Naval Surface Warfare Center News

Photo: JW Fisher

JW Fishers’ Pulse 8X Continues to Outperform

as expected and continues to serve as a force multiplier for this highly impressive team.A few of the many other military and law enforcement dive teams using the Pulse 8X are the U.S. Customs and Border Patrol, Connecticut State Police, Swedish Coast Guard, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, US Naval Surface Warfare Center, Texas Highway Patrol, New Jersey State Police, Policia de Puerto Rico, Ottawa Police Service in Canada, Oklahoma Highway Patrol, Olmstead Sheriffs Dive Team in Minnesota, Maine State Police, and the U.S. Navy Expeditionary Combat Command and their Facilities Engineering Service Center

The ONR TechSolutions-sponsored scuba binary dive application (SBDA 100) replaces traditional paper logs and automates the logging and submission of dive profiles directly from a dive computer worn by Navy Divers to the Naval Safety Center DJRS database. (U.S. Navy photo by Bobby Cummings)

Navy Divers to Have Automated Logging from Worn Dive Computers

to use, and I have no doubt it’s going to streamline efficiency.”Throughout the process of the development of the SBDA 100, ONR TechSolutions has worked in conjunction with Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command (SPAWAR) Atlantic; industry partner Intelligent Automation Inc.; and Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC) Panama City, which is the home of the U.S. Naval Diving and Salvage Training Center. SPAWAR served as the principal investigator and NSWC Panama City provided technical support and hosted the training and demonstration of the SBDA 100 at sea.“The technology has tested very

The U.S. Naval Surface Warfare Center Carderock Division’s South Florida Ocean Measurement Facility (Photo: Sonardyne)

Sonardyne Aids US Navy Underwater Vehicle Testing

Underwater target tracking technology from Houston-based Sonardyne Inc., has been chosen by the U.S. Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Carderock Division for testing subsea systems and underwater vehicles in development for the Navy and wider maritime industry.Located in Maryland, Carderock Division is the U.S. Navy's research, engineering, modelling and test center for surface and undersea technologies. It is the largest, most comprehensive establishment of its kind in the world. Thanks to its proximity to the Gulf Stream, Carderock’s South Florida Ocean Measurement Facility (SFOMF)

The William B Morgan Large Cavitation Channel (LCC) is a large variable-pressure closed-loop water tunnel that has been operated by the U.S. Navy in Memphis since 1991. This facility is well designed for a wide variety of hydrodynamic and hydroacoustic tests. Its overall size and capabilities allow test-model Reynolds numbers to approach, or even achieve, those of full-scale air- or water-borne transportation systems. (Photo: U.S. Navy)

Navy Tests Scale Models in Big Facilities

Inside Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock DivisionThe Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division in West Bethesda, Md., is one of the world’s leading centers for surface and underwater hydrodynamic expertise, research and design, to include world-class facilities for experimentation, testing, evaluation and validation.“We build scale models of ship designs and can test these hull forms in our facilities to measure hydrodynamic load on the structure or evaluate seakeeping abilities,” said Mike Brown, head of Carderock’s Naval Architecture and Engineering Department.

Photo: FAU

Autonomous Vessels: FAU Gets $1.25m for Research

that may serve as a mobile coastal monitoring system, as well as training and education of graduate and undergraduate students in ocean engineering.   The project will leverage and collaborate with FAU’s ongoing Naval Engineering Education Consortium effort in conjunction with the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Panama City, which involves use of two unmanned underwater vehicles (UUV) for adaptive subsurface sensing in support of detection of objects on the sea bottom. “Fostering collaborative partnerships in scientific research is essential to ensuring that the United States remains at

Marine Technology Reporter - May 2018

The May 2018 edition of Marine Technology Reporter is now available in print and online.This edition includes features on:Subsea residency: robotic systems move closer to living on the seafloorResearch facilities: MTR goes inside Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division, where the U.S. Navy tests scale models in big facilities Subsea engineering: powering up the seafloor in an effort to boost oil and gas productionNew tech: the latest from gliders to USBLsResearch vessels...and moreRead more at https://magazines.marinelink.com/nwm/MarineTechnology/201805/.

Figure 1: Hell Bay 4 demonstrated collaboration using robots from different manufacturers. 10 systems networked together through a central command station. (Photo Courtesy SeeByte)

Unmanned Forces: Building a Multi-Domain Autonomous Fleet

number of areas: defense scientific and technical information exchange, program harmonization and alignment, and shared research activities for the governments of United States, United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and New Zealand.   In Hell Bay 4 SeeByte supported the U.S. Navy Labs from Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City Division (NSWC-PCD) and Space & Naval Warfare Systems Center, Pacific (SPAWAR-SSCPAC), Defense Research and Development Canada (DRDC) and the U.K.’s Defense Science and Technology Lab (Dstl). SeeByte’s Neptune software formed the basis of the autonomy engine

Six micro-UUVs ready for delivery (Photo: Riptide)

UUV Manufacturer Aims Big by Going Small

.   In March 2016 the first three production micro-UUVs were delivered to SPAWAR Systems Center - Pacific. These vehicles were configured with a flooded payload module to enable rapid payload development and demonstration.   In July 2016 six micro-UUVs were delivered to the Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City Division (NSWC PCD). These vehicles were configured with a dry payload volume that will enable the Navy to test various new sensor systems with these small flexible vehicles.   During the week of Aug. 22-26, 2016 Department of the Navy scientists and engineers collaborated

The AquaHarmonics team, Alex Hagmuller and Max Ginsburg, stand with its 1/20th scale device. (Photo: Wave Energy Prize)

Wave Energy Prize's $1.5 Million Winner Announced

, which were announced in March. These teams received up to $125,000 in seed funding to build scaled prototypes of their wave energy converter devices. With the support of the U.S. Navy, the finalist teams tested their prototype devices at the nation's most advanced wave-making facility, the Naval Surface Warfare Center's Maneuvering and Seakeeping Basin at Carderock, Md.   “This competition set a difficult threshold of doubling the energy captured from ocean waves, and four teams surpassed that goal,” said Lynn Orr, DOE’s Under Secretary for Science and Energy. “AquaHarmonics&rs

Photo: SeeByte

SeeByte Supports Unmanned Warrior Operators

for unmanned maritime systems, announced its participation in Unmanned Warrior. SeeByte was involved in four threads: Automatic Target Recognition (ATR), Command and Control, Collaborative Autonomy and Smart ROV Control. As part of this exercise, SeeByte supported the U.S. Navy Lab of Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City Division (NSWC-PCD), Defence Research and Development Canada, an agency of the Canadian Department of National Defence, and the U.K.’s Defence Science and Technology Lab (Dstl).    Together with ASV Global, Bluebear, and QinetiQ the team were successful in

Petty Officer 2nd Class Tammy Helm from the Naval Oceanography Operations Command programs a REMUS 100 unmanned underwater vehicle prior to a mission as part of the first-ever Unmanned Warrior. (U.S. Navy photo by John F. Williams)

Unmanned Warrior: The Science behind the Systems

their expertise to the technical dialogue and their leadership skills to the coordination across many participating commands, which include: Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command; Naval Oceanographic Office; Naval Oceanography Mine Warfare Center; Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Newport; Naval Surface Warfare Center, Panama City and Dahlgren Divisions; Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific; Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division; Navy Warfare Development Command; U.S. Sixth Fleet.   Thus far, testing and experimentation has been a resounding success: Analysis of the operational

Marine Technology Magazine Cover May 2019 - Underwater Defense Technology

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