Hawaii News

Photo: SubCom

Tonga Cable System Repaired

points in Tonga: Neiafu, Nukualofa and Pangai. SubCom maintains these two cables in addition to 31 other systems as part of the SPMMA, which was signed in 2017. The agreement covers the South Pacific region from Singapore in the west to Tahiti in the east and from the southernmost point of New Zealand to Hawaii.SubCom Reliance is part of the company’s world-class fleet, purpose-built for cable deployment and maintenance. The ship was on standby in the South Pacific at a port in Apia, Samoa. SubCom’s highly trained crew of experienced merchant mariners, submersible engineers, and cable operations

(Photo: VideoRay)

Downed Fighter Jet Recovered off Hawaii

A remotely operated underwater vehicle (ROV) was recently used to help locate a downed fighter jet off Hawaii.The privately owned Hawker Hunter aircraft crashed on December 12, 2018 while participating in the Hawaii Air National Guard sponsored training exercise Sentry Aloha. The pilot ejected before the crash and was rescued by the Coast Guard with the assistance of nearby good Samaritans, but the plane was sent crashing into the ocean.The aicraft hit the water about 1 mile south of Honolulu in an area with many small boats. The number of boats in the area meant there were many cellphone videos

(Photo: Vryhof)

Vryhof Reports New Contracts

.The company will supply geotechnical expertise and drag embedment anchors to mooring specialists SOFEC for use in an oil and gas project, offshore Malaysia.Another Vryhof company, Moorlink, a provider of connectors and mobile and permanent mooring solutions, has secured a renewables contract in Hawaii, where its swivels will be put to use in extreme conditions. The new deal highlights Moorlink’s commitment to the emerging renewables marine energy market and its ability to customize innovative and cost efficient solutions for pressurized budgets made possible through more than 20 years expertise

(Photo: The Ocean Cleanup)

Ocean Cleanup Device Malfunctions

A first-of-its-kind floating ocean cleanup system deployed to collect plastic pollution from the Great Pacific Garbage Patch has been taken out of service early after it broke apart while operating halfway between Hawaii and California.The wind- and wave-propelled cleanup system, launched from San Francisco in September by Dutch nonprofit The Ocean Cleanup, consists of a 600-meter-long U-shaped floating barrier with a three-meter skirt below that glides at the ocean surface to collect plastic and funnel all debris at its center.Operations have been put on hold after an 18-meter section separated from

Fig. 1: Teledyne RDI ADCP attached to a hydrographic package before lowering to great depths. Credit: J. Lemus (U. Hawaii). https://goo.gl/VfvYn1

Full-Depth Current Profiling Around the Global Ocean

expensive. Scientists sought a method that was more economical, easier to use, and available to a wider audience.Over several years, a handful of experts adapted ADCPs to meet this demand. They devised the LADCP method and processing (https://goo.gl/1TGXBn). Key input came from staff at the University of Hawaii and Lamont Doherty Geological Observatory in USA and IFM Kiel in Germany.Lowered ADCP MethodDeep current profiling measures below the acoustic range of ship-mounted profilers. Attached to a lowered hydrographic package, compact self-contained ADCPs pass through the water column. During descent and

A smaller prototype tested in Galway Bay, Ireland. (Photo: Ocean Energy)

The OE Buoy is Taking Shape

constructing a marine hydrokinetic convertor called the OE Buoy for U.S. and Irish based wave-power pioneer Ocean Energy. Once completed in spring 2019, the 125 feet long, 68 feet tall, and 59 feet wide wave device will be towed to the U.S. Navy Wave Energy Test Site on the windward coast of O’ahu, Hawaii.The private sector project is supported by the U.S. and Irish governments and their agencies as part of an agreement committing both governments to collaborating on marine hydrokinetic technologies.The 125-foot OE Buoy has a potential rated capacity of up to 1.25 MW in electrical power production

(Photo: The Ocean Cleanup)

The Ocean Cleanup Kicks Off

A first-of-its-kind floating ocean cleanup system is undergoing a final round of testing before it begins removing plastic pollution from the Great Pacific Garbage Patch halfway between Hawaii and California.The system developed by the Dutch nonprofit The Ocean Cleanup was launched from San Francisco Bay on September 8 and towed 350 nautical miles by the vessel Maersk Launcher to an offshore test site. System 001 will now undergo two weeks of trials before continuing its journey to start collecting debris at the world’s largest accumulation of ocean plastic some 1,200 nautical miles off the

WAM-V USV (Photo: Marine Advanced Research)

Drone Boats to Face-Off in Global RobotX Challenge

Challenge will battle for cash prizes and bragging rights by completing a series of tasks to demonstrate navigation and control; obstacle detection and avoidance; station keeping and docking; and observation, identification and reporting of a specified target.The competition, set to take place in Oahu, Hawaii from December 8-15, will include students from 13 universities representing Australia, China, Japan, Singapore, Taiwan and the U.S.The purpose of the challenge is to foster innovation as students develop their skills in systems engineering and autonomous command and control, while collaborating with

(Photo: Seatools)

Remote Monitoring System Delivered for The Ocean Cleanup

to removing plastic from the world’s oceans.The monitoring system is currently integrated into the first-ever ocean cleanup system at The Ocean Cleanup’s assembly yard in Alameda, Calif.In the third quarter of 2018, The Ocean Cleanup’s system will be deployed into the waters between Hawaii and San Francisco. The primary goal of the Pacific trials is to confirm the performance of the cleanup system in a fully operational configuration, before commencing The Ocean Cleanup’s large-scale cleaning plans in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch.During the upcoming trials, Seatools&rsquo

(Photo: Liquid Robotics)

Ocean Robots Gather Live Data from Volcano Lava Flow

Two high-tech autonomous ocean robots have been deployed to capture live ocean data close to where lava is flowing into the ocean from Hawaii’s Kilauea Volcano.By using Liquid Robotics’ unmanned Wave Gliders, scientists have the rare opportunity to study the effects of the lava entering the ocean, the plume it creates and the interactions of the lava and seawater directly from the surface of the ocean. Scientists note that very few volcanic eruptions and lava flows have ever been monitored in real time from the ocean.Over a three-week mission, the long-duration wave and solar powered Wave

Divers prepare to go underwater for the fastening of the mooring line to its anchor (Photo courtesy of the U.S. Coast Guard)

US Coast Guard Tests Environmentally Friendly Buoy Moorings

, even though they weren’t eligible to receive a cash prize under the America COMPETES Act.  From among the proposals, S&T found a potential solution to the problem in a simple, but effective, buoy mooring system. Instead of a concrete sinker, Cole Keaoulu Santos, an innovator from Hawaii, proposed a narrow screw anchor; instead of a heavy metal chain, he suggested an elastic rope to prevent scraping of the ocean floor.“We consider DHS S&T a key partner to introducing technology and innovation into the Coast Guard. Leveraging the DHS public prize competitions allows us to

Modeled mass concentration of plastics in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch (Image: The Ocean Cleanup Foundation)

The World’s Largest Ocean Garbage Patch is Growing Rapidly

The world’s largest heap of ocean garbage is growing at an alarming rate.   The 600,000-square-mile collection of ocean plastic and trash floating halfway between California and Hawaii known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch now contains four to 16 times more plastic than previously estimated, with pollution levels increasing exponentially, new analysis reveals.   It’s estimated some 1.8 trillion pieces of plastic weighing 80,000 metric tons are currently afloat in the area, and it is rapidly getting worse, according to a study published Thursday in the peer-reviewed journal

MakaiLay’s new 3D Viewer showing the vessel, plough and cable shapes for progressive time steps seen behind the vessel. Relevant GIS data can be imported, such as digital terrain tiles on the bathymetry and aerial imagery overlay on the terrain in the background, as is shown here (Image: Makai Ocean Engineering)

MakaiLay Software Installed on Prysmian Cable Layer

2021.   “We made it our priority to extend our popular real-time submarine cable installation management software to submarine power cable installations and we are excited that an industry leader like Prysmian Group has decided to use our software,” said Dr. Jose Andres, president of Hawaii based Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc., producer of MakaiLay. “We have added specific tools to satisfy the unique demands of power cable installations and we will continue to enhance the software as we receive feedback from our installation partners.”   MakaiLay integrates data from

© Alexstar / Adobe Stock

Coral Reefs at Risk of Dissolving: Study

; The report said it was “unknown if the whole reef will erode once the sediments become net dissolving” and whether reefs “will experience catastrophic destruction” or merely a slow erosion.   Some reef sediments were already starting to dissolve, such as at Kaneohe Bay in Hawaii, where other pollutants were contributing.   Eyre said it was unclear if the dissolution of sediments could be a long-term threat to entire islands, from the Pacific to the Caribbean. Other studies say that deep cuts in greenhouse gas emissions can limit acidification.   Most studies

A smaller prototype tested in Galway Bay, Ireland. (Photo: Ocean Energy)

Irish Wave Buoy to Be Deployed at US Navy Test Site

Despite some 7,000 miles separating Ireland and Hawaii, the two islands have a lot in common. The islands’ peoples have always looked to their respective oceans for resources, inspiration and opportunity.   Today, Irish company Ocean Energy announced its wave energy convertor OE Buoy will be built by Oregon-based Vigor and deployed at the U.S. Navy’s Wave Energy Test Site on the windward coast of the Hawaiian Island of O’ahu in the fall of 2018. The contract value is $6.5 million out of a total project value of $12 million for this first of a kind grid scale project at the U.S.

Dr. Kelly Gleason investigates a ginger jar at the Two Brothers shipwreck site (Credit: NOAA)

Hawaiian Islands Shipwreck Makes History – Again

on the open ocean and, eventually, cannibalism — found its way to Herman Melville, who used the incident as fodder for his classic novel, Moby Dick. Years later and in control of the vessel Two Brothers, Pollard gained notoriety again when his ship hit a shallow reef off French Frigate Shoals in Hawaii on the night of February 11, 1823. Fearing a repeat of his harrowing experience with the Essex, Pollard hesitated about what to do but his crew persuaded him to abandon ship. They all spent a long night clinging to small boats for survival and were rescued the next morning by a passing ship. As for

Wheelhouse of the USS Ward (Photo courtesy of Paul G. Allen)

Wreckage of USS Ward Found in the Philippines

images just prior to the anniversary of the December 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor.   At 6:45 a.m. on Sunday, December 7, 1941, the Wickes-class destroyer fired America’s first shot in World War II when its crew sighted and sank a Japanese midget submarine just outside of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii about an hour before the air attack began.   Three years later to the day, on December 7, 1944, the vessel (since converted to a high-speed transport ship and redesignated APD-16) was lost after coming under attack by several kamikazes while patrolling Ormoc Bay off the island of Leyte. Unable

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