Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution News

Gulf of Mexico Sea-surface altitude indicating surface current speed (Image: Louisiana State University / NOAA)

New Research on Gulf of Mexico Loop Current

ProfilersThis project will procure, deploy, and maintain a fleet of autonomous ocean dynamics-instrumented profiling floats to measure temperature, salinity, and current velocities in LCS active areas of the eastern Gulf of Mexico. Award Amount: $1,155,371Project Director: Amy Bower (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)Project Team Affiliation: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in cooperation with Centro de Investigación Científica y de Educación Superior de Ensenada (Center for Scientific Research and Higher Education at Ensenada)Numerical ModelingThis project will perform

An artist’s depiction of LRAUV under sea ice. Using photo-chemical sensors, the robot scans the density of a billowing cloud of oil coming from an ocean floor well. The red and yellow objects are parts of a communication system consisting of antennas suspended under ice from a buoy installed on top of the ice.  Graphic by ADAC.

LRAUV: Arctic Oil-Spill-Mapping Robot Put to the Test

Guard map oil spills under ice, the DHS Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) has been working on an underwater robot for the past four years through a DHS Center of Excellence, the Arctic Domain Awareness Center (ADAC) at the University of Alaska Anchorage, in partnership with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute.The result of this research is the Tethys Long Range Autonomic Underwater Vehicle or LRAUV, a helicopter-portable, torpedo-shaped system with oil sensors and navigation capabilities. This robot can provide real-time data for first

The research vessel Neil Armstrong arrived to recover a surface mooring that is part of the OOI Global Array in the Irminger Sea south of Greenland in 2016. (Photo by James Kuo, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

NSF Awards Contract to Continue Ocean Observatories Initiative

has received additional support from the National Science Foundation (NSF).The NSF awarded a coalition of academic and oceanographic research organizations a five-year, $220 million contract to operate and maintain the Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI). The coalition, led by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), with direction from the NSF and guidance from the OOI Facilities Board, will include the University of Washington (UW), Oregon State University (OSU), and Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey.The OOI is an advanced system of integrated, scientific platforms and sensors

Sam Harp (Photo: WHOI)

WHOI Hires Harp in Advancement, Marketing Role

The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has hired international brand marketing expert Samuel C. Harp as the Institution’s first Vice President for Advancement and Chief Marketing Officer. Harp has spent much of his career in academic, technology, and research institutions and will begin working at WHOI on October 1.Harp most recently served as the Chief Marketing and Communications Officer for the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, where he has worked for more than eight years. Before working at Harvard, Harp worked in marketing, communications, and business development roles at

Number 1 on MTR's list of "Top10 Ocean Influencers" is Yohei Sasakawa, chairman, Nippon Foundation. (Copyright: Nippon Foundation.)

MTR’s “Top 10” Ocean Influencers

John M. Richardson, Chief of Naval OperationsThe United States Navy, led by Admiral John Richardson who graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1982 with a Bachelor of Science in Physics, a master’s degrees in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and National Security Strategy from the National War College, is one of the world’s leading purveyors and developers of subsea technology.Several years ago at the home of then-CNO Admiral (Ret.) Gary Roughead, Marine Technology Reporter was invited to take part in a meeting

Researchers converted their three-finger soft manipulator to a two-finger version, seen here performing a pinch grasp on an extremely delicate sea cucumber. (Credit: Schmidt Ocean Institute)

A Soft Solution to a Hard Underwater Problem

create solutions to existing problems.”Additional authors of the paper include Kaitlyn Becker and Mortiz Graule from the Wyss Institute and Harvard SEAS, Brennan Phillips, Ph.D. from the University of Rhode Island, Randi Rotjan, Ph.D. from Boston University, Timothy Shank, Ph.D. from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and Erik Cordes, Ph.D. from Temple University.The research was supported by the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Association, the Schmidt Ocean Institute, the National Science Foundation, the National Academy of Sciences, the PIPA Conservation Trust, the PIPA Scientific Committee

(Photo: Jayne Doucette, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

WHOI Test Site Aims to Boost Marine Robotics Sector

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution’s (WHOI) Center for Marine Robotics kicked off its 4th Annual Entrepreneur Showcase and Leadership Forum last week with the official opening of a new pressure test facility that will help researchers and companies better develop innovative marine technologies. The new facility will allow WHOI to replicate the pressure of the deep ocean in an onshore facility which will more than triple the project capacity of its existing manually-operated system, allow for unattended 24/7 operations, and expand the ability of researchers and private firms to test their

Following days of heavy rain from Hurricane Harvey in August 2017, rivers and bays around the Houston metropolitan area and the Texas coast were full of flood water, which brought muddy, sediment-laden waters inland into the Gulf of Mexico. (Photo: NASA Earth Observatory)

How Does River Outflow Impact Coastal Sea Level?

A new study led by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has uncovered a new factor affecting coastal sea levels.Tides, winds, waves and even barometric pressure have been known to play a role in the ebb and flow of the ocean in coastal areas. According to the recent study, river outflow could play a role in sea level change as well.The study, published July 9 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, examined decades’ worth of river level and tidal data from gauges installed throughout the eastern U.S. The researchers then combined that data with information on

REMUS M3V  (Photo: Hydroid)

Hydroid's Most Compact AUV Ever Produced

one of the most compact autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) ever produced, they collaborated with Nortek to provide high-quality navigational equipment capable of fitting such a small form factor.   Hydroid has built on REMUS AUV technology – first developed at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts – to become a leading manufacturer of trusted, field-proven lightweight AUVs for underwater search and survey. Acquired by Norwegian technology firm Kongsberg Maritime in 2008, the company manufactures AUVs suitable for a range of subsea conditions, from those

Photo: EdgeTech

$17B Spanish Galleon San Jose: EdgeTech Instrumental

said it was key to the discovery of the most valuable shipwreck in the world. Sought after by treasure hunters for more than 300 years, the wreck of the Spanish Galleon San Jose was finally discovered on November 27, 2015 and just recently made public. The search was performed by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) Remus 6000 autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) equipped with an EdgeTech 2200 Side Scan Sonar.  AUV mission planning and sonar data analysis for the project was supplied by GK Consulting of Derry NH. The San Jose was a 62-gun flagship galleon of a Spanish fleet carrying

RV Thomas G. Thompson (Photo: University of Washington)

US Navy-owned Research Vessel Back in Action

out at sea and really need them to work well."The Thompson is one of three Navy-owned research vessels up for refit in coming years. The R/V Roger Revelle, operated by Scripps Institution of Oceanography since 1996, will begin its refit in 2019, and the R/V Atlantis, operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution since 1997, is scheduled for refit in 2020.Since the end of World War II, the Navy has provided research ships to select universities and oceanographic institutions to perform scientific studies of the marine environment. The Navy currently owns six of these vessels-part of the U.S

(Illustration by Natalie Renier, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

Atlantic Ocean Circulation at Weakest Point in 1,600 Years

A key cog in the global ocean circulation system hasn’t been running at peak strength since the mid-1800s and is currently at its weakest point in the past 1,600 years, as suggested by new research led by University College London (UCL) and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI). If the system continues to weaken, it could disrupt weather patterns from the United States and Europe to the African Sahel, and cause more rapid increase in sea level on the U.S. East Coast.When it comes to regulating global climate, the circulation of the Atlantic Ocean plays a key role. The constantly moving

A system having capacity to handle pressure testing at deeper waters than the deepest ocean point known, Mariana Trench Image by WHOI and Optime

WHOI Installs Hyperbaric Pressure System

The Massachusetts based Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) installed its newest 1380bar (20 000psi) hyperbaric pressure system supplied from Optime Subsea as part of a new test building and pit on WHOI’s premises.  The hyperbaric testing system hasbeen delivered by Optime Subsea with an inner diameter of 635mm (25in) and a height of 2 500mm (98in). It has just beeninstalled at WHOI’s facilities in Woods Hole, MA and includes both a pressure vessel and a control system.The new test chamber is part of a grant awarded from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts through the Massachusse

XPRIZE Senior Director Dr. Jyotika Virmani, Ph.D., will give a closing keynote at Catch The Next Wave. Credit: XPRIZE

Shell Ocean Discovery XPRIZE Announcements at OI2018

imaging technology used to capture the wonders of the ocean, Pen Hadow, Director of Arctic Mission (ocean life research) and 90ºNorth Unit (ecosystem protection), about the future technology required to explore and protect Arctic ocean life, and Chris German MBE, Senior Scientist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, talking about the frontiers of technology enabling ocean exploration on earth and other planets. Among the other speakers at Catch The Next Wave will be diver, presenter and explorer Rory Golden. “My presentation will touch on the development of the technology used to find

A stretch hose being deployed at sea (Photo: EOM Offshore)

WHOI Spins Off Tech Start-up EOM Offshore

On February 5, 2018, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) sold its majority ownership interest to EOM Offshore’s management team and investors while continuing to receive royalties under the existing exclusive licensing of its stretch hose technology. Rockland Trust Bank provided a line of credit to assist the change in ownership and help assure EOM Offshore’s continued financial strength.   EOM Offshore is a mooring systems and component company based on technology developed by engineers at WHOI. The company was founded as a start-up in 2009 to commercialize fatigue-resistant

(Photo: Riptide Autonomous Solutions)

Riptide Opens New Facility

its staff and manufacturing capabilities as well as an onsite marina. As Riptide focuses on compact, easily deployed, UUVs this site ensures easy access for engineering testing and customer demonstrations. Plymouth is conveniently located near major undersea technology centers including Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution on Cape Cod and the Naval Undersea Warfare Center in Newport, R.I.    With its new expanded space, Riptide said it looks to grow both its team and customer base in 2018. 

Electron microscope images of marine bacteria infected with the non-tailed viruses studied in this research. The bacterial cell walls are seen as long double lines, and the viruses are the small round objects with dark centers. (Courtesy of researchers)

New Virus Found in the Ocean

.   The newly identified viruses have long been missed by previous studies due several unusual properties including a lack of “tail” found on most catalogued and sequenced bacterial viruses.   This research, supported by the National Science Foundation and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution’s Ocean Ventures Fund, “opens new avenues for furthering our understanding of the roles of viruses in the ocean,” said Jed Fuhrman, the McCulloch-Crosby Chair of Marine Biology at the University of Southern California, who was not involved in this work.   &ldquo

Marine Technology Magazine Cover Nov 2018 - Acoustic Doppler Sonar Technologies ADCPs and DVLs

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