Subsea Vehicles News

Saab Seaeye’s Sabretooth it in its test tank (Photo: Saab Seaeye)

Saab Seaeye eRobotics Campaign Wins UTC Award

Technologies (OPT) to jointly develop and market solutions for AUV and ROV charging and communications systems, using a buoy-based wave energy generator for power and communications. Its Sabertooth is also being used by Eni, which is trialing a wave power buoy to demonstrate the ability to charge subsea vehicles. Later this year, a Sabertooth, adapted by Modus Seabed Intervention, based in England, will also be demonstrated as a resident vehicle on a UK offshore wind farm.“Subsea resident vehicles able to remain on the seabed for long periods, available for inspection and maintenance operations

Thyssenkrupp’s MUM concept. Image from Thyssenkrupp.

Robotics: The Next Gen in Subsea Vehicles

to enter the underwater domain is growing fast. The concepts vary, from underwater autonomous motherships able to carry an array of payloads over long distances to swarms of drop deployed ocean bottom nodes that can find their way to pre-programmed locations.At energy:connected, as the Oslo-based Subsea Valley cluster and annual conference is now called, some of these concepts were outlined, including those from two Norwegian technology firms and Germany’s Thyssenkrupp, a firm more used to designing naval submarine systems.  uSEA unveils uLARSOne, Norwegian technology start-up uSEA, is

(Photo: Modus Seabed Intervention)

ForeCoast Software to Optimize Modus H-AUV

Subsea vehicles and services provider Modus Seabed Intervention has selected JBA Consulting’s operational management software ForeCoast Marine to help optimize the operation of its hybrid autonomous underwater vehicles (H-AUV).The H-AUV capability is part of a development program by Modus, to introduce advanced and disruptive technologies across its range of services. The UK-based company has selected ForeCoast Marine to optimize the operation of the H-AUV, in an effort to maximize the returns from this investment and provide its clients the most operationally efficient solutions.ForeCoast

Dan Scoville (Photo: OceanGate)

OceanGate Hires Scoville

OceanGate Inc, a provider of manned submersible services has hired veteran subsea engineer, Dan Scoville, to join their team as Director of Systems Integration and Marine Operations. Scoville brings with him a diverse background in subsea vehicles, inspection, and engineering as well as a passion for deep sea discovery and exploration.As Director of Systems Integration and Marine Operations Scoville will oversee operational engineering for OceanGate’s fleet of three manned submersibles. Additionally, he will oversee all marine operations and play a critical role in the continued development

(L-R) Matt Kingsland, NOC and Paul Griffiths, Sonardyne, with the SPRINT-Nav 700 at the NOC robotics lab during Ocean Business (Photo: Sonardyne)

Sonardyne’s SPRINT-Nav 700 selected for new under-ice AUV

a high accuracy intelligent pressure sensor into a single housing, making it one of the smallest combined inertial navigation instruments on the market. SPRINT-Nav’s tight integration of all the raw sensor data at a low level provides unprecedented navigational performance and precision for subsea vehicles. Consequently SPRINT-Nav has consistently outperformed competing systems in trials carried out for a number of customers. The SPRINT-Nav 700, selected by the NOC, is equipped with the highest performance available sensors, including Honeywell ring laser gyros and accelerometers, and has a conservativ

(Photo: Forum Subsea Technologies)

DOF Subsea Orders Three Forum ROVS

to be delivered to the market. Forum has engineered the ROV footprint to suit the current specifications required by DOF Subsea and their prospective clients. These latest Perry ROVs are powered by a 150HP main and auxiliary hydraulic system.Kevin Taylor, Forum Subsea Technologies vice president of subsea vehicles said, “In total, DOF Subsea has more than 60 of Forum’s ROVs in their global fleet. As the market continues to pick up from a sustained downturn, it is reassuring to see this ongoing confidence in our systems which meet the operational resilience and safety standards our clients

Martin McDonald, Senior Vice President, ROV Division, Oceaneering International.
Courtesy of Oceaneering International

One-on-One with Martin McDonald, SVP, ROV Division, Oceaneering

locations on rotations, and this is a new way of working.To accomplish this, our equipment has to be reliable. We are investing significant energy and resources into improving systems reliability, along with component and material qualifications, so that today’s ROVs can become resident subsea vehicles that can be controlled remotely and operated with minimum to zero maintenance.What do you count as the most important technology, or technology trend, that has made ROVs more efficient and cost effective?Software and control systems – the two go hand-in-hand. They allow us to optimize

“We are moving autonomous technologies into vehicles that have always been "remotely operated" or even manned to realize more efficiency and capability.  We are really blurring the lines between "ROV" and "AUV" and minimizing the technical difference between manned and unmanned. ”
Ben Kinnaman, CEO, Greensea Systems, Inc."

Subsea: The Future of Unmanned Vehicles

Subsea vehicles of every shape and size have evolved mightily in the past few years, as a confluence of communication, electronic and autonomy technologies have conspired to increase the accuracy, duration and efficiency of such systems. MTR tapped a few key industry leaders to discuss the path ahead.“I think there are two current market drivers forcing the industry to develop and adopt technologies that make subsea vehicles more efficient and effective,” said Ben Kinnaman, CEO, Greensea Systems, Inc. “First, the market really wants to use miniature vehicles and realize the long-promis

Photo courtesy of SEAmagine Hydrospace Corporation

Subsea Electrification: Subsea Power Evolves

batteries that are safe, smart, provide more capacity, deliver more power, are smaller and lighter, longer life, and highly reliable.For years, most electrical subsea operations were tethered, powered by umbilicals, which are costly, constraining, and require significant lead time.  Untethered subsea vehicles used sealed lead acid, which made them heavy and bulky, or batteries contained within 1 atmosphere pressure vessels, which can be expensive and heavy.Six years ago, Southwest Electronic Energy Corp’s SeaSafe battery brought revolutionary changes to the market. The first commercial pressure-tole

(Photo: Forum Energy Technologies)

Forum Bags Mojave ROV Deal

inshore market and found the Mojave suitable for the purpose because it is a truly mobile system which is very powerful for its size.”ESEA Submarine AS was established during 2016 by Stranden, an industry veteran with more than 30 years’ experience of working with ROVs.Malcolm Johnston, subsea vehicles sales manager, said, “The Mojave is a well-balanced vehicle that is highly-responsive and powerful for its size. It has a variety of tooling options which makes it an ideal fit for ESEA Submarine with the range of work it will be expected to perform.&rdquo

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