Atmospheric Research News

Drillers working on the rig floor of IODP Expedition 372. © Phil Barnes, NIWA

NIWA: Slow-slip Earthquake Research Gains Momentum

fault in hopes of learning more about slow-slip earthquakes in subduction zones worldwide.The International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) expeditions to the Hikurangi subduction zone off the east coast of the North Island were jointly led by researchers from the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA), GNS Science, the University of Texas, and the University of Auckland. This research marks the first time scientists have studied and directly sampled rocks from the source region of slow-slip events by drilling into the ocean floor.Slow-slip events resemble regular earthquakes, but

Atlantic Shores Offshore Wind Installs Wind LiDAR in New Jersey

with Rutgers, we are helping to ensure New Jersey is a leader in a thriving, new green economy.”“Offshore wind is a key piece of New Jersey’s green future, taking advantage of one of our greatest, untapped sources of renewable energy,” said Joseph Brodie, Director of Atmospheric Research at RUCOOL. “Public-private partnerships like the one we’ve built with Atlantic Shores Offshore Wind -- sharing data, knowledge and resources -- enable all of our efforts to go farther. Through this collaboration, we are bringing New Jersey one step closer to a future powered

#Oi2020 History

In 1995, NOAA began construction of the Ronald H. Brown, which is currently the largest in the agency’s fleet. Following its launch in 1997, this oceanographic and atmospheric research vessel has traveled from its Charleston, SC, home port to the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans. At a length of 274 feet, Ronald H. Brown can displace more than 3,200 tons and is outfitted with a suite of instruments for collecting and assessing scientific data above and below the ocean surface. This allows NOAA’s office of Marine and Aviation Operations to simultaneously measure the atmosphere and the

© Ivan Kurmyshov / Adobe Stock

The Oceans Are Warming Faster than Expected

are less influenced by year-to-year variations in the weather. It can take more than 1,000 years for deep ocean temperatures to adjust to changes at the surface."The deep ocean reflects the climate of the deep and uncertain past," Kevin Trenberth, of the U.S. National Center for Atmospheric Research and a co-author of Thursday's study, told Reuters.Among effects, extra warmth can reduce oxygen in the oceans and damages coral reefs that are nurseries for fish, the scientists said. Warmer seas release more moisture that can stoke more powerful storms.Warmer ocean water also raises sea

Participants at The Nippon Foundation-GEBCO Seabed 2030 project regional mapping meeting for the Atlantic and Indian Oceans gathered in Palisades, New York. (Photo: The Nippon Foundation-GEBCO Seabed)

First Nippon Foundation-GEBCO Seabed 2030 Project Meeting

Foundation-GEBCO Seabed 2030 Project divides responsibility for data assembly and coordination in different areas of the ocean between four Regional Centers. These centers are located at The Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI), Germany, covering the Southern Ocean; The National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA), New Zealand, covering the South and West Pacific Ocean; The Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, USA, covering the Atlantic and Indian Oceans; and Stockholm University, Sweden, in partnership with the University of New Hampshire, USA, for the Arctic and North Pacific

Participants at the first Arctic, Antarctic & North Pacific mapping meeting for The Nippon Foundation-GEBCO Seabed 2030 Project, held at Stockholm University, October 8-10 (Image: The Nippon Foundation / GEBCO)

Seabed 2030 Meeting Held in Stockholm

world’s ocean floor by 2030, The Nippon Foundation-GEBCO Seabed 2030 Project divides responsibility for different areas of the ocean between four RDACCs. These centers are located at The Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI), Germany, covering the Southern Ocean; The National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA), Wellington, New Zealand, covering the South and West Pacific Ocean; The Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, U.S., covering the Atlantic and Indian Oceans; and Stockholm University, Sweden, in partnership with the University of New Hampshire, U.S., for the Arctic

Left to right: Craig McLean of NOAA presents Fugro’s Edward Saade with a commemorative plaque in formal commendation of the company’s leadership in advancing global ocean mapping (Photo: Fugro)

NOAA Honors Fugro

briefing with Fugro and NOAA about The Nippon Foundation-GEBCO Seabed 2030 Project, a global initiative to map the world’s oceans by the year 2030.Given that more than 80 percent of the world’s oceans remains unexplored and unmapped, NOAA’s Assistant Administrator for Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, Craig McLean, underscored the importance of the role of the commercial sector in meeting the project’s ambitious timeline and highlighted Fugro’s involvement to that end. Over the past year, the company has contributed more than 65,000 square kilometers of high-resolution crowd

Sonardyne’s Ranger 2 will support the RRS Sir David Attenborough’s work by enabling science teams to precisely monitor the position of underwater systems including Boaty McBoatface. (Image: Sonardyne)

Sonardyne Ranger 2 for RRS Sir David Attenborough

, the RRS David Attenborough will be one of the most advanced vessels of its type when it enters service in 2019. Measuring 128 meters long and 24 meters wide, the new ship will have a range of 19,000 nautical miles and be able to accommodate up to 60 scientists engaged in ocean, seafloor and atmospheric research.    Sonardyne’s Ranger 2 will support the RRS Sir David Attenborough’s work by enabling science teams to precisely monitor the position of underwater systems deployed from the vessel. Sonardyne’s exclusive wideband acoustic signal technology and 6G (sixth generation)

Small, deep-water Alaska green sponge (Image: NOAA Fisheries)

A Sea Sponge could Help Battle Cancer

led him to Stone.   After the green sponge was discovered, it quickly became a focal point of this global collaboration. Stone and Hamann worked with Michelle Kelly, to name and identify Latrunculia austini. Kelly is a world expert on sponges and works at the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research in New Zealand.   Meanwhile, Hamann and his team determined that the sponge “covers unique and unprecedented chemical space. The structures of the molecules are not related to anything you would find on land or even in tropical shallow-water marine environments.”  

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