Thyssenkrupp News

On April 9, 2020, "S43" as the third of four HDW Class 209/1400mod submarines was officially handed over by thyssenkrupp Marine Systems to the Navy of the Arab Republic of Egypt. (Photo: © thyssenkrupp AG, https://www.thyssenkrupp-marinesystems.com)

Thyssenkrupp in Talks About Possible Warship Unit Merger

German conglomerate Thyssenkrupp is in talks about possibly merging its subsidiary ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems (TKMS) with a domestic rival to create a national champion.The Thyssenkrupp board member in charge of the marine systems unit, Oliver Burkhard, tweeted earlier that the company was in talks as an alliance could make sense in the current European market environment, with the creation of a national champion one possible outcome.The tweet followed a report by public sector broadcaster NDR which said Thyssenkrupp was sounding out domestic rivals German Naval Yards (GNYK) and Luerssen.A Thyssenkrupp

Image: thyssenkrupp Marine Systems

TMS to Use 3D Printers for Submarines

German industrial conglomerate Thyssenkrupp Marine Systems (TMS) plans to use 3D printers increasingly in manufacturing submarine parts. This offers decisive advantages over conventionally produced components.The corresponding quality and safety approvals have already been granted. Through acquisition of the thyssenkrupp TechCenter Additive Manufacturing (in Mülheim an der Ruhr, North Rhein-Westphalia), the required technology and expertise will now come to the Kiel Fjord. It is planned to complete the transition by June 2020.Dr. Luis Alejandro Orellano, COO of thyssenkrupp Marine Systems said:

Pic: A probehead for taking gas samples in hot gas atmosphere, produced at the thyssenkrupp TechCenter Additive Manufacturing. It is additive manufactured from austenitic heat resistant steel, and has a longer service life due to integrated cooling channels. Image courtesy of thyssenkrupp

Thyssenkrupp Wins 3D Printing Approval

The international accredited registrar and classification society DNV GL has awarded thyssenkrupp, German multinational conglomerate, first additive manufacturing  approval of manufacturer certificateThe shipping industry is looking to take advantage of additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D printing, to print spare parts, thereby reducing lead times, costs, stock requirements, and environmental impacts. Certification ensures that AM part users can have the same confidence in an additive manufactured product as a conventionally produced one.The newly issued certificate makes the thyssenkrupp

Thyssenkrupp’s MUM concept. Image from Thyssenkrupp.

Robotics: The Next Gen in Subsea Vehicles

swarms of drop deployed ocean bottom nodes that can find their way to pre-programmed locations.At energy:connected, as the Oslo-based Subsea Valley cluster and annual conference is now called, some of these concepts were outlined, including those from two Norwegian technology firms and Germany’s Thyssenkrupp, a firm more used to designing naval submarine systems.  uSEA unveils uLARSOne, Norwegian technology start-up uSEA, is proposing a hybrid system to disrupt existing manned vessel supported subsea operations via a subsea and surface drone combination.uSEA was founded in 2017 and since then

© marko okjan/AdobeStock

Naval Group inks $36B Submarine Contract

strategic and trade interests in the Asia-Pacific region.The first of the new submarines is scheduled to be delivered in the early 2030s and the final vessel during the 2050s.Australia rejected offers from Japan's Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and Kawasaki Heavy Industries, as well as Germany's ThyssenKrupp AG, when it accepted the French bid. (Reporting by Colin Packham Editing by Paul Tait

(Image: thyssenkrupp)

MUM's the Word: New UUV Takes Shape in Germany

, are aiming to drive the subsea vehicle market further faster courtesy of a project known as the Large Modifiable Underwater Mothership, or MUM.   “Today’s AUVs are usually limited with regard to energy, payload capacity and autonomy,” said Hendrik Wehner, Design Engineer, thyssenkrupp Marine Systems. “For a sole autonomous movement of the ships, smart software solutions are needed. Our partners from University of Rostock and ATLAS ELEKTRONIK are setting the pace there. Large autonomous underwater platforms that can be configured around a payload do not yet exist. MUM

Meet MUM: Large Modifiable Underwater Mothership. Image: thyssenkrupp

MUM's the Word: New UUV Takes Shape in Germany

from Germany, engineers teamed from industry and academia, are aiming to drive the subsea vehicle market further faster courtesy of a project known as the Large Modifiable Underwater Mothership, or MUM.   The project brings several notable entities to the table, including engineers from thyssenkrupp, Berlin Technical University, the University of Rostock, Atlas Elektronk and EvoLogics, all working together to develop a new type of unmanned underwater vehicle.    MUM will receive funding from the German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy over three years, and

Norway to Buy ThyssenKrupp Subs

Norway plans to sign a deal to buy four submarines from ThyssenKrupp in 2019, Norwegian defence minister Marie Eriksen Soreide said on Tuesday during a visit with her German counterpart to a German marine base.   German media has reported the four submarines will cost 4.3 billion euros ($5.06 billion).   The purchase of the ships is part of a cooperation agreement between the two countries, under which Germany's armed forces will buy two identical submarines from Germany's ThyssenKrupp and missiles from Norway's Kongsberg. "We want to sign the deal in 2019 and get the first

Kongsberg Eyes Key Contract in German-Norwegian Submarine Deal

Norwegian conglomerate Kongsberg Gruppen aims to supply command and control systems to the submarines that Norway and Germany plan to order from Germany's Thyssenkrupp, a spokesman for the company said on Friday. The Norwegian and German governments on Friday said they aim to buy a combined six submarines, and that talks with Poland and the Netherlands could lead to further orders. "The (Norwegian) defence minister made it very clear today that one of the main reasons for choosing Thyssenkrupp was that it was the best solution for industrial partnerships," Kongsberg Gruppen spokesman

(image: DCNS Group)

France sinks Japanese, German Sub Bids

. Japan's government with its Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and Kawasaki Heavy Industries boat had been seen as early frontrunners for the contract, but their inexperience in global defence deals and an initial reluctance to say they would build in Australia saw them slip behind DCNS and Germany's ThyssenKrupp AG. POLITICAL IMPLICATIONS Industry watchers had anticipated a decision to come later in the year, but Turnbull's gamble on a July 2 general election sped up the process. The contract will have an impact on thousands of jobs in the shipbuilding industry in South Australia, where retaining

Marine Technology Magazine Cover May 2020 -

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