Marshall Islands News

3D at Depth SL3 non-touch data collection process with the TBD-1 Devastator Aircraft (Credit: Air/Sea Heritage Foundation photo by Brett Seymour)

Subsea Wreck Brought to Life by Lasers

aircraft resting at the bottom of the sea.The technique was developed during an October 2018 expedition with the nonprofit Air/Sea Heritage Foundation to document the largely intact wreck of a US Navy Douglas TBD-1 Devastator aircraft on the seafloor of the Jaluit Lagoon in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI).Of the 129 Devastators built, all were either lost in battle, destroyed in operational accidents, or scrapped before the end of World War II. Part of the ongoing “Devastator Project,” this recent expedition was developed to capture precise, repeatable, millimetric data to build

Walter Munk, 2017 (Photo: Erik Jepsen/UC San Diego)

Walter Munk: 1917-2019

on defense to a focus on basic science questions supported by entities such as the National Science Foundation. He took part in iconic seagoing expeditions including the Capricorn Expedition in 1952 and 1953. For this expedition, Munk, Revelle and dozens of other scientists were dispatched to the Marshall Islands in the Pacific Ocean in the prelude to the testing of a nuclear bomb at Bikini Atoll. Munk’s concern for the potential that the detonation would trigger a tsunami led to his development of early warning methods incorporated into modern warning networks. During Capricorn, Munk was also

Image: DNV GL

Seacor Marine Acquires Three Cosco PSVs

industry for many years to come.”The PSVs acquired are Rolls Royce UT771CDL design of 3,800 tons deadweight capacity with dynamic position class 2 and firefighting class 1 notations. They can accommodate a subsequent upgrade to a battery hybrid power solution. They will be registered in the Marshall Islands and be named the M/V Seacor   Alps, Seacor   Andes, and Seacor   Atlas, respectively.Seacor Marine provides global marine and support transportation services to offshore oil and natural gas and windfarm facilities worldwide

(U.S. Navy photo by LeighAhn Ferrari)

Oil Removed from WWII Era Shipwreck

A U.S. Navy led team has removed 229,000 gallons of oil from a sunken World War II era German heavy cruiser that has been resting on the seafloor near the Marshall Islands for more than 70 years.After being transferred to the U.S. as a war prize, the cruiser Prinz Eugen was loaded with oil and cargo and used to assess survivability of warships during the Operation Crossroads atomic bomb tests in the Pacific. The ship survived two atomic blasts before being towed to Kwajalein Atoll, where it capsized and sunk in December 1946.Now, 72 years later, a project team led by Stephanie Bocek of the Navy's

Virginia class Attack Submarine

Virginia-Class Submarine Named USS Iowa

of Spanish ships off the coast of Cuba and the resulting first shot fired during the Spanish American War's Battle of Santiago. The third Iowa (BB 61) was commissioned in 1943 and earned 11 battle stars - nine for World War II and two for the Korean War -  for  campaigns in places from the Marshall Islands, Saipan, Rota, Okinawa, the Philippines and North Korea. After returning from combat, Iowa served the remainder of her days running training cruises and operational exercises before being decommissioned in 1958. It was then re-commissioned in 1984 to help expand the size of the Fleet during

Features on a photo of USS Independence CVL 22 are captured in a 3D low-resolution sonar image of the shipwreck in Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. The Coda Octopus Echoscope 3D sonar, integrated on the Boeing AUV Echo Ranger, imaged the shipwreck during the first maritime archaeological survey. The sonar image with oranges color tones (lower) shows an outline of a possible airplane in the forward aircraft elevator hatch opening. (Credit: NOAA, Boeing, and Coda Octopus)

'Amazingly Intact' WWII-era Aircraft Carrier Surveyed

and Research, who joined the mission along with Robert Schwemmer, west coast regional maritime heritage coordinator for NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries.   Delgado, primary author of a 1990 scientific report on the history and archaeology of the ships sunk at Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands, said currently there are no plans to enter the vessel or survey drums of hazardous and radioactive waste that were dumped in the sanctuary between 1946 and 1970. No trace of the drums or radiation was observed during the mission, Delgado said.   Gulf of the Farallones National Marine

The progressive effects of bleaching on a once healthy elkhorn coral (Acropora palmata) during a recent bleaching event in Florida. (Credit: NOAA)

Warm Oceans May Mean Major Coral Bleaching -NOAA

their coral reefs.   Initial tests of the outlook and daily five-kilometer bleaching thermal stress products proved useful for predicting, monitoring, and understanding major coral bleaching and mortality events in Guam, the Mariana Islands, the Northwestern and main Hawaiian Islands, the Marshall Islands, Kiribati, the Florida Keys, and elsewhere in 2014.   “Climate change and its impacts, which can include bleaching, are some of the most pressing global threats to coral reef ecosystems today,” said Jennifer Koss, acting program manager for NOAA’s Coral Reef Conservation

Rising Seas Wash Japanese War Dead from Pacific Island Graves

Rising sea levels have washed the remains of at least 26 Japanese World War Two soldiers from their graves on a low-lying Pacific archipelago, the foreign minister of the Marshall Islands said on Friday. "There are coffins and dead people being washed away from graves. It's that serious," Tony de Brum told reporters on the sidelines of U.N. climate change talks in Germany. Putting the blame on climate change, which threatens the existence of the islands that are only 2 meters (6 ft) above sea level at their highest, de Brum said: "Even the dead are affected." Twenty-six

Global Warming Damages Corals Vital to Small Islands

, head of the U.N. Climate Change Secretariat, told a news conference. The report said that small islands could shift to abundant solar and wind power to help cut fuel import bills, which are often between five and 20 percent of gross domestic product. "We are doing what we can," said Marshall Islands Environment Minister Tony de Brum, pointing to plans to invest in solar energy. His nation also has the world's largest shark sanctuary as part of efforts to protect nature, he added. (By Alister Doyle, Environment Correspondent, Editing by Gareth Jones

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