Atmospheric Research News

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The Oceans Are Warming Faster than Expected

are less influenced by year-to-year variations in the weather. It can take more than 1,000 years for deep ocean temperatures to adjust to changes at the surface."The deep ocean reflects the climate of the deep and uncertain past," Kevin Trenberth, of the U.S. National Center for Atmospheric Research and a co-author of Thursday's study, told Reuters.Among effects, extra warmth can reduce oxygen in the oceans and damages coral reefs that are nurseries for fish, the scientists said. Warmer seas release more moisture that can stoke more powerful storms.Warmer ocean water also raises sea

Participants at The Nippon Foundation-GEBCO Seabed 2030 project regional mapping meeting for the Atlantic and Indian Oceans gathered in Palisades, New York. (Photo: The Nippon Foundation-GEBCO Seabed)

First Nippon Foundation-GEBCO Seabed 2030 Project Meeting

Foundation-GEBCO Seabed 2030 Project divides responsibility for data assembly and coordination in different areas of the ocean between four Regional Centers. These centers are located at The Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI), Germany, covering the Southern Ocean; The National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA), New Zealand, covering the South and West Pacific Ocean; The Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, USA, covering the Atlantic and Indian Oceans; and Stockholm University, Sweden, in partnership with the University of New Hampshire, USA, for the Arctic and North Pacific

Participants at the first Arctic, Antarctic & North Pacific mapping meeting for The Nippon Foundation-GEBCO Seabed 2030 Project, held at Stockholm University, October 8-10 (Image: The Nippon Foundation / GEBCO)

Seabed 2030 Meeting Held in Stockholm

world’s ocean floor by 2030, The Nippon Foundation-GEBCO Seabed 2030 Project divides responsibility for different areas of the ocean between four RDACCs. These centers are located at The Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI), Germany, covering the Southern Ocean; The National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA), Wellington, New Zealand, covering the South and West Pacific Ocean; The Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, U.S., covering the Atlantic and Indian Oceans; and Stockholm University, Sweden, in partnership with the University of New Hampshire, U.S., for the Arctic

Left to right: Craig McLean of NOAA presents Fugro’s Edward Saade with a commemorative plaque in formal commendation of the company’s leadership in advancing global ocean mapping (Photo: Fugro)

NOAA Honors Fugro

briefing with Fugro and NOAA about The Nippon Foundation-GEBCO Seabed 2030 Project, a global initiative to map the world’s oceans by the year 2030.Given that more than 80 percent of the world’s oceans remains unexplored and unmapped, NOAA’s Assistant Administrator for Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, Craig McLean, underscored the importance of the role of the commercial sector in meeting the project’s ambitious timeline and highlighted Fugro’s involvement to that end. Over the past year, the company has contributed more than 65,000 square kilometers of high-resolution crowd

Sonardyne’s Ranger 2 will support the RRS Sir David Attenborough’s work by enabling science teams to precisely monitor the position of underwater systems including Boaty McBoatface. (Image: Sonardyne)

Sonardyne Ranger 2 for RRS Sir David Attenborough

, the RRS David Attenborough will be one of the most advanced vessels of its type when it enters service in 2019. Measuring 128 meters long and 24 meters wide, the new ship will have a range of 19,000 nautical miles and be able to accommodate up to 60 scientists engaged in ocean, seafloor and atmospheric research.    Sonardyne’s Ranger 2 will support the RRS Sir David Attenborough’s work by enabling science teams to precisely monitor the position of underwater systems deployed from the vessel. Sonardyne’s exclusive wideband acoustic signal technology and 6G (sixth generation)

Small, deep-water Alaska green sponge (Image: NOAA Fisheries)

A Sea Sponge could Help Battle Cancer

led him to Stone.   After the green sponge was discovered, it quickly became a focal point of this global collaboration. Stone and Hamann worked with Michelle Kelly, to name and identify Latrunculia austini. Kelly is a world expert on sponges and works at the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research in New Zealand.   Meanwhile, Hamann and his team determined that the sponge “covers unique and unprecedented chemical space. The structures of the molecules are not related to anything you would find on land or even in tropical shallow-water marine environments.”  

Donald Trump (Photo: Gage Skidmore)

Climate Scientists Adjust as Trump Builds Team of Oil Allies

a new administration skeptical of climate change and committed to expanding oil drilling and coal mining.   "I think it is maybe really necessary to refocus what you are doing and how you are labeling it," said Andreas Prein, a scientist at the federally funded National Center for Atmospheric Research, who previously had changed the term "climate change" in a project for the oil industry and expects such linguistic twists to proliferate.   Trump has questioned whether climate change exists and has raised the possibility of withdrawing U.S. support for a global accord to

RockBLOCK has been integrated on specially developed wave buoys deployed on to sea ice floes in the Arctic and Antarctic by NIWA. (Photo: Rock Seven)

‘Small Satcom’ Aids Polar Climate Research

oil and gas and mining.   Rock Seven is the manufacturer of RockBLOCK, a tiny device that can be integrated with most computing platforms to provide global data transmission capabilities even at the Poles. The system is currently being used by a team from the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research – New Zealand (NIWA) to measure the effects of storm waves on sea ice. RockBLOCK has been integrated on specially developed wave buoys deployed on to sea ice floes in the Arctic and Antarctic by NIWA. The system transmits GPS position and signal strength data from the buoys every hour

Photo: NOAA

A Game-changer for Flood Forecasting

and generates several additional water variables, such as soil moisture, runoff, stream velocity, and other parameters to produce a more comprehensive picture of water behavior across the country.”   The underlying technology for the model was developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). NOAA developed and implemented the model along with NCAR, the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Sciences, the National Science Foundation (NSF) and federal Integrated Water Resources Science and Services Consortium partners

Image: IOOS

IOOS Awards $31 Mln for Ocean Observation

.   IOOS said the funds, which are to be distributed primarily as five-year cooperative agreements, are augmented by contributions from other federal offices and agencies, as well as outside groups including: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Office Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR), NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program (OAP), the National Weather Service (NWS), NOAA Fisheries (NMFS), NOAA’s Office of Coast Survey (OCS), NOAA’s Office for Coastal Management, NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), NOAA’s Satellite and

Research ice breaker Polarstern Photo AWI

Research Vessel Polarstern Returns to Bremerhaven

choosing the easiest route through the ice.  This expedition into the southern Weddell Sea which Followed by before to eight-week geoscientific trip to the Drake Passage the Polarstern made ​​its way back to Bremerhaven o n is 10 Apr il from Punta Arenas, Chile, where its focus on what atmospheric research. Following a stopover in the Canary Islands, 39 scientific expedition participants, 25 of splat are participating in a training course on echo sound system, currently join the ship's crew.  The Polarstern will be in the Lloyd shipyard until mid June for standard maintenance and repair

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