Search Efforts News

The San Juan, before she was lost. Source: Ocean Infinity

Ocean Infinity’s Hunt for the Submarine San Juan

search, however, continued and Ocean Infinity was brought in. Since the firm started operating in 2016, disrupting the autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) space by deploying multiple AUVs from one vessel on search or survey missions, the company has made a name for itself in a number of international search efforts.Ocean Infinity committed to conduct the search operation for up to 60 days and to covers its cost, unless the submarine was found. It deployed its Seabed Constructor vessel with five Hugins. The initial 10-12 days covered three, what were thought key, search areas. But the submarine wasn&rsquo

(Photo: Ocean Infinity)

MH370 Search Comes to a Close

achieved both in terms of the quality of data we’ve produced and the speed with which we covered such a vast area. There simply has not been a subsea search on this scale carried out as efficiently or as effectively ever before,” Plunkett said.Plunkett said his firm is open to renewing search efforts: “We sincerely hope that we will be able to again offer our services in the search for MH370 in future.”A full investigation report into the MH370 disappearance will be released after the latest search efforts are completed

Side Scan Sonar Image of USS Juneau Wreckage on the Sea Floor.  Credit to Paul Allen, the R/V Petrel team.

EdgeTech Sonar Utilized in USS Juneau Discovery

; The USS Juneau, a US Navy light cruiser, was sunk in November 1942 during World War II.  Located in over 4,000 meters of water the historic vessel can be seen in this very clear, low-noise EdgeTech 2205 sonar image.  The amazing image shows the large 2 kilometer swath used during the search efforts. Upon sinking the vessel separated and the forward section can be seen resting hundreds of meters from the bow and stern of the vessel. 

Ocean surface currents around the world. (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio)

The Evolution of Ocean Models

the origin of the flaperon is likely to be to the west rather than southwest of Australia. More importantly, based on our analysis, the chance that the flaperon started its journey from the priority search area is less than 1.3 percent.”   The team had used their model to conclude that search efforts along the priority zone were highly unlikely to achieve success in finding the aircraft. Indeed, with the plane still missing today, the fate of flight MH370 remains a mystery.   [Editor’s note: Since the author’s writing, the search for MH370 has resumed]   Technology

(Photo: Ocean Infinity)

MH370 Report to Be Released after Latest Search Ends

The full investigation report into the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 will be released after the latest search efforts are completed, officials said on Thursday, four years after the aircraft first went missing.   Flight MH370, carrying 239 people onboard, became one of the world's greatest aviation mysteries when it disappeared on its way from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing on March 8, 2014.   Malaysia agreed in January to pay U.S. firm Ocean Infinity up to $70 million if it found the plane during an offshore search effort that is underway and expected to end in June.   T

U.S. Navy file photo of a C-2A Greyhound (U.S. Navy photo by Kenneth Abbate)

Downed US Navy Aircraft Found in Philippine Sea

embarked to the crash site on a contracted salvage vessel, and searched for the aircraft's emergency relocation pinger with the U.S. Navy’s towed pinger locator (TPL-25) system, which uses passive sensors to listen for the pinger's frequency.   After poor weather conditions delayed the search efforts, the team was eventually able to deploy the TPL to optimal search depths of 3,000 feet above the ocean floor December 29, marking the aircraft's location, and then returning to port.   The team will soon return to the site with a side-scan-sonar (SSS) and remote operated vehicle (ROV)

U.S. Navy owned research vessel R/V Atlantis deploys the cable-controlled Undersea Recovery Vehicle (CURV-21) during night operations. The CURV is designed to meet the U.S. Navy's deep ocean recovery requirements down to a maximum depth of 20,000 feet, and was used to support the Argentine Navy's search for the ARA San Juan (S-42). (U.S. Navy photo by Alex Cornell du Houx)

US Exits Search for ARA San Juan

 The U.S. Navy said it has begun to wind down operations as part of the international search for the still-missing Argentine submarine A.R.A. San Juan that vanished in the South Atlantic in mid November.   The U.S. joined the Argentina-led multinational search efforts within 24 hours of learning of the missing submarine on November 17, and is now drawing down, having twice swept the search areas assigned by the Argentine Navy with advanced sensors.   U.S. planning and analytical specialists will continue to support the efforts through data analysis.   At its height, U.S.

(Photo: Paul Allen)

The AUV That Helped Find USS Indianapolis

wide area coverage and can be used for commercial, marine research and defense applications.   The REMUS 6000 was also used in the discovery of Air France Flight 447, a passenger flight that crashed in June 2009, as well as in July 2010 to explore the site of the Titanic sinking – both search efforts led by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI)

Newly discovered B-25 Bomber (Photo: Project Recover)

Missing WW II Bombers Found on the Seafloor

dedication and fervent efforts of everyone associated with Project Recover,” said Dan Friedkin, chairman and CEO of The Friedkin Group and a member of the Project Recover team who provides private funding for the organization. “We are encouraged at the progress that is being made as our search efforts expand and remain committed to locating the resting places of all U.S. servicemen missing since World War II.”   In addition to searching for missing aircraft, Project Recover also conducts archaeological surveys of sites that are known, but not yet documented, like the site of a

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