Caribbean Sea News

Concept design of Fabien Cousteau's underwater base, Proteus. Credit: Yves Béhar and fuseproject

This Underwater Base Could Become the ISS of the Ocean

will have access to a laboratory, a medical bay, and even a hydroponic greenhouse where they can grow fresh food — assuming Proteus comes to fruition.Cousteau told Forbes he expects it'll take three years and $135 million to build the underwater base 60 feet below the surface of the Caribbean Sea, just off the coast of Curaçao.If he can raise the money to do that, the facility will then cost about $3 million per year to run, but he anticipates renting space on the facility to universities and private companies, which will help offset that expense.For now, though, he's just

Dr. Cleopatra Doumbia-Henry, president of the World Maritime University (WMU) in Sweden. © Christoffer Lomfors

Ocean Influencer: Dr. Cleopatra Doumbia-Henry, President, World Maritime University (WMU)

equality in ocean-related fields. She is a distinguished academic in the field of international law, justice drives her motivation for social and environmental change on a global scale.Born and raised in the Commonwealth of Dominica, Doumbia-Henry grew up surrounded by maritime culture, where the Caribbean Sea and the shipping industry have a large impact on the economy and daily life. Her professional interests and successes can be credited to both her island upbringing and paternal guidance and support. Cited as a source of inspiration, Doumbia-Henry’s father was a farmer, educator, and politician

NOAA scientist operates an autonomous surface vehicle in the Port of Gulfport, Miss., during the Commander, Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command’s Advanced Naval Technology Exercise on Nov. 6, 2019, to test and evaluate new maritime technologies. (CNMOC)

U.S. Navy, NOAA Strike Deal to Fast-Track Unmanned Maritime Systems

, academia and private enterprise. A timely example of how NOAA and the Navy are working together with unmanned systems is the ocean unmanned glider project to improve hurricane prediction. For the third year, NOAA, the Navy, academia and private industry are deploying unmanned ocean gliders from the Caribbean Sea to the eastern seaboard that demonstrate unmanned maritime system’s observations can improve hurricane intensity forecasts.The new pact formalizes the Commercial Engagement Through Ocean Technology Act of 2018, that directs NOAA to coordinate with the Navy on a wide range of functions including

(Photo: NOAA)

Forecasters Expect Busy 2020 Atlantic Hurricane Season

the Atlantic this year. El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) conditions are expected to either remain neutral or to trend toward La Nina, meaning there will not be an El Nino present to suppress hurricane activity. Also, warmer-than-average sea surface temperatures in the tropical Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea, coupled with reduced vertical wind shear, weaker tropical Atlantic trade winds, and an enhanced west African monsoon all increase the likelihood for an above-normal Atlantic hurricane season. Similar conditions have been producing more active seasons since the current high-activity era began

Photo: SBG Systems

SBG Systems' INS Chosen for Shom Fleet

products and services for public policies on the sea and the coast. The fleet used by Shom is based in Brest and is composed of eleven boats, including seven speedboats, and three 59-meter long BH2 survey vessels. They operate on shallow and deep water in France, Africa, the Indian Ocean and in the Caribbean Sea. Shom also uses a fleet based in New Caledonia composed of two boats, one speedboat and a buoy-laying Vessel used part of the time for hydrographic surveys.When it came to renewing the fleet of inertial navigation systems (INS), the Shom looked at INS complying with IHO standards for bathymetric

Photo by Paul Humann, copyright Grouper Moon Project

Conservation for Endangered Reef Fish Yields Results

more than 1,000 individuals and the species is currently listed as critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.In 2001, an aggregation of around 7,000 Nassau Grouper was discovered near Little Cayman, the smallest of the three islands located south of Cuba in the Caribbean Sea. In 2003, the subsequent rapid overfishing of the aggregation drove the Cayman Islands Government to enact aggressive management policies by banning fishing at aggregation sites during the spawning season. Through the Grouper Moon Project, the Cayman Islands Department of Environment (CI-DOE)

Glider data will help forecasters make better predictions this hurricane season (Photo: NOAA)

Ocean Gliders: The New Storm Chasers

Unmanned ocean gliders go deep to help improve hurricane forecastsA fleet of 15 autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV), or gliders, will be deployed to collect important ocean data in the Caribbean Sea and tropical Atlantic Ocean that could prove useful to forecasters this hurricane season.NOAA, the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System and university partners will begin deploying the torpedo-shaped, remotely-operated, battery-powered gliders from vessels off Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands in mid-July. Ten of the gliders will come from the U.S. Navy, and the others from NOAA.The gliders will

Harvey, Irma, Maria and Nate Retired

injured preparing for the storm, during it or in its aftermath. Hurricane Maria ravaged the island of Dominica as a category 5 on September 19, and later devastated Puerto Rico as a high-end category 4 hurricane. It also inflicted serious damage on some of the other islands of the northeastern Caribbean Sea. Maria is the third costliest hurricane in U.S. history, behind Harvey and Katrina. Maria caused 31 direct deaths with 34 missing in Dominica, and two direct deaths in Guadeloupe. In Puerto Rico, the death toll stands at 65, which includes an unknown number of indirect deaths. Hurricane

Photo: NOAA

'Above-normal' Hurricane Season Forecasted

miles per hour, Friedman said.   A normal season consists of an average of 12 tropical storms and six hurricanes, including three considered major.   U.S. residents along the Gulf Coast and Atlantic Coast could be affected by the storms, as well as Mexico and the nations surrounding the Caribbean Sea.   The figures for 2017 are higher than last year's prediction of 10 to 16 storms, with four to eight likely to become hurricanes.   A weak or non-existent El Nino, which typically suppresses the development of Atlantic hurricanes, and warmer sea surface temperatures factor into

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