Atlantic Ocean News

THE PAP Observatory buoy on the ocean surface (Photo: NOC)

Scientists to Investigate Human Impacts in the Ocean

An international group of scientists aboard the high-tech research vessel RRS James Cook left Southampton on May 19 for the Porcupine Abyssal Plain – Sustained Observatory (PAP-SO) in the northeast Atlantic Ocean on an expedition that aims to answer fundamental questions about how potential environmental and ecological stressors are influencing the open ocean from surface to seabed.The researchers will track the flow of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide from the air into the surface ocean, and the eventual fate of this carbon in the ocean depths. They’ll also make detailed measurements of

US Denies Atlantic Seismic G&G Permits

The U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) has denied six pending geophysical and geological (G&G) permit applications to conduct airgun seismic surveys in the Mid- and South Atlantic Planning Areas of the Atlantic Ocean.    In announcing its decision BOEM cited a number of factors, including a diminished need for additional seismic survey information because the Atlantic Program Area has been removed from the 2017-2022 Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Leasing Program.      “In the present circumstances and guided by an abundance of caution, we believe

Randall Luthi (Photo: NOIA)

Op/Ed: A Nail in the Coffin for US Offshore Exploration

exploration in the Atlantic. Not only does this decision conflict with BOEM’s own scientific conclusion that seismic surveys are environmentally safe, it is self-fulfilling rhetoric, basing its reasoning on President Obama’s recent withdrawal of 3.8 million acres in the north and mid-Atlantic Ocean.    This decision continues the Obama administration’s dismissal of scientifically-backed offshore policies and ignores the fact that seismic and other geophysical surveys have been safely conducted offshore in the U.S. and around the world for more than 50 years. What&rsquo

Left to right: Craig McLean of NOAA presents Fugro’s Edward Saade with a commemorative plaque in formal commendation of the company’s leadership in advancing global ocean mapping (Photo: Fugro)

NOAA Honors Fugro

the private sector for a larger public good.”Fugro’s contributions to the Nippon Foundation-GEBCO Seabed 2030 project will be used to inform global policy, improve sustainable use and advance scientific research. Additionally, crowd sourced bathymetry data acquired by Fugro in the North Atlantic Ocean is feeding into a regional initiative known as the Galway Statement on Atlantic Ocean Cooperation. Signed in 2013 between the U.S., Canada and the European Union, the statement provides a means for understanding the shared waters of the North Atlantic for scientific, environmental and economic

Glider data will help forecasters make better predictions this hurricane season (Photo: NOAA)

Ocean Gliders: The New Storm Chasers

Unmanned ocean gliders go deep to help improve hurricane forecastsA fleet of 15 autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV), or gliders, will be deployed to collect important ocean data in the Caribbean Sea and tropical Atlantic Ocean that could prove useful to forecasters this hurricane season.NOAA, the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System and university partners will begin deploying the torpedo-shaped, remotely-operated, battery-powered gliders from vessels off Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands in mid-July. Ten of the gliders will come from the U.S. Navy, and the others from NOAA.The gliders will

Photo: NOAA

Arctic Seas a 'Dead End' for Floating Plastic

The Arctic is a dead end for floating plastic waste dumped in the Atlantic Ocean off Europe and the United States and swept north by ocean currents to a polar graveyard, scientists said on Wednesday.   Levels of plastic found east of Greenland and in the Barents Sea off Norway and Russia were far higher than expected for the sparsely populated regions, according to the report showing how man-made pollution extends even to remote parts of the globe.   "The northeastern Atlantic sector of the Arctic Ocean appeared as a dead end for the surface transport of plastic pollution," the

© sdecoret / Adobe Stock

All Eyes on Ireland

Survey of Ireland operate INFOMAR, the largest civilian seabed mapping program in the world. Ireland is also significantly involved in ocean observation and seabed mapping initiatives in an EU and broader international context: in particular, the Galway Statement, signed in 2013, established a formal Atlantic Ocean Research Alliance (AORA) between the EU and its Member States, the US and Canada and other partner countries that builds on existing initiatives and programs to increase cohesion and coordination of ocean research cooperation.   One of the priority areas that has been identified is seabed

© Sergej Ljashenko / Adobe Stock

Rising Temperatures Threaten Mediterranean Sea Species

.   He added that about a quarter of mankind's CO2 emissions are absorbed by the oceans, making the water more acidic.   Gattuso said that plankton tends to migrate north in order to maintain an optimum temperature, but that is not possible in the Mediterranean, which is connected to the Atlantic Ocean only via the narrow Strait of Gibraltar.   "It's a dead-end here, so species could disappear," Gattuso said, noting a particular threat to the "posidonia oceanica" seagrass, known locally as Mediterranean tapeweed, which produces oxygen and forms an important fish habitat

Image: TDI-Brooks International

Deepwater Atlantic Habitats Study Commissioned

 TDI-Brooks International, Inc. said it has been awarded an interagency five year, multimillion dollar study focusing on the exploration and investigation of deepwater biological communities located in U.S. federal waters of the northwest Atlantic Ocean, potentially including offshore Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia.   The study, entitled “Deepwater Atlantic Habitats II: Continued Atlantic Research and Exploration in Deepwater Ecosystems with Focus on Coral, Canyon and Seep Communities,” is being funded by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM)

(Photo: NOAA)

NOAA Teams up with Paul Allen for Deep Ocean Observation

Argo buoys to probe ocean currents that drive weather and climate   Microsoft co-founder and philanthropist Paul G. Allen and NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory will deploy a large array of new deep ocean floats to expand ocean observations in a key area of the western South Atlantic Ocean.   These instruments, called Deep Argo floats, can collect data down to nearly four miles deep, and promise to lead scientists to a better understanding of how the bottom half of the ocean may influence long term weather, climate and sea level rise.   Paul G. Allen Philanthropies

3D model of a subsea dry mate connector (Photo: Rovco)

Rovco Trials 3D Visualization Tech

. There are many applications for ROV 3D visualization, however we expect it to be used most frequently for condition monitoring of subsea assets, as well as for damage, corrosion or decommissioning surveys.”   Located 16km from the north coast of Cornwall, at the eastern edge of the Atlantic Ocean, the Wave Hub site offers four cable connection points for testing offshore renewable energy technology as well as purpose built and commissioned grid connected infrastructure.   Julius Besterman, head of engineering and operations at Wave Hub, said, “Periodic subsea inspection is

Photo: TE Connectivity

TE Subcom Supplies MAREA Submarine Cable System

Facebook, Microsoft, and TE SubCom, a TE Connectivity Ltd. company and an industry pioneer in undersea communications technology, has announced that TE SubCom has been named the system supply partner for the new MAREA submarine cable across the Atlantic Ocean.   TE SubCom has completed the route survey and begun manufacture of the system at its facility in Newington, New Hampshire. The parties are on track to begin laying cable using TE SubCom’s state-of-the-art cable installation ships next year, with a scheduled completion date of October 2017.   As announced by Facebook and

Image courtesy of Prof Bob Stone, Birmingham University

Silicon Sensing Supports Mayflower Autonomous Ship Project

On September 6, 1620, the Mayflower set sail for America with 102 intrepid early settlers bound for the new land across the Atlantic Ocean, a perilous journey which took 66 days to reach what we now know as Cape Cod, Mass.   To mark the 400th anniversary of this undertaking, a team led by U.S.-owned but Plymouth-based firm MSubs, and including Plymouth University and charitable research foundation ProMare, has initiated a plan to design and build a fully autonomous ship to make the same Atlantic crossing, completely unmanned, in 2020. During the voyage, the Mayflower Autonomous Ship –

Barry Macleod, managing director Photo Bibby Offshore

Bibby Offshore Wins Shell Subsea Deal

Bibby Offshore, the leading subsea services provider to the oil and gas industry, has this year been awarded two contracts from Shell to provide inspection services on assets in the Corrib Natural Gas field in the North Atlantic Ocean.   The first contract, completed in June this year, saw Bibby Offshore’s construction support vessel Olympic Ares - equipped with Quantum Work Class and SeaEye Cougar Inspection Class ROVs - perform subsea inspections 83km off the North West coast of Ireland, in water depths of approximately 360m.   The 40 day campaign involved pipeline survey inspectio

A drilling ship Polar Pioneer in the Chukchi Sea, August 2015 (Photo: Mark Fink / Shell)

Obama Administration Bars New Oil, Gas Exploration off Alaska

that it had been forced to divert resources, including a vessel that fought cocaine trafficking, to keep operations in the region safe. (http://reut.rs/2g4yHSW)   Environmentalists applauded the new lease plan, which built on a similar decision in March when the government removed much of the Atlantic ocean from oil and gas leasing for five years.   "This is excellent news for our oceans, from the Arctic to the Atlantic," said Jacqueline Savitz, deputy vice president for U.S. campaigns of Oceana, an international advocacy group.     (Reporting by Timothy Gardner; editing

(Illustration by Natalie Renier, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

Atlantic Ocean Circulation at Weakest Point in 1,600 Years

Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI). If the system continues to weaken, it could disrupt weather patterns from the United States and Europe to the African Sahel, and cause more rapid increase in sea level on the U.S. East Coast.When it comes to regulating global climate, the circulation of the Atlantic Ocean plays a key role. The constantly moving system of deep-water circulation, sometimes referred to as the Global Ocean Conveyor Belt, sends warm, salty Gulf Stream water to the North Atlantic where it releases heat to the atmosphere and warms Western Europe. The cooler water then sinks to great

Howard Woodcock, Chief Executive, Bibby Offshore

Bibby Offshore wins Shell Contract

; The company has also collaborated with a third party operator who will carry out trenching operations after the initial workscope is complete.     In early 2016, Bibby Offshore provided construction and inspection services for Shell on assets in the Corrib Natural Gas field in the North Atlantic Ocean, successfully completing two significant contracts. 

Marine Technology Magazine Cover Oct 2018 - Ocean Observation: Gliders, Buoys & Sub-Surface Networks

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