Scripps Institution Of Oceanography News

The Sea Ox enters the surf in Jacksonville, Fla. (Photo: Rob Howard)

Video: Robotic Surf Crawler

speed sensors.The vehicle can be used in autonomous mode using inertial systems or GPS, and can be driven using RF antenna, RF buoy or using a tether. Trialed this summer at ANTX, the inertial system achieved a misclosure of 3.38m after a 2,813m mission with 44 turns.C-2 Innovations said Scripps Institution of Oceanography has had one of its vehicles in use for four years, and USACE North Carolina FRF has a contract to purchase one.Nick Townley, business development, C-2 Innovations, with the Sea Ox (Photo: Rob Howard

 Photo by Michael Fox, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Study: How Much of Corals’ Nutrition Comes From Hunting

microscopic algae living inside of them, but if those algae aren’t creating enough sustenance, corals can use their tentacles to grab and eat tiny prey swimming nearby.A new study from researchers at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), the University of New Mexico, and Scripps Institution of Oceanography is revealing that more of corals’ nutrients come from this sort of hunting than previously expected, information that may help predict the fate of coral reefs as global ocean temperatures rise. The study published Sept. 17, 2019, in the journal Functional Ecology.“When

Crab Comms: "It's not hunger pains, I just want to talk ..."

Scientists Discover New Method of Communication in Crabs: Ghost crabs use structure in their stomach to communicate when agitated.  Researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and the University of California Berkeley have discovered a new method of communication in the Atlantic ghost crab, Ocypode quadrata. The findings were published September 11 in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences.Using a combination of research methods, the scientists found that Atlantic ghost crabs – native to the western Atlantic

Seawater temperature measurements taken at Scripps Pier. (Photo Credit: Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego)

#Oi2020 History

During the summer of 2018, a research team at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego logged in the warmest sea surface temperature at the Ellen Browning Scripps Memorial Pier. According to Scripps, the logged temperature was 78.6 degrees Fahrenheit—the highest since recording began in August 1916—and the same year Scripps researchers began sea-surface temperature and salinity readings at the pier.In 1925, Scripps began taking seafloor water temperature measurements, and the daily collection is still completed by hand and maintained by the institution&rs

(U.S. Navy photo by John F. Williams)

#OI2020: FLIP(ped)

that remain visible after the crew of the Floating Instrument Platform, or FLIP, partially flood the ballast tanks causing the vessel to turn stern first into the ocean. The 355-foot research vessel, owned by the Office of Naval Research and operated by the Marine Physical Laboratory at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at University of California, conducts investigations in a number of fields, including acoustics, oceanography, meteorology and marine mammal observation. Marine Technology Reporter has been commissioned to publish the Official “Oceanology International 50th Anniversary Edition&rd

Weddell Sea polynya, initally 3,700 square miles, 2017. False color NASA satellite image shows ice in blue, clouds in white. (Photo: Scripps Institution of Oceanography)

Robotic Data Help Explain Mysterious Holes

, this was the first time oceanographers had a chance to truly monitor the unexpected gap in Antarctic winter sea ice. It was an opportunity that came about as a result of uncanny timing and a seasoned oceanographer’s knowledge of the sea.A new study co-authored by researchers from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego combines satellite images of the sea ice cover and data collected by robotic drifters and even seals outfitted with sensors to better understand the phenomenon. The research led by the University of Washington (UW) explores why this hole appears

Fetch AZA is a self-calibrating long-life subsea sensor logging node that enables data to be wirelessly extracted via its integrated high speed acoustic modem with a battery life option of up to 10 years. (Photo: D. Chadwell, Scripps Institute of Oceanography (Webb/Chadwell/Nooner US NSF GeoPRISMS project))

Canada's New Observatory Uses 'Seafloor GPS'

.The NCSZO is led by Ocean Networks Canada (ONC)—an initiative of the University of Victoria—and is made possible through cooperation of international partners that include Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) scientists at the Pacific Geoscience Center and David Chadwell from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. More than 20 Sonardyne Fetch subsea sensor logging nodes, which will be deployed in depths ranging from 400 to 2,500 meters of water depth for seven years or longer at a time, will comprise the backbone of the NCSZO.Data will be acquired up to two times a year using a technique called

Image by Pacific Power Group

Scripps Adds New Research Vessel

The Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego has added to its fleet a fourth research vessel, which was constructed by Armstrong Marine. The research vessel Bob and Betty Beyster is expected to launch in mid-April for use in San Diego.Armstrong Marine of Port Angeles, Washington, designed the 42-foot aluminum hulled boat. Pacific Power Group, working closely with Armstrong, fit the vessel with a Volvo Penta IPS 650 propulsion system. This is the first time PPG has mated the IPS configuration with an aluminum hulled boat.“We took a lot of time with the Scripps

Marine Technology Reporter published a supplement to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Oceanology International. Photo: MTR

Oi: Tracking 50 Years of Ocean Innovation

sea were going to feed the world. People were building manned submersibles to go exploring in the deep. Aerospace companies were building submersibles, like Lockheed, North American, Rockwell and Westinghouse.”A lot had happened in the years before, recalls Kevin Hardy, who worked at Scripps Institution of Oceanography from 1972 to 2012, from the invention of pingers and even o-rings – a small component perhaps, but one that brought a break-though by improving seal reliability. The French invention and commercialization of the Aqua-Lung had provided scientists unprecedented access to their

OiA ’19 Conference Chairman, Ralph Rayner, on stage at Catch The Next Wave in San Diego in 2017. Photo: Oceanology International

Oi Americas Set for San Diego

a 2012 expedition to repeat Walsh’s momentous 1960 Mariana Trench dive.Confirmed speakers for Catch The Next Wave include Michael Gernhardt, NASA Astronaut and Manager of Environmental Physiology Laboratory, Johnson Space Center; Douglas Bartlett, Professor of Marine Microbiology, Scripps Institution of Oceanography; and Kelly Benoit-Bird, Senior Scientist, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI).Of central importance to the conference schedule will be a string of technical tracks running across all three days of OiA ’19 and training a spotlight on the topics of Ocean ICT; Unmanned

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