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego will launch the Blue Technology Center of Expertise (COE) on the Scripps Oceanography campus with a ribbon-cutting ceremony and expo in San Diego, Friday.Rep. John Garamendi, Rep. Scott Peters, Rep. Mike Levin, UCSD Chancellor Pradeep Khosla, Port of San Diego Commissioner Marshall Merrifield, Coast Guard Deputy Commandant for Mission Support, Vice Adm. Michael F. McAllister, and the 11th Coast Guard District Commander, Rear Adm. Peter W. Gautier, are scheduled to speak at the event to celebrate the

Photo by Paul Humann, copyright Grouper Moon Project

Conservation for Endangered Reef Fish Yields Results

Nassau Grouper populations increased threefold in response to dynamic fishing management actions in the Cayman IslandsA new study from researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego has documented a successful recovery effort among Nassau Grouper populations in the Cayman Islands thanks to an approach involving government agencies, academic researchers, and nonprofit organizations.The study, published January 6, 2020 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, used a two-pronged approach including tagging and video census data for monitoring

(Photo: Maddie Hunt Photography
/ Armstrong Marine)

Research Vessel Delivered to Orca Maritime

Harbor. The vessel will enter service immediately, beginning with a week-long operation around San Clemente Island.The second IPS-drive catamaran delivered by Armstrong, the 4216-CTC model was selected by Orca Maritime after the builder delivered the same design to UC San Diego’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography (R/V Bob and Betty Beyster) in 2019.Orca Maritime will utilize the workboat in support of Department of Defense initiatives, environmental agencies, energy sectors, and commercial enterprise. Vessel operations will include the launch and recovery of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV)

The Sea Ox enters the surf in Jacksonville, Fla. (Photo: Rob Howard)

Video: Robotic Surf Crawler

speed sensors.The vehicle can be used in autonomous mode using inertial systems or GPS, and can be driven using RF antenna, RF buoy or using a tether. Trialed this summer at ANTX, the inertial system achieved a misclosure of 3.38m after a 2,813m mission with 44 turns.C-2 Innovations said Scripps Institution of Oceanography has had one of its vehicles in use for four years, and USACE North Carolina FRF has a contract to purchase one.Nick Townley, business development, C-2 Innovations, with the Sea Ox (Photo: Rob Howard

 Photo by Michael Fox, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Study: How Much of Corals’ Nutrition Comes From Hunting

microscopic algae living inside of them, but if those algae aren’t creating enough sustenance, corals can use their tentacles to grab and eat tiny prey swimming nearby.A new study from researchers at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), the University of New Mexico, and Scripps Institution of Oceanography is revealing that more of corals’ nutrients come from this sort of hunting than previously expected, information that may help predict the fate of coral reefs as global ocean temperatures rise. The study published Sept. 17, 2019, in the journal Functional Ecology.“When

Crab Comms: "It's not hunger pains, I just want to talk ..."

Scientists Discover New Method of Communication in Crabs: Ghost crabs use structure in their stomach to communicate when agitated.  Researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and the University of California Berkeley have discovered a new method of communication in the Atlantic ghost crab, Ocypode quadrata. The findings were published September 11 in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences.Using a combination of research methods, the scientists found that Atlantic ghost crabs – native to the western Atlantic

Seawater temperature measurements taken at Scripps Pier. (Photo Credit: Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego)

#Oi2020 History

During the summer of 2018, a research team at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego logged in the warmest sea surface temperature at the Ellen Browning Scripps Memorial Pier. According to Scripps, the logged temperature was 78.6 degrees Fahrenheit—the highest since recording began in August 1916—and the same year Scripps researchers began sea-surface temperature and salinity readings at the pier.In 1925, Scripps began taking seafloor water temperature measurements, and the daily collection is still completed by hand and maintained by the institution&rs

(U.S. Navy photo by John F. Williams)

#OI2020: FLIP(ped)

that remain visible after the crew of the Floating Instrument Platform, or FLIP, partially flood the ballast tanks causing the vessel to turn stern first into the ocean. The 355-foot research vessel, owned by the Office of Naval Research and operated by the Marine Physical Laboratory at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at University of California, conducts investigations in a number of fields, including acoustics, oceanography, meteorology and marine mammal observation. Marine Technology Reporter has been commissioned to publish the Official “Oceanology International 50th Anniversary Edition&rd

Weddell Sea polynya, initally 3,700 square miles, 2017. False color NASA satellite image shows ice in blue, clouds in white. (Photo: Scripps Institution of Oceanography)

Robotic Data Help Explain Mysterious Holes

, this was the first time oceanographers had a chance to truly monitor the unexpected gap in Antarctic winter sea ice. It was an opportunity that came about as a result of uncanny timing and a seasoned oceanographer’s knowledge of the sea.A new study co-authored by researchers from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego combines satellite images of the sea ice cover and data collected by robotic drifters and even seals outfitted with sensors to better understand the phenomenon. The research led by the University of Washington (UW) explores why this hole appears

Fetch AZA is a self-calibrating long-life subsea sensor logging node that enables data to be wirelessly extracted via its integrated high speed acoustic modem with a battery life option of up to 10 years. (Photo: D. Chadwell, Scripps Institute of Oceanography (Webb/Chadwell/Nooner US NSF GeoPRISMS project))

Canada's New Observatory Uses 'Seafloor GPS'

.The NCSZO is led by Ocean Networks Canada (ONC)—an initiative of the University of Victoria—and is made possible through cooperation of international partners that include Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) scientists at the Pacific Geoscience Center and David Chadwell from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. More than 20 Sonardyne Fetch subsea sensor logging nodes, which will be deployed in depths ranging from 400 to 2,500 meters of water depth for seven years or longer at a time, will comprise the backbone of the NCSZO.Data will be acquired up to two times a year using a technique called

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