Explorer News

Image: Ulstein

Aurora Expeditions Christens Sylvia Earle

Expeditions, the luxury cruise company that offers services to Antarctica and Arctic,  will build a second expedition ship, the Sylvia Earle, scheduled to debut in October 2021.The 126-passenger vessel  named ‘Sylvia Earle’, to honor the renowned marine biologist, oceanographer and explorer.The order comes shortly after the Australia-based company introduced its first new expedition ship in 2019, the Greg Mortimer, named for the Australian mountaineer and Aurora’s founder.The new ship is one of the vessels in owner, SunStone Ships’, INFINITY class. Constructed at CMHI,

Solwara 1 project seabed mining tools. Courtesy Nautilus Minerals.

Will 2020 be the year for Subsea Mining?

Anyone who has been around the Offshore Oil and Gas or the Marine industries for long has heard of plans for mining various minerals located on or just below the seafloor. In fact, when Howard Hughes built the Glomar Explorer in 1972, the cover story for its true mission – recovering a Soviet submarine - was that the rig would be used to mine manganese nodules from the deep ocean floor.  This cover story was so effective that it had the unintended consequence of stirring great interest in ocean mining among offshore companies and the general public.In the years since, there has been a great

Pic: Marine Components International (MCI)

MCI Signs EchoPilot Deal

only offer an eight times depth ratio, equivalent to just 40 meters ahead for the same five meters of depth,” he added.Scott said the FLS 3D will strengthen the range of products MCI offers to the market for larger yachts.“MCI sees great potential when this kit is fitted to the tenders of explorer-type vessels,” he said. “Having a real-time 3D display of the seabed some distance ahead will prove invaluable when cruising well off the beaten track. Another innovation of the FLS 3D is the one second refresh rate. This rapid updating of the graphic display allows a vessel to navigate

Dr. Catherine Warner, Director, NATO CMRE. Photo: CMRE

Interview: Dr. Catherine Warner, Director, NATO CMRE

have some experience in this area.Do you make your own vehicles and platforms, or do you buy systems on the open market?We have commercially available buoyancy glider UUVs and USVs, and we’re doing all kinds of work with them.  We have underwater vehicles such as the Bluefin 21, Ocean Explorer and the Remus.  With all of our various vehicles, we get them and then we take them apart and put all our stuff in them.So your engineers customize them ...Our engineering department are definitely the crown jewels.  The scientists come up with the ideas, but the engineers actually do

Photo courtesy of MacArtney UK Ltd

MacArtney Sponsors UK MATE ROV Team

, Tennessee. Specific tasks will include ensuring public safety with regard to the Boone Hydroelectric Dam, maintaining healthy waterways through the monitoring of water quality and preserving history through the recovery of Civil War-era UXO. Before the launch and operations, each team must complete Explorer, Ranger, Navigator and Scout challenges.The first team from England to qualify for the prestigious MATE ROV competition, Avalon Underwater Robotics, comprises of 17 multidisciplinary students from the Faculty of Engineering. Representing Mechanical Engineering, Automatic Control and Systems Engineering

Photo: David Vargas/Lindblad Expeditions

MTR100: #3 Sven Lindblad, Lindblad Expeditions

The editors of Marine Technology Reporter are pleased to share that Sven Lindblad, Lindblad Expeditions, is #3 in the 14th Annual "MTR100". The full  electronic edition of Marine Technology Reporter is available at https://magazines.marinelink.com/nwm/MarineTechnology/201907/.Intrepid explorer and wildlife photographer Sven Lindblad blazed the trail for environmentally sensitive travelers to Antarctica on Lindblad Expedition’s fleet of cruise ships with National Geographic.You can tell a lot about a man by whom his heroes are, whether famous athletes, virtuoso musicians, brave warriors

Photo courtesy of Viewport3

3D Models of Newly Discovered US WWII Sub

Aberdeen-based subsea 3D scanning specialists, Viewport3, have been collaborating with an eminent international explorer, Tim Taylor to process pioneering underwater 3D scans on the bow and stern of a US submarine which was lost in 1942.Viewport3 were contracted by Tim Taylor, CEO of New-York based Tiburon Subsea Services and founder of Ocean Outreach Inc, as part of his ongoing “Lost 52 Project”, which he states, “honors the men, their memory and their mission”. The project is responsible for discovery and mapping of 4 out of 8 of the US WWII submarines located to date.The

Image courtesy of the NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program

#Oi2020 History: ROV D2

applications. To continue the research and technology within this area of subsea development, NOAA’s Office of Ocean Exploration and Research (OER) in 2013 introduced a new ROV, the Deep Discoverer, or “D2.” The ROV, (also known as D2) which operates from NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer, is unique in that it is one of the few ROVs capable of diving to 3.7 miles (6,000 meters). Measuring 10 x 6.5 x 8.5 feet high and weighing 9,150 pounds, the ROV is also equipped with various sensors to measure parameters such as salinity, water temperature, depth, and dissolved oxygen. Marine

History: First MODU to Use Subsea Well Control

In 1955, the Western Explorer, owned by Chevron, is introduced in the Santa Barbara Channel as the first floating drilling MODU to use subsea well control. The unit, built by the CUSS group (Continental, Union, Shell, and Superior Oil (now Global Santa Fe)), measured 260 feet and had a 48-foot beam. It was retired in 1972. Marine Technology Reporter has been commissioned to publish the Official “Oceanology International 50th Anniversary Edition.” For information on advertising in this edition, contact Rob Howard @ howard@marinelink.com or Mike Kozlowski @ kozlowski@marinelink.com.

ASV BEN (Bathymetric Explorer and Navigator) is a custom prototype built by SV Global Unmanned Marine System for University of New Hampshire’s Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping. ASV BEN has a state-of-the art seafloor mapping system that can map depths reaching 650 feet. (Photo: Ocean Exploration Trust)

Searching for Shipwrecks

went well, they would discover new shipwrecks and natural features such as sinkholes, fish habitats, and interesting geological formations.During the two-week expedition, researchers mapped areas within the sanctuary with a multibeam sonar system aboard autonomous surface vehicle ASV BEN (Bathymetric Explorer and Navigator) from University of New Hampshire’s Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping. BEN is a state-of-the-art robotic vehicle that looks like a small yellow boat. Unlike most boats, though, it doesn’t carry people; instead, it is piloted by crew members back on shore. Using sonar

Marine Technology Magazine Cover Nov 2019 - MTR White Papers: Subsea Vehicles

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